I must declare an interest and a possible transgression on my own part. Firstly, the author I am going to quote in very brief form is known to me and is a well qualified chap with whom I like to chew in my relatively uneducated way on literary matters over a beer or two.

With the declaration of interest safely out of the way I've been thinking a lot about comparisons between contemporary fiction as laid out by by my learned friend in an article for a quality literary journal (Alluvium Journal) and how Irish contemporary fiction might compare. 'Transgression and contemporary fiction' Transgression and Contemporary Fiction | Alluvium

It occurs to me that Irish and Scottish fiction to a certain extent is shaped by similar cultural experiences- the obvious such as the rich vernacular arising from slang in poverty struck inner cities and the older hangdogs such as the colonial past.

It then occurred to me that I may be more familiar with contemporary Scottish fiction than I am with contemporary Irish fiction which was a somewhat startling and uneasy thought.

My reasons for posting here are multiple- shameless promotion of a good and interesting literary journal, a wish to throw open questions and comparisons between contemporary Irish fiction and Scottish fiction and an underhand attempt to gain some knowledge from people more knowledgeable on contemporary Irish fiction than I that I can throw into the mix the next evening by the fire with pint in hand.

Any thoughts on the similarities or otherwise of the literature of Ireland and Scotland or further afield would be welcome. Are we similar in our social experiences and should our literary output be comparable? I think they were in the past with Swift of Dublin and Robert Louis Stephenson in the noble literary line- but what about the comparative now of recent memory?

Behan and Irvine Welsh, perhaps?

Alluvium Journal; Alluvium | 21st century writing | 21st century approaches