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Thread: Are the EU and US still screwing up food production in Africa?

  1. #1
    Dylan2010
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    Default Are the EU and US still screwing up food production in Africa?

    I happened to catch an interview on RTE with one of the Irish creameries and they seemed to be pleased with themselves that they were exporting a 100m of powered milk to be shipped to Nigeria to be then rehydraded and sold to Nigerian consumers. As European farmers live off taxpayer grants it means that their production price is artificially low. On the Nigerian side these subsidised imports make it less attractive to get into dairy farming and related manufacturing? either that or Nigerian farmers are so useless that the EU is doing them a favour?
    there have been many examples in the past where EU exports meant that African farmers were leaving crops in the ground, is it still going on?



    Agricultural Products; Reinvent Rebuild

    Most of Nigeria’s dairy imports are lower-grade milk powder. Nigeria’s dairy processors (including ice cream, chocolate milk, yogurt, and long-life milk producers) rely on combining and reconstituting milk powder imported mostly from the Netherlands and Denmark. Despite a huge market, U.S. market share for dairy products remains insignificant as freight costs from the U.S. are well above those from the European Union. The U.S. should take advantage of its more efficient dairy processing over third country suppliers to control market share for high-value dairy products such as cheese, ice cream, butter and others.

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    Politics.ie Member Telemachus's Avatar
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    Are you saying that Irish famers due to their engagement with CAP are morally complicit in damaging african economies?
    ..the Irish nation can become other than white, by privileging the voices of the racialised and subverting state immigration but also integration policies. – Ronit Lentin

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    Politics.ie Member Picasso Republic's Avatar
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    Investment in commercial farming in Africa is an issue, as long as we are content to see the subsistence farmer on his 2 acre farm there will always be a problem with large scale production.

    However one has to ask the question whether Nigeria is suitable for large scale dairy production or should they focus on say grain, rice etc. what will give them the biggest bang for their buck.

    Additionally, Africa is still high risk for foreign companies partnering locals, as a change in regime to a Zimbabwe model could see large assets and years of investment wiped out.

    However overall the OP raised a valid point.

  4. #4
    Dylan2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Telemachus View Post
    Are you saying that Irish famers due to their engagement with CAP are morally complicit in damaging african economies?
    I'm suggesting it or kicking the types at least. It is certainly provable that European farmers were complicit in the past but I'm not sure how much the EU has cleaned up its act since.


    Quote Originally Posted by Picasso Republic
    However one has to ask the question whether Nigeria is suitable for large scale dairy production or should they focus on say grain, rice etc. what will give them the biggest bang for their buck.
    thats a possibility but I'm still curious how a high cost country and sell a low cost commodity to low income consumers on a different continent? the economics of that must be fascinating. Or what market failures are preventing Nigerian farmers from organising via coops or other mechanisms. Is there gov corruption financed by the EU or Euopean multinationals?

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    Politics.ie Royalty toxic avenger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Telemachus View Post
    Are you saying that Irish famers due to their engagement with CAP are morally complicit in damaging african economies?
    Up to their eyeballs in complicity (and it's not just Africa) - their bleating is why Ireland has always been at the forefront of defending CAP and blocking meaningful reform, them and the French.

    CAP is EVIL...

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    Em, of course they are,

    The EU and the US also drop bombs on them,

    Just sayin is all!

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    Politics.ie Royalty toxic avenger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan2010 View Post
    I'm suggesting it or kicking the types at least. It is certainly provable that European farmers were complicit in the past but I'm not sure how much the EU has cleaned up its act since.
    Attempts at reform have been half-hearted or watered down. They have, in fairness, allowed relatively unrestricted access to EU markets for the most undeveloped countries, partially breaching 'Fortress Europe' (good in as far as it goes) but one gets the impression of a fig-leaf to cover the criticism that CAP has attracted for decades now. The main problems remain, particularly dumping and market distortion, as well as lack of access to the 'middling' poor countries.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan2010 View Post
    I happened to catch an interview on RTE with one of the Irish creameries and they seemed to be pleased with themselves that they were exporting a 100m of powered milk to be shipped to Nigeria to be then rehydraded and sold to Nigerian consumers. As European farmers live off taxpayer grants it means that their production price is artificially low. On the Nigerian side these subsidised imports make it less attractive to get into dairy farming and related manufacturing? either that or Nigerian farmers are so useless that the EU is doing them a favour?
    there have been many examples in the past where EU exports meant that African farmers were leaving crops in the ground, is it still going on?



    Agricultural Products; Reinvent Rebuild
    If anything CAP has driven up the price of milk powder in the EU as opposed to putting downward pressure on it. Particularly due to the imposition of milk quotas which limited production.

    Many dairy farmers do not have large single farm payments because they were not involved in the business of finishing beef cattle bred from their dairy cows.

    You also have the reality now that the CAP is no longer linked to production, it has in fact reduced production as can be seen by the marked decrease in the Irish cattle herd.

    If CAP was scrapped large amounts of land retained by beef producers purely for the purpose of drawing subsidies based on historic production rates that they no longer match would be become available for dairy. With the milk quota going in 2015 this would actually see even more pressure on African farmers.

    If you don't believe me look at the New Zealand model which is the one I personally advocate for Ireland, and its entirely subsidy free.
    "If we can but prevent the government from wasting the labours of the people, under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy." - Thomas Jefferson

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    GDPR Deleted
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    So we are subsidising African food supplies so that they cost less for impoverished Africans than if they produced it themselves ? is that one way of looking at it ?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by fionnmccool View Post
    So we are subsidising African food supplies so that they cost less for impoverished Africans than if they produced it themselves ? is that one way of looking at it ?
    When subsidies were linked to production we were, if anything the manner in which the single farm payment is made now it is a hindrance to production.
    "If we can but prevent the government from wasting the labours of the people, under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy." - Thomas Jefferson

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