Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 98

Thread: Low Morale among SNP troops as party faces referendum campaign: Alex's star has slipped

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Bloomsbury, Central London
    Posts
    8,750
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Low Morale among SNP troops as party faces referendum campaign: Alex's star has slipped

    Alex Salmond faces a sceptical nation - FT.com

    Fascinating story in the FT describing the low morale among the SNP activists in Glasgow.

    For a while SNP was able to ride the waves but now activists are asking questions about Alex Salmond, and expressing disappointment that he is not moving on. He is making the same old speech to party conference.


    Last Tuesday may have been the worst day in the first minister’s 25-year political career. It began with the news that two of his MSPs were resigning over the party’s decision to drop its decades-long opposition to remaining in Nato – a reversal Mr Salmond backed to move the SNP further into the mainstream.
    That news was compounded when, Nicola Sturgeon, his deputy, revealed that contrary to earlier suggestions, the Scottish government had no legal advice that justified its assertion that the country could remain in the EU after independence. Not only had Mr Salmond suggested such advice had been sought and given long ago but the Scottish government had spent £12,000 of taxpayers’ money on a legal challenge to prevent having to disclose its contents.
    Ms Sturgeon’s statement triggered a hostile reaction in the Scottish press. The Scottish Sun, which supported the SNP in 2011, ran a front-page headline branding Mr Salmond: “EU Liar”.
    So is this the low point of his five-year rule as first minister?

    That said, it may be too soon to write him off as he has come back before:

    Mr Salmond is powered by a sense of being able to defeat the odds, say friends, which was further fuelled by overturning the polls in last year’s Holyrood elections.
    This conviction he can achieve the politically impossible by sheer force of his own personality makes him remarkably resilient. When he stood down from the party leadership in 2000 amid bitter criticism of his “dictatorial” style, his career seemed over. Yet four years later, just months after saying he would not run again for the leadership, he was back at the SNP helm. Three years after that he was first minister.
    Last edited by factual; 27th October 2012 at 11:09 AM.

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member statsman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    53,746
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by factual View Post
    Alex Salmond faces a sceptical nation - FT.com

    Fascinating story in the FT describing the low morale among the SNP activists in Glasgow.

    For a while SNP was able to ride the waves but now activists are asking questions about Alex Salmond, and expressing disappointment that he is not moving on. He is making the same old speech to party conference.
    Given the likelihood of the referendum falling, Salmond is on his last lap anyway. Labour may well benefit.
    Put a thief among honest men and they will eventually relieve him of his watch. Flann O'Brien

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Bloomsbury, Central London
    Posts
    8,750
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by statsman View Post
    Given the likelihood of the referendum falling, Salmond is on his last lap anyway. Labour may well benefit.
    The article points out that Alex Salmond left the referendum negotiations with David Cameron to his deputy Nichola Surgeon so that if the referendum fails he can blame her.

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,961
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by factual View Post
    The article points out that Alex Salmond left the referendum negotiations with David Cameron to his deputy Nichola Surgeon so that if the referendum fails he can blame her.
    Positively DeValera-ish...

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member TheWexfordInn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    12,029
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    From the same article. It reckons that Salmond won his 2011 SNP majority too soon, his 2011 electoral triumph could ironically have been the death knell to any short term hopes for Scotland's independence.

    .. once he won a majority in 2011, he had little option but to call a referendum. The arch-gradualist was forced by his own success to take the last step on the path to independence earlier than he might have wished.
    “2011 was his greatest victory,” says Mr Torrance. “It may also have been the worst thing that could have happened to his political career.”

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member statsman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    53,746
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hiker View Post
    Positively DeValera-ish...
    But for the fact that Dev didn't have to face Labour and the Tories in the next GE. Labour look to be on the rise in Scotland again, and are, ironically, best placed to capitalise on Scottish Unionism.
    Put a thief among honest men and they will eventually relieve him of his watch. Flann O'Brien

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member statsman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    53,746
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by factual View Post
    The article points out that Alex Salmond left the referendum negotiations with David Cameron to his deputy Nichola Surgeon so that if the referendum fails he can blame her.
    He can, but many will blame him among the electorate.
    Put a thief among honest men and they will eventually relieve him of his watch. Flann O'Brien

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member Portadown madman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    * snigger*

  9. #9

    Default

    The one really good thing coming from the referendum is that Scots are getting a chance to see and really examine what kind of government they would get if they vote for independence and compare it to what they have had for centuries. If you are going to discard a system that has served you well and brought stability for so long, then you need to be pretty certain that whatever replaces it is as good if not better.

    That's a marked contrast to our mistakes of almost a hundred years. There was no vision, let alone proper debate of what would replace our position in the U.K. and once Home Rule was off the table, a vacuum was created where two factions of Irish nationalism that had little or no long term differences filled it. With no major policy differences, we created a political system that was dominated by the cult of personality and the party that produced the bigger personalities generally did better.
    Thank you for the six thousand likes.

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Bloomsbury, Central London
    Posts
    8,750
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith-M View Post
    The one really good thing coming from the referendum is that Scots are getting a chance to see and really examine what kind of government they would get if they vote for independence and compare it to what they have had for centuries. If you are going to discard a system that has served you well and brought stability for so long, then you need to be pretty certain that whatever replaces it is as good if not better.

    That's a marked contrast to our mistakes of almost a hundred years. There was no vision, let alone proper debate of what would replace our position in the U.K. and once Home Rule was off the table, a vacuum was created where two factions of Irish nationalism that had little or no long term differences filled it. With no major policy differences, we created a political system that was dominated by the cult of personality and the party that produced the bigger personalities generally did better.
    That may or may not be true but Sinn Féin's rise is introducing a new dimension into our politics and hopefully the old "two factions" system is being brought to an end.

Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •