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Thread: Irish Hunger Memorial - NYC

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    Politics.ie Member Hogsback's Avatar
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    Default Irish Hunger Memorial - NYC

    Apologies if this has come up before, but I wanted to mention the 'Irish Hunger Memorial' in NYC.
    I had occasion to be in Manhattan at the weekend with the family, and we quite literally stumbled across it yesterday afternoon.

    The kids wanted to go to the Ground Zero Memorial, so we headed off Sunday morning to the little museum beside ground zero and spent some time there before heading over to the memorial itself.
    Both are worth a visit. The museum is very sad - especially the multitude of posters that are displayed of still missing loved ones that were put up by families after the attack.

    Anyway, while walking back to the car park we discovered an Irish famine memorial just a couple of minutes walk from ground zero. It's on a massive slab overlooking the Hudson and recreates a little sloped path up from a ruined cottage.
    The grass and vegetation look like they are native to Ireland, and an engraved rock from each county sits along the slope. I think the cottage was actually moved stone by stone from Mayo.
    It gives the effect of a chunk if earth which has been torn up and placed in the middle of Manhattan.

    At the top of the path you can see the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, and a good portion of lower Manhattan.
    I thought it was beautiful, so if you are in the area think about dropping by.
    Bring a cup of tea to enjoy while you sit on a rock and take in the strange combination of scenery.

    Irish Hunger Memorial - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    I didn't have a chance to check this out the last time I visited New York but I'll have a look next time. Seems very poignant, good to see more international awareness of the famine.

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    Politics.ie Member ruserious's Avatar
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    I happened to just come across it too earlier in the year on the way back from Battery park. Amazing little place.
    Boycott the "Irish" Sun rag.

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    Politics.ie Member emulator's Avatar
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    I went to see it when it opened in 2002. It's an amazing place to visit. It also has lots of inscriptions around the sides in the black marble. IIRC it's just a block North from the WTC. We were on a family holiday and had walked up the lower West side of Manhattan to have a look at G0, which was a very sombre experience, and then headed up to the Famine Memorial. I'm not sure if that added to the experience of the Memorial itself but I could've spent the day there easily....

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    Politics.ie Member Gracchus's Avatar
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    Visited this in September, along with the one in Philly while over in Boston for the summer. The Boston one is simply, with two statues, one of a very impoverished and ragged Irish family who just arrived in Boston, the other is an Irish family after spending some time here, they are strong and happy looking. It is right in downtown Boston, in a pretty busy area, doesn't really suit the area, would be better in one of the parks in Boston tbh, worth a visit though.
    The Philly one is right next to Penn's Landing, great location over looking water and the Benjamin Franklin Bridge. It gives a brief history of the famine and the Irish in America on about 8 different stone slabs. In the center you have a large statue, on one side it has scenes from Ireland, on the other side it has people arriving of a ship into the US. A more of a fitting memorial compared with the Boston one.

    The New York one is probably the most striking and impressive. Very sad and emotional place, invoking the memories of the people who came from all parts of Ireland to escape the famine. While I was there, it had to do it didn't it? it started lashing rain, so ye it really was like a scene from Mayo that day.
    “The French Revolution was nothing but a precursor of another revolution, one that will be bigger, more solemn, and which will be the last.” Babeuf

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    Yes, saw it 8 years ago and thought it was excellent and told the story well.

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    Politics.ie Member Hogsback's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gracchus View Post
    Visited this in September, along with the one in Philly while over in Boston for the summer. The Boston one is simply, with two statues, one of a very impoverished and ragged Irish family who just arrived in Boston, the other is an Irish family after spending some time here, they are strong and happy looking. It is right in downtown Boston, in a pretty busy area, doesn't really suit the area, would be better in one of the parks in Boston tbh, worth a visit though.
    The Philly one is right next to Penn's Landing, great location over looking water and the Benjamin Franklin Bridge. It gives a brief history of the famine and the Irish in America on about 8 different stone slabs. In the center you have a large statue, on one side it has scenes from Ireland, on the other side it has people arriving of a ship into the US. A more of a fitting memorial compared with the Boston one.

    The New York one is probably the most striking and impressive. Very sad and emotional place, invoking the memories of the people who came from all parts of Ireland to escape the famine. While I was there, it had to do it didn't it? it started lashing rain, so ye it really was like a scene from Mayo that day.
    Can you recommend anything else to see/avoid in Boston? - will hopefully be there soon.

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    Politics.ie Member Hogsback's Avatar
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    The whole Battery are has been evacuated for hurricane Sandy I believe- a good portion is now flooded.

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    Moderator NYCKY's Avatar
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    I remember it was officially opened by Mary McAleese and even that had been delayed as a result of the 9/11 attacks (as noted in the OP its right downtown). I always meant to see it but like other posters literally stumbled across it a couple of years.

    I thought it was very well done and while simple very effective. Definitely worth a visit.

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    Politics.ie Member former wesleyan's Avatar
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    But why the American spelling. In quotation marks ?
    "What Michael Collins accepted in '22,De Valera accepted in'27 and Gerry Adams accepted in '98.Sooner or later they all come around to accepting the Treaty"

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