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Thread: In N.I., private sector workers earn 45% less, on average, than those in the public sector

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    Default In N.I., private sector workers earn 45% less, on average, than those in the public sector

    Aside from any reunification debate, surely the economics of this are totally unsustainable going forward. It seems that the gap has only gotten bigger since the signing of the GFA.

    The pay gap between Northern Ireland's public and private sector workers is wider than at any time since the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998.

    The average full-time public sector worker here now earns a staggering 45% more than an employee in the private sector. In the rest of the UK the difference is just 17.8%.
    Furthermore:

    For full-time Northern Ireland employees, wages are on average 44.9% higher in the public than the private sector.
    For full-time female employees, the public sector wages are an astonishing 71.8% higher.
    Public sector wages in Northern Ireland are on average 2.2% higher than rest of the UK.
    Private sector earnings are 18.3% lower than the rest of the UK.
    Executive under fire over public-private pay chasm - Belfast Telegraph

    Half of public expenditure costs in Northern Ireland now go to paying the wages of the public sector.

    It also notes that the average public sector wage in NI is now 30,067 (€37,163), whilst in the private sector it stands at 20,735 (€25,628).

    In comparison, in the UK as a whole, the average public sector wage stands at 23,660 - a difference of almost 7,000 or €8,652 with Northern Ireland.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glaucon View Post
    Aside from any reunification debate, surely the economics of this are totally unsustainable going forward. It seems that the gap has only gotten bigger since the signing of the GFA.



    Furthermore:



    Executive under fire over public-private pay chasm - Northern Ireland, Local & National - Belfasttelegraph.co.uk

    Half of public expenditure costs in Northern Ireland now go to paying the wages of the public sector.

    It also notes that the average public sector wage in NI is now 30,067 (37,163), while in the public sector it is 20,735 (25,628).

    In comparison, in the UK as a whole, the average public sector wage stands at 23,660 - a difference of almost 7,000 or 8,652 with Northern Ireland.
    Here we go again. Attacks from FG on the public sector.

    The right are using the fincial crisis - which was caused by the high paid in the private sector - to attack the hard won conditions of ordinary public sector workers - nurses teachers and other pillars of the public sector.

    Rather than calling for a reduction of pay for the pillars of the public sector we should all be working to improve productivity levels in the private sector working people so that their wages can rise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by factual View Post
    Here we go again. Attacks from FG on the public sector.

    The right are using the fincial crisis - which was caused by the high paid in the private sector - to attack the hard won conditions of ordinary public sector workers - nurses teachers and other pillars of the public sector.

    Rather than calling for a reduction of pay for the pillars of the public sector we should all be working to improve productivity levels in the private sector working people so that their wages can rise.
    I am not in Fine Gael factual (perish the thought), nor do I despise the public sector (many people all around Europe do a sterling job therein every day and we should be thankful for their service). However, it is simply unsustainable to have a situation where 70 per cent of an economy is reliant on the P.S., and, furthermore, those working within that sector earn 45 per cent more than their private sector colleagues.

    I cannot see any justification for such a scandalous gap in earnings, nor for Northern Irish public sector workers earning, on average, so much more than their counterparts in Britain for performing the same tasks. Northern Ireland is a poor region of the U.K. and living costs, are, one would assume, lower than the average too.

    For example:

    An administrative officer in the Civil Service, whose job, according to a careers brochure published by the Northern Ireland Civil Service, involves “data input, file management and dealing with public telephone enquiries”, can earn between 17,348 and 22,180 a year.

    That compares to 12,000 to 15,000 in the private sector, according to the most recent salary survey from recruitment company Brightwater.
    There is absolutely no justification whatever, that I can see, for such a gap in earnings for the same job. If anything, given the guarantee of employment in the public sector, that trend should be reversed.

    The public sector in N.I. is out of control.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glaucon View Post
    I am not in Fine Gael factual (perish the thought), nor do I despise the public sector (many people all around Europe do a sterling job therein every day and we should be thankful for their service). However, it is simply unsustainable to have a situation where 70 per cent of an economy is reliant on the P.S., and, furthermore, those working within that sector earn 45 per cent more than their private sector colleagues.

    I cannot see any justification for such a scandalous gap in earnings, nor for Northern Irish public sector workers earning, on average, so much more than their counterparts in Britain for performing the same tasks. Northern Ireland is a poor region of the U.K. and living costs, are, one would assume, lower than the average too.

    For example:



    There is absolutely no justification whatever, that I can see, for such a gap in earnings for the same job. If anything, given the guarantee of employment in the public sector, that trend should be reversed.

    The public sector in N.I. is out of control.
    I think that building up the private sector is absolutely essential. The main problem in NI is that the private sector has still got a low level of productivity. We need to invest more in university level education and also in training and skills at a more practical level. Nobody should be unemployed between 16 and 18 - everyone should be in some form of training.

    Invest in education and trainin Glaucon is the way to resolve this. Get some large investments from highly productive firms. It will take a lot of work and effort. Just cutting the wages for that low income guy who inputs data (who you cite) seems like the wrong solution - an easy scapegoat.

    I thought you were FG.

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    The public sector in Northern Ireland is a total disgrace. The Executive talks about rebalancing but none of the parties on it are prepared to take measures that would deliver this anytime soon. Sure didn't they once even appoint 4 Victim's Commissioners? It's ridiculous.

    The DUP are scared of losing the public sector vote yet they talk about growing the economy and efficiencies in the public sector. Their record on both isn't too bad but they have no guts to take action on the things that matter and are hamstrung by the need for cross-party support for actions. However, I believe the former is the reason they don't take the necessary action.

    Sinn Fein are a party of big and unsustainable government. They don't talk about rebalancing the economy but focus on relocating public sector jobs into nationalist areas. They talk about Brits in Ireland and yet their policies are the most dependent on "the Brits" funding their views.

    The other parties don't seem to want to rock the boat. There is simply no will to tackle the problems. NI is over-governed and over administered. There needs to be fewer government departments and fewer if any councils, Job losses need to happen instead of moving numbers around and waiting for natural attrition to deliver reductions. Surgical actions needs to happen. Public sector budgets should also be based on a business plan and activity required to deliver objectives, not on last year's budget plus x%. Every February and March departments spend money unnecessarily in order to get the budget next year. But the greatest area of waste is the completely unsustainable pension payments. They are absolutely fukking outrageous. But no one seems to want to talk about that issue.

    The parties have all got their noses in the trough and no one is prepared to do what is right. Any party serious about a single island-state outside the UK needs to tackle this issue head on and not pussy foot around the issue. The two nationalist parties in NI appear to be against smaller government and promote and almost communistic approach to administration here. An island state is a pipe dream that'll never ever happen if they continue with this nonsensical approach.

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    Castle Ray
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    Quote Originally Posted by factual View Post
    The right are using the fincial crisis - which was caused by the high paid in the private sector - to attack the hard won conditions of ordinary public sector workers - nurses teachers and other pillars of the public sector.

    Rather than calling for a reduction of pay for the pillars of the public sector we should all be working to improve productivity levels in the private sector working people so that their wages can rise.
    Productivity levels in the private sector need to increase and the private sector. No doubt about that but the rest of what you write is a load of rubbish. It's very emotive to say that nurses and school teachers are being attacked. They are not being attacked. Nurses and teachers are not the totality of the public sector. There is a huge swathe of administrators and so-called public servants that are doing unnecessary / low-priority jobs at vastly inflated pay rates. These are the people holding back the allocation of funds to nurses and teachers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glaucon View Post
    I am not in Fine Gael factual (perish the thought), nor do I despise the public sector (many people all around Europe do a sterling job therein every day and we should be thankful for their service). However, it is simply unsustainable to have a situation where 70 per cent of an economy is reliant on the P.S., and, furthermore, those working within that sector earn 45 per cent more than their private sector colleagues.

    I cannot see any justification for such a scandalous gap in earnings, nor for Northern Irish public sector workers earning, on average, so much more than their counterparts in Britain for performing the same tasks. Northern Ireland is a poor region of the U.K. and living costs, are, one would assume, lower than the average too.

    For example:



    There is absolutely no justification whatever, that I can see, for such a gap in earnings for the same job. If anything, given the guarantee of employment in the public sector, that trend should be reversed.

    The public sector in N.I. is out of control.
    Agree with all of that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by factual View Post
    I think that building up the private sector is absolutely essential. The main problem in NI is that the private sector has still got a low level of productivity. We need to invest more in university level education and also in training and skills at a more practical level. Nobody should be unemployed between 16 and 18 - everyone should be in some form of training.
    No-one could disagree, but how do you expect people to take the route of entrepreneurship and free enterprise if they earn 45 per cent more in the public sector? It's totally unjust and something needs to be done, quickly.

    There is absolutely no justification, none, for someone in the public sector who inputs data into a computer earning 3 or 4 thousands pounds more than someone who does this in the private sector.

    Half of all expenditure in Northern Ireland now goes on paying wages for the public sector! Surely neither you nor Sinn Fein can support this going forward - it's unsustainable for British taxpayers, never mind for Irish ones.

    Imagine someone sitting in Oxford or Reading (or Antrim, for that matter) and working hard in their own shop, or coffee house, or entry level private sector job - do you think they would be content to pay for public sector workers in Belfast or Ballymena to earn such out of control wages, wages that their tax dollars (or pounds) are paying for? I know I wouldn't.

    Quote Originally Posted by factual
    Invest in education and trainin Glaucon is the way to resolve this. Get some large investments from highly productive firms. It will take a lot of work and effort. Just cutting the wages for that low income guy who inputs data (who you cite) seems like the wrong solution - an easy scapegoat.
    The economy in Northern Ireland needs rebalancing toward the private sector - as long as there is a 45 per cent pay gap between the public and private sectors, this, quite logically, won't happen.

    Why go for a private sector job, when you can opt for a job for life with the government and vastly superior wages?

  9. #9
    Castle Ray
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    It is considered entrepreneurial to get a job in the public sector or work a move to get as many of the array of welfare payments as possible. That is the road to no town but when anyone tries to correct that unsustainable situation, lefties cry "Tory cuts!" and claim that the right hates the poor and that the emotive teachers and nurses are being attacked. Pathetic.

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    Sinn Fein are entirely dishonest on this topic, as are the DUP and the rest. All are happy to ride the gravy train to oblivion, hoping that taxpayers in Britain don't cast their eye westward and examine what is going on in the province. Perhaps that will continue, but it should not - Northern Ireland is the most dependant part of the UK, benefiting from central government expenditure and funds from the EU; the region needs to be using all this cash to build toward something sustainable, not merely administrative jobs that pay 45 per cent more than their private sector equivalents.

    factual's comment of ''attacking the hard won conditions of ordinary public sector workers'' is indicative. No-one disputes that ambulance drivers, doctors, nurses etc. should be paid well, but there is no justification for public sector fat cats doing useless jobs and being paid crazy money for doing so. If there isn't uproar over this story next week in the Assembly, it'll be a indictment on the mentality prevailing there.

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