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Thread: The Emigration Advice thread

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    Politics.ie Member Schomberg's Avatar
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    Default The Emigration Advice thread

    I may be joining people on the ferries in the not to distant future (did I just hear some cheers?) so i thought maybe those of you who've already up and left might be able to offer some advice to people going or thinking of going abroad?

    It'll be the UK or some other English speaking country for me. Canada if a visa comes through. The thought of going to a place and having a language to master just doesn't sit well with me. I'd imagine I'm not alone on this.

    So, any advise on moving to mainland UK or abroad? Trying to find a job before you leave seems like an impossibilty if you're not some outrageously well trained university graduate..
    What have British in Ireland contributed to Ireland? Nothing of the scale that the Irish have contributed to Britain. - Runswithwind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schomberg View Post
    I may be joining people on the ferries in the not to distant future (did I just hear some cheers?) so i thought maybe those of you who've already up and left might be able to offer some advice to people going or thinking of going abroad?

    It'll be the UK or some other English speaking country for me. Canada if a visa comes through. The thought of going to a place and having a language to master just doesn't sit well with me. I'd imagine I'm not alone on this.

    So, any advise on moving to mainland UK or abroad? Trying to find a job before you leave seems like an impossibilty if you're not some outrageously well trained university graduate..
    Do not require English to live in Holland or most of northern Europe if the job is in English (i.e. science/engineering). You do need the local language if you are doing the trades however.
    Electrical capacity=electrical generation
    In the understanding of SirCharles Post #573 "Bloomberg...renewables"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schomberg View Post
    I may be joining people on the ferries in the not to distant future (did I just hear some cheers?) so i thought maybe those of you who've already up and left might be able to offer some advice to people going or thinking of going abroad?

    It'll be the UK or some other English speaking country for me. Canada if a visa comes through. The thought of going to a place and having a language to master just doesn't sit well with me. I'd imagine I'm not alone on this.

    So, any advise on moving to mainland UK or abroad? Trying to find a job before you leave seems like an impossibilty if you're not some outrageously well trained university graduate..
    My advice is to stay in Ireland and help to fight the vermin oligarchy.

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    Lots of friends/family living in Britain, visit there regularly - horrible place to live, loads of hidden taxes and charges, public services very poor, lots of aggressive attitudes to be waded through on a daily basis.

    Canada now, that's a whole different matter, Toronto and Vancouver are great cities.

    I feel you are cutting yourself off from a much more positive and enriching experience by ruling out the Continent though. Depends on your line of work but fluency in a local language is not always required - English is after all the universal language of business. Netherlands, Germany or Switzerland would be the obvious choices here.

    Or for the truly exotic, Japan's demographics have opened up a fair few opportunities for an ambitious young gaijin.

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    Politics.ie Member Interista's Avatar
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    Depends on your line of work but fluency in a local language is not always required - English is after all the universal language of business. Netherlands, Germany or Switzerland would be the obvious choices here.
    English may be 'the universal language of business' but Dutch is the language of the Netherlands, GErman is the language of Germany, and so on. Of course most educated people in these countries speak very good English, but that doesn't mean they're happy to function in English for the benefit of a foreign worker. Of course, there are jobs where you genuinely don't need to know the local language, but I'd imagine you'd have to have some pretty sought-after credentials to persuade a Dutch or Swiss employer to take you on with no knowledge of the local language.

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    Living in France, have lived in Germany, Spain and Holland.

    My advice to you would be to stay in Ireland if it's at all possible. I've yet to find a country to match it, even with the weather. If you're obliged to leave however, then the best idea would be to find a country which best resembles the kind of place you like living in (urban or rural, are available services in your local proximity a priority etc. etc.) That could be anything from rural Australia, to urban Edmonton.

    The choice is, obviously, yours to make.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Interista View Post
    English may be 'the universal language of business' but Dutch is the language of the Netherlands, GErman is the language of Germany, and so on. Of course most educated people in these countries speak very good English, but that doesn't mean they're happy to function in English for the benefit of a foreign worker. Of course, there are jobs where you genuinely don't need to know the local language, but I'd imagine you'd have to have some pretty sought-after credentials to persuade a Dutch or Swiss employer to take you on with no knowledge of the local language.
    I worked in Switzerland for 6 months a few years back with not a word of German, in IT.

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    I'd recommend any of the big US cities...Boston, New York, Chicago...

    Or if you're looking for something less traditionally Irish look at Denver or Charelston. Still, if you're going to either of these I'd recommend having a job before you go. Actually I'd recommend that same for any of the first three unless you can swing a hurley, kick a football or are US qualified in a profession.

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    Politics.ie Member Interista's Avatar
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    I worked in Switzerland for 6 months a few years back with not a word of German, in IT.
    Good for you. I didn't say it wasn't possible to get a job without speaking the language, just that you need very sought-after skills to do so. Unless you have skills which can't be found in the host country, you'll likely have a hard time competing with locals who speak the local language, in addition to English and often one or more other languages too.

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    Don't ever come back. I came back to Ireland after 20 years away, and have regretted every second of it.

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