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Thread: Irish health care spending at 11.4% of national income is now high by international standards but risk of major service breakdowns

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    Default Irish health care spending at 11.4% of national income is now high by international standards but risk of major service breakdowns

    See Ireland’s health spending among highest in OECD ∑ TheJournal.ie

    This 11.4% figure is high by international standards. So hypochondriac public sector advocates shouldn't disingenuously quote the lower percentage of spending to GDP without mentioning that Irish GDP uniquely is overstated by about 20 to 25% due to multinational financial transactions.

    Given this high spending,the government should be well able to maintain front line services. But given the news reports of withdrawal of services from very vulnerable elderly people and disabled children,and in view of the hundreds of millions budget deficit in the HSE budget,what chance is there of avoiding major service breakdowns?

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    Politics.ie Member commonman's Avatar
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    I think the cuts will be on the front line services especially when you have a minster that has not got a clue what he at, he will look for the easy way out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by commonman View Post
    I think the cuts will be on the front line services especially when you have a minster that has not got a clue what he at, he will look for the easy way out.
    His naming in Stubbs Gazette,a major public financial embarrassment,doesn't inspire confidence in his financial management.

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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    See Irelandís health spending among highest in OECD ∑ TheJournal.ie

    This 11.4% figure is high by international standards. So hypochondriac public sector advocates shouldn't disingenuously quote the lower percentage of spending to GDP without mentioning that Irish GDP uniquely is overstated by about 20 to 25% due to multinational financial transactions.

    Given this high spending,the government should be well able to maintain front line services. But given the news reports of withdrawal of services from very vulnerable elderly people and disabled children,and in view of the hundreds of millions budget deficit in the HSE budget,what chance is there of avoiding major service breakdowns?
    Couple of things

    1. 3 years ago is not now, at the time the economy was contracting rapidly, the health spend has contracted since.

    2. Health inflation has led to 32% per annum increase in private insurance rates, while public health spend has been cut by 2.5 billion.

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    Politics.ie Member dunno's Avatar
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    If that is the current figure, or the current figure is any way close, Irish healthcare is notably inefficient, but that is one of the obvious things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dunno View Post
    If that is the current figure, or the current figure is any way close, Irish healthcare is notably inefficient, but that is one of the obvious things.
    Not the current figure, 3 years old.
    Report is a year old.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nakatomi View Post
    Couple of things

    1. 3 years ago is not now, at the time the economy was contracting rapidly, the health spend has contracted since.

    2. Health inflation has led to 32% per annum increase in private insurance rates, while public health spend has been cut by 2.5 billion.
    So why is there still a deficit of hundreds of millions that must be closed ASAP?

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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    So why is there still a deficit of hundreds of millions that must be closed ASAP?
    The deficit is because there has been a budget cut , of 2.5 billion, and medical inflation runs over 16%.
    Staff have been cut , pay has been cut.
    care has been cut , waiting times increased.
    You now could wait 4 years to see a consultant and another 4 years ( 8 in total) for a hip replacement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    See Irelandís health spending among highest in OECD ∑ TheJournal.ie

    This 11.4% figure is high by international standards. So hypochondriac public sector advocates shouldn't disingenuously quote the lower percentage of spending to GDP without mentioning that Irish GDP uniquely is overstated by about 20 to 25% due to multinational financial transactions.

    Given this high spending,the government should be well able to maintain front line services. But given the news reports of withdrawal of services from very vulnerable elderly people and disabled children,and in view of the hundreds of millions budget deficit in the HSE budget,what chance is there of avoiding major service breakdowns?
    please please get your terms right. GDP is not national income and Ireland's GDP is overstated compared to other countries, the Irish economy doesnt own the transfer pricing etc that bumps up GDP and "as a % of GDP" tends to be used by spivs that want higher spending for their particular lobby.

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    The spend may seem high but link it with the top heavy admin, consultants double jobbing, malpractice suits and general wastage there is little left to fund front line services.

    If rationalised the money paid into the HSE would provide us all a much better service and we would not have our weekly Sindo/SBP 'HSE ate my hamster' exclusives.

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