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Thread: What keeps Ireland's cost of living stubbornly high?

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    Politics.ie Member Disillusioned democrat's Avatar
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    Default What keeps Ireland's cost of living stubbornly high?

    There may be an element of chicken and egg here, but posters here continually use our high cost of living as a reason for high public sector salaries, social welfare, minimum wage, poverty, etc.

    Over 5 years the level of private spending has reduced dramatically, and at the start it looked as if prices were falling broadly in line, but this was short-lived and except for property most other costs stabilised and even rose over the past 4 years.

    I heard an analysts for the motor industry refer to Ireland as Treasure Island last week because of the margins here, and I know the large foreign multiples had to suppress reporting on profit and margins from Ireland for fear that it would bring too much attention to the fact that we were being fleeced.

    Does anyone know why the cost of living remains stubbornly high in Ireland, despite 5 years of recession and more importantly, is there anything we or the government can do about it?

    Until our cost of living reduces we will neither be competitive globally or be able to make significant reductions to public costs, so it would seem to be a real priority for the government, but one that doesn't get much attention.
    The more things change....

  2. #2

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    anywhere remote is expensive. Bermuda, Alaska, Iceland, fiji. Its an island thing.
    How about gender-balance in immigration into ireland ? Is it currently 40 blokes arriving for every 1 woman arriving on these shores ?

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    Politics.ie Member Schomberg's Avatar
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    I was thinking of moving home recently. I was adding up all my costs that I don't currently have. Lets say I make around €2,400 after tax each month. One of my kids will need childcare since my wife wants to work (and I want her to work). We're talking most of her paycheck going to that. Then there's cost of school books etc for the oldest fella. I don't have them right now. Then there's dentist costs, GP visits, health insurance (which i doubt I'd actually get). Reality outside Dublin means you need 2 cars because the buses aren't reliable and too sporadic not to mention extremely expensive. Then there's school lunches that'll need packing every day. That's before I've even started to look at how much basic living costs, like heat, electricity etc etc...it turns out that even though I'm making about €300 less a month at the moment here, I'm about €700 better off a month. Go figure.
    What have British in Ireland contributed to Ireland? Nothing of the scale that the Irish have contributed to Britain. - Runswithwind.

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    Politics.ie Member statsman's Avatar
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    The problem with our cost of living is that it disproportionately affects the poorest 20% of the population. As the OECD say,

    In Ireland, the average person earns 24 156 USD a year, more than the OECD average of 22 387 USD a year. But there is a considerable gap between the richest and poorest – the top 20% of the population earn more than four times as much as the bottom 20%.
    Ireland

    Our prices are pitched at the top 20%, and to hell with the bottom 20%.
    Put a thief among honest men and they will eventually relieve him of his watch. Flann O'Brien

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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    Quite a lot of the problem is the exaggerated rent on commercial property that gets charged -- and paid -- in Ireland.

  6. #6
    Dylan2010
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    Big government thinking its still 2006. Every time you buy something you are feeding an army of civil servants and lobbies.

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    Politics.ie Member Disillusioned democrat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by statsman View Post
    The problem with our cost of living is that it disproportionately affects the poorest 20% of the population. As the OECD say,



    Ireland

    Our prices are pitched at the top 20%, and to hell with the bottom 20%.
    I don't accept that at all - the top 20% don't typically shop in the same places as the bottom 20%, don't compete for houses in the same neighbourhoods, don't drive the same cars, etc., so there should be limited overlap/competition. The must be something more to it than that.
    The more things change....

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    Politics.ie Member Disillusioned democrat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by statsman View Post
    The problem with our cost of living is that it disproportionately affects the poorest 20% of the population. As the OECD say,



    Ireland

    Our prices are pitched at the top 20%, and to hell with the bottom 20%.
    Double post
    The more things change....

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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    The culture of the property owner rather than the entrepreneur.

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    Politics.ie Member statsman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disillusioned democrat View Post
    I don't accept that at all - the top 20% don't typically shop in the same places as the bottom 20%, don't compete for houses in the same neighbourhoods, don't drive the same cars, etc., so there should be limited overlap/competition. The must be something more to it than that.
    The top 20% eat meat, veg, bread, etc. They use the same utilities. They buy the same petrol. Their ability and willingness to pay top prices are a definite inflationary pressure. People on the dole or in minimum wage jobs sure as hell aren't driving prices up.
    Put a thief among honest men and they will eventually relieve him of his watch. Flann O'Brien

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