Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Ghost estates: Ireland and UK

  1. #1

    Default Ghost estates: Ireland and UK

    Ghosts sprawling all over Ireland and US. But not much UK (I could be wrong). Why is not UK much prevalent as we have here? Especially in UK media.

    Any idea?
    Signature censored!

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member FreshStart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    704
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I bought a house in 2001 for E285,000. It was an ex-rental and in pretty bad condition. I couldn't afford a house in the same estate that was around the corner because it was in good condition. Since purchasing, I installed a new kitchen and bathroom and put in wooden floors etc (probably about E16,000 in refurbishment). I since sold the house two years ago. Today, I have noticed the house next door to mine is for sale for E345,000. This house was always owner-occupied and in superb walk-in condition. This isn't a whinge, merely a practical demonstration of how house prices have fallen. The real boom ended in 2001. Everything after that was a fallacy.

  3. #3

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member Squire Allworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Usually on the move.
    Posts
    1,404
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bananarepublic.ie View Post
    Ghosts sprawling all over Ireland and US. But not much UK (I could be wrong). Why is not UK much prevalent as we have here? Especially in UK media.

    Any idea?
    There are housing shortages across much of the UK.

    Median earnings are around £530 per week (male). £27560 per year. 3.5 times salary is around £100,000. So with deposit and perhaps a second earner a house as below is affordable.

    3 bed house for sale, Sunningdale Drive, Boston - Ref:5455207

    It is an average enough house in Lincolnshire and just chosen at random.

    In the UK high end houses are selling, but what is missing from the market is first time house buyers.

    By the way I predict a chronic house shortage developing in N.Ireland. Housing starts there (and other regions) are about 40% of what is needed. Major problem in the making.

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    160
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bananarepublic.ie View Post
    Ghosts sprawling all over Ireland and US. But not much UK (I could be wrong). Why is not UK much prevalent as we have here? Especially in UK media.

    Any idea?
    Because planning laws are much, much stricter in the UK. Local councils across the water actually seek to preserve the essence of their towns and villages rather than ruin them by taking back-handers from developers and then giving these developers permission to build shoddy housing estates and horrible little shopping precincts. Seriously, if you drive from Dublin to Cork and look out of your car window, it's like a kid has let loose with his lego set.

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member Squire Allworthy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Usually on the move.
    Posts
    1,404
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jakey View Post
    Seriously, if you drive from Dublin to Cork and look out of your car window, it's like a kid has let loose with his lego set.
    +1

    Very poor planning and not much money spent on the design.

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Ill take a house , I have been on the waiting list for 6 years and near to where I'm living ATM there is a whole estate with 100 empty houses which is now owned by NAMA and the county council are proposing to knock it down

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    the equivalent of Ceaucescu's Romania
    Posts
    624
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jakey View Post
    Because planning laws are much, much stricter in the UK. Local councils across the water actually seek to preserve the essence of their towns and villages rather than ruin them by taking back-handers from developers and then giving these developers permission to build shoddy housing estates and horrible little shopping precincts. Seriously, if you drive from Dublin to Cork and look out of your car window, it's like a kid has let loose with his lego set.
    Just back from Oxfordshire. My God, how beautiful it is. Proper planning in evidence.

    England has housing shortages because it is so densely populated. Is it the most densely populated country in Europe now?

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member yellowfish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    ireland
    Posts
    3,758
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by godwins View Post
    Ill take a house , I have been on the waiting list for 6 years and near to where I'm living ATM there is a whole estate with 100 empty houses which is now owned by NAMA and the county council are proposing to knock it down

    We have a house we can not sell, would love to trade up, why dont nama take some part exchange deals, at least get som money back and benefit the people paying for this mess.

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    8,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by White Rose View Post
    Just back from Oxfordshire. My God, how beautiful it is. Proper planning in evidence.
    I've been living in Oxfordshire for the past 5 years, and yes it is beautiful.
    There is proper planning, and locals do take an interest and have a voice when new developments are proposed. Last year there was a move to build a few hundred houses in a field on the edge of the town where I live. This was proposed by the county council, but as soon as it broke in the local paper, there was serious opposition. The field in question was owned by the council and informally used as a park, but the local town town council immediately were able to officially zone it as a park or amenity area, and the housing development was knocked on the head.

    That said, someone has got permission to knock down two bungalows at the end of my road and build 7 apartments on the spot, despite a lot of local opposition.

    Anyway, it's beautiful countryside round here but you do pay for it. That house in Lincolnshire mentioned above,
    3 bed house for sale, Sunningdale Drive, Boston - Ref:5455207, would cost about 3 times that price round here.

    That's why we're renting.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •