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Thread: What is the policy of the Gaelscoileanna on admission of pupils?

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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    Default What is the policy of the Gaelscoileanna on admission of pupils?

    I've been having a conversation with an old friend of mine this evening. She's been through the secondary school system through Irish and is working parttime (and often voluntarily) in helping adult students to learn Irish.

    Her credentials, in short, are irrewhatdoyamacallitable.

    She has been relating that some people of her acquaintance (not me) have been trying to get their children into school with a number of different gaelscoilleanna in the Dubbelin area.

    She tells me the response is that there are two criteria for entering Gaelscoileanna where there is a shortage of places:

    1) If the child already has a sibling in the school.
    2) If the child is in a family where Irish is spoken at home.

    Now criterion (1) seems fine. I'm a little unsure about criterion (2) (if indeed it applies).

    I have a total of three questions on this subject:

    A) Are these indeed the criteria used by the gaelscoileanna for admittance into a one of their schools when there is a shortage?
    and, if so:

    B) Is Criterion 2 compatible with their purpose of promoting use of the Irish language in all sections of Irish society?
    C) Is Criterion 2 compatible with the applicable law on discrimination against particular ethnic groups?

    The answer to (A) may be no, in which case this thread is likely to have a very short life expectancy, and if it is yes, the (B) might have some very defensible answers.

    What are posters' thoughts on Question (C)?

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    Politics.ie Member 'orebel's Avatar
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    Criterion 1 is accurate (or at least applies in the Gaelscoil my kids attend).
    Criterion 2 is catchment area.
    That is all.
    "It is important therefore that I clarify to the House that in the first instance there are significant monies within Anglo-Irish to take the strain of loan losses arising over the next three or four years, before State support is engaged." Brian Lenihan 15/01/09

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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 'orebel View Post
    Criterion 1 is accurate (or at least applies in the Gaelscoil my kids attend).
    Criterion 2 is catchment area.
    That is all.
    Thank you for the information.

    So criterion 2, as I have characterised it, is incorrect?

    To be honest, I was hoping that was the case.

    I'm not at all hostile to the gaelscoil movement. On the contrary.

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    Politics.ie Member ger12's Avatar
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    Why would you object to children being raised with Irish at home having an increased chance of accessing a Gaelscoil?
    At 12 weeks the “clump of cells” toes curl, her mouth makes sucking movements, she has a human face and if you prod the tummy she will move in response

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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ger12 View Post
    Why would you object to children being raised with Irish at home having an increased chance of accessing a Gaelscoil?
    Wouldn't that be a de facto barrier to the entry of children of immigrants?

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    Politics.ie Member 'orebel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toland View Post
    Thank you for the information.

    So criterion 2, as I have characterised it, is incorrect?


    To be honest, I was hoping that was the case.

    I'm not at all hostile to the gaelscoil movement. On the contrary.
    I know for a fact that it doesn't exist at our local school. I can't speak for others but it would seem to be a strange requirement.
    "It is important therefore that I clarify to the House that in the first instance there are significant monies within Anglo-Irish to take the strain of loan losses arising over the next three or four years, before State support is engaged." Brian Lenihan 15/01/09

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    Quote Originally Posted by ger12 View Post
    Why would you object to children being raised with Irish at home having an increased chance of accessing a Gaelscoil?
    Because all children should have equal opportunity of access to all State-funded schools. Otherwise the elitism of which these schools are sometimes accused might become a reality.

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    Politics.ie Member Boy M5's Avatar
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    I think the criteria is wider depending on the school. I know of kids from non Gaelgoir homes in a gaelscoil also another school I know has intake with a large non Irish citizen intake.
    "Keep firing & don't stop until I tell you" General Tom Barry

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    Politics.ie Member Telemachus's Avatar
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    To a liberal lad like Toland, non-discrimination is the highest concern. The highest principle that society should be organised around.

    So here hes attacking what he sees as non application of that. Pathetic.
    ..the Irish nation can become other than white, by privileging the voices of the racialised and subverting state immigration but also integration policies. – Ronit Lentin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toland View Post
    Wouldn't that be a de facto barrier to the entry of children of immigrants?
    Be serious. How many immigrants would want their children to learn Irish. Most of them couldn't care less if they don't even learn to speak English. To claim social welfare all you need is to scribble your name.

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