Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Drumclay Crannog

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member between the bridges's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    skintown
    Posts
    45,055
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)

    Default Drumclay Crannog

    This Saturday, local people and people far and wide, have been invited onto the site to see history unveiled before their very eyes.

    New discoveries made during the first ever substantial excavation of a crannog in Northern Ireland - an artificial island in a lake – in Co Fermanagh, are shedding dramatic new light on life in medieval Ireland, and its connections to the wider world. The “dig” is of growing international significance and is rewriting our understanding of medieval history.

    Environment Minister Attwood today visited the crannog to view the fascinating artefacts found and to announce the Drumclay Crannog Open Day on Saturday 1st December.

    At the excavation, revealing some of the most significant artefacts found, Environment Minister Alex Attwood said: “On my two visits to date, I have found the site, the dig, and the archaeology beyond my imagination, enormously exciting and changing my view of our history and Irish life. This is the first substantial, scientific excavation of a crannog in Northern Ireland. What has been found has the potential not only to be internationally important but ultimately to lead to a reassessment of life in Ulster in early Christian and medieval times.
    29 November 2012 - Fermanagh Crannog dig of ‘international significance’ – rewriting Ireland’s medieval history | Northern Ireland Executive

    UTV Gallery

    Pieces of a medieval board game and 1,000-year-old combs are among rare artefacts uncovered during an archaeological dig that is set to rewrite the history books.
    Experts have hailed the finds in Co Fermanagh as internationally significant, claiming they shed new light on life in medieval Ireland and its connection with the wider world.

    Iron, bronze and bone ornaments have been discovered at the crannog just outside Enniskillen, along with the chess-like pieces believed to have been part of the game. Parts of log boats, leather shoes, knives, decorated dress pins, wooden vessels and a bowl with a cross carved on its base were also unearthed during the six-month dig.

    The style and design of the antler and bone combs suggest influences from northern Europe and indicate that the Fermanagh settlement had international links 1,000 years ago.

    The Drumclay Crannog, which is an artificial island built in a lake, is the first of its type to be excavated in the north of Ireland since 1870. Archaeologists believe people may have lived there from 600 AD to 1600 AD, and it was probably the home of a noble family, with perhaps four or five houses inhabited at any time. Parents, grandparents, children and servants would all have stayed on the crannog.

    Read more: Medieval artefacts found at crannog - Northern Ireland, Local & National - Belfasttelegraph.co.uk

    The crannog was directly impacted by the ground works associated with the A32 link road under construction in Enniskillen, Fermanagh. It is a spectacularly well preserved site and from available information contains layer upon layer of preserved structures, fences and walkways. At its later levels it contains well stratified Ulster Coarse Ware and it preserves a large range of waterlogged wooden artefacts such as vessels, bowls, platters and leather objects such as shoes. Among the reported finds were a gold pin and disarticulated human remains. Without knowing the full results of the excavation we can only speculate on its full significance but in terms of environmental information, artefacts and structural remains it must be at least as important as Deer Park farms. The site was threatened by the original planning decision, the assessment and construction methodology and subsequent archaeological management. Although the facts and views we present have been compiled by us we know that many of the large number of people who subscribed to that site would support the spirit of our comments. This pressure group was almost entirely composed of archaeologists or other heritage professionals and was for the most part, we believe, a measured but urgent response to the issue.
    Robert M Chapple, Archaeologist: Drumclay, Cherrymount, a crannog in crisis

    i have myself booked on the tour to be one of the few to view this important site before they finish building the road over the top of it!!
    Nec Aspera Terrent..Is Tuaisceart-Éireannach mé. Má tá meas agat ar mo chultúr, beidh meas agam ar do chultúr.

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    12,595
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Thats for the post. Very interesting stuff.

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member Catalpast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Planet Blanchardstown
    Posts
    25,446
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)

    Default

    Great find up there

    Are there plans to display them locally?

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    12,851
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Outstanding find by all accounts, perhaps as big if not bigger than Lagore. Pity it will all be tarmacadam soon.
    "Only by applying the most rigorous standards do we pay writing in Irish the supreme compliment of taking it seriously." - Breandán Ó Doibhlín.

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member Twin Towers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    It always appears that we have had very little archaeological investigation of the enormous number of archaeological sites that we have.

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    12,851
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Twin Towers View Post
    It always appears that we have had very little archaeological investigation of the enormous number of archaeological sites that we have.
    We have about 50,000 ringforts alone in this country, and they are the visible sites.
    "Only by applying the most rigorous standards do we pay writing in Irish the supreme compliment of taking it seriously." - Breandán Ó Doibhlín.

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member Nemesiscorporation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Planet earth
    Posts
    14,081
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Thanks for posting that.

    That is a very interesting development

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    3,311
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Why is it not creating a scandal that this site is not being preserved though?

    This is exactly what happened with Wood Quay if I'm not mistaken.

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member Kevin Parlon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    10,192
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I love finds like these. Fascinating to think about how our ancestors lived in these same places we now go about our daily lives. If you haven't been to the national museum in Dublin (2 Kildare street), you're missing out on some awesome (not as in 'cool' but in awe-inspriring) exhibits. One of my favourite activities when I lived in Ireland was to pick ancient monuments from the O/S maps and spend a saturday in pursuit of a good stretch and a look at the site. Wicklow is full of them.

    Archaeology

    Ardagh Hoard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    "It is amazing how many people think that they can answer an argument by attributing bad motives to those who disagree with them." - Thomas Sowell

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,223
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    The more roads we build the more of these things we find!

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •