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Thread: How long until the patience of workers in Ireland runs out?

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    Politics.ie Member making waves's Avatar
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    Default How long until the patience of workers in Ireland runs out?

    by Joe Higgins, Socialist Party MEP

    The economic establishment wants to turn Irish workers into the “coolies” of Western Europe – low paid, working long hours and in general at the beck and call of their masters.

    This has also been the thrust of the propaganda campaign against public sector workers in certain media for a period of years. This propaganda suggests that the public sector is heavily overstaffed and that public sector workers are massively overpaid. The true facts are conveniently ignored.

    In 2008, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published a report on the Irish public sector which gives the lie to the propaganda claims. The Report states, “As compared with other OECD countries, 2005 data indicate that general employment in Ireland…is relatively low among OECD countries and is significantly less that the level of public employment in Norway, Sweden, France, Finland and Belgium.” Again the Report states, “Government policy therefore has actually decreased the total number of public sector employees as a percentage of the labour force and decreased the overall public sector wage bill as a percentage of GDP.” Again, “The public sector workforce, excluding commercial state sponsored bodies, is relatively low compared with other OECD countries, and significantly less that the level of public employment in Norway, Sweden, France, Finland and Belgium.” So much then for the “bloated public sector”, a phrase much loved by right wing economic journalists.

    Read here -
    How long until the patience of workers in Ireland runs out? | Joe Higgins.eu
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    Does that OECD Report take account of the fact that the countries listed (Norway, Sweden, France, Finland and Belgium) have fairly significant militaries, which we don't?

    Military budgets would also be rather large compared to other departments so should also skew figures.

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    Its time that the workers visited catastrophic consequences on the bankers and their lackey politicians that brought the country to this.

    What would it take to send a message to the bankers and their lickspittle politicos ?

    I think they are a bit stupid and it may take some lead injected at high velocity into their moronic heads before they see the enormity of their criminality.

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    Hell will freeze over before the workers of this country rise en masse against the current government.
    If you continue to elect idiots in elections, don't be surprised when the result is an idiotic government.

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    Politics.ie Member making waves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lobby View Post
    Does that OECD Report take account of the fact that the countries listed (Norway, Sweden, France, Finland and Belgium) have fairly significant militaries, which we don't?

    Military budgets would also be rather large compared to other departments so should also skew figures.
    Just one comparison to show how low public spending is in this country

    Education spending -

    Country % GDP
    Denmark (DK) 8.43
    Sweden (SE) 7.18
    Cyprus (CY) 6.70
    Finland (FI) 6.42
    Belgium (BE) 5.99
    Slovenia (SI) 5.85
    France (FR) 5.81
    Hungary (HU) 5.43
    Austria (AT) 5.44
    Estonia (EE) 4.98
    Poland (PL) 5.41
    Portugal (PT) 5.29
    UK 5.25
    Lithuania (LT) 5.20
    Latvia (LV) 5.07
    EU-27 5.07
    Netherlands (NL) 5.16
    Malta (MT) 4.85
    Ireland (IE) 4.72

    And in terms of the numbers completing third level (demonstrates the fact that the Irish education system is punching above its weight for the level of spending -

    Country %
    Czech Republic (CZ) 91.8
    Poland (PL) 91.7
    Slovakia (SK) 91.5
    Slovenia (SI) 89.4
    Lithuania (LT) 88.2
    Sweden (SE) 86.5
    Austria (AT) 85.8
    Ireland (IE) 85.7
    Finland (FI) 84.7
    France (FR) 83.2
    Cyprus (CY) 83.7
    Belgium (BE) 82.4
    Hungary (HU) 82.9
    Estonia (EE) 82
    Greece (EL) 81
    Latvia (LV) 81
    Bulgaria (BG) 80.5
    United Kingdom (UK) 78.8
    EU-27 77.9
    Denmark (DK) 77.4
    Romania (RO) 77.2
    Netherlands (NL) 74.7
    Italy (IT) 75.5
    Germany (DE) 77.4
    Luxembourg (LU) 69.3
    Spain (ES) 61.6
    Malta (MT) 50.4
    Portugal (PT) 49.6
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    Quote Originally Posted by making waves View Post
    Just one comparison to show how low public spending is in this country

    Education spending -

    Country % GDP
    Denmark (DK) 8.43
    Sweden (SE) 7.18
    Cyprus (CY) 6.70
    Finland (FI) 6.42
    Belgium (BE) 5.99
    Slovenia (SI) 5.85
    France (FR) 5.81
    Hungary (HU) 5.43
    Austria (AT) 5.44
    Estonia (EE) 4.98
    Poland (PL) 5.41
    Portugal (PT) 5.29
    UK 5.25
    Lithuania (LT) 5.20
    Latvia (LV) 5.07
    EU-27 5.07
    Netherlands (NL) 5.16
    Malta (MT) 4.85
    Ireland (IE) 4.72
    Although, to be fair, that's because a lot of these countries tax the 'workers.'

    As far as I know, in Denmark, Sweden etc. you start paying income tax on a very low income.

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    Default North Korea.

    I think that there is a better chance of North Korea overthrowing their leaders than the people of Ireland revolting against their so-called leaders...

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    Politics.ie Member seabhac siulach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by making waves View Post
    Just one comparison to show how low public spending is in this country

    Education spending -

    Country % GDP
    Denmark (DK) 8.43
    Sweden (SE) 7.18
    Cyprus (CY) 6.70
    Finland (FI) 6.42
    Belgium (BE) 5.99
    Slovenia (SI) 5.85
    France (FR) 5.81
    Hungary (HU) 5.43
    Austria (AT) 5.44
    Estonia (EE) 4.98
    Poland (PL) 5.41
    Portugal (PT) 5.29
    UK 5.25
    Lithuania (LT) 5.20
    Latvia (LV) 5.07
    EU-27 5.07
    Netherlands (NL) 5.16
    Malta (MT) 4.85
    Ireland (IE) 4.72

    And in terms of the numbers completing third level (demonstrates the fact that the Irish education system is punching above its weight for the level of spending -

    Country %
    Czech Republic (CZ) 91.8
    Poland (PL) 91.7
    Slovakia (SK) 91.5
    Slovenia (SI) 89.4
    Lithuania (LT) 88.2
    Sweden (SE) 86.5
    Austria (AT) 85.8
    Ireland (IE) 85.7
    Finland (FI) 84.7
    France (FR) 83.2
    Cyprus (CY) 83.7
    Belgium (BE) 82.4
    Hungary (HU) 82.9
    Estonia (EE) 82
    Greece (EL) 81
    Latvia (LV) 81
    Bulgaria (BG) 80.5
    United Kingdom (UK) 78.8
    EU-27 77.9
    Denmark (DK) 77.4
    Romania (RO) 77.2
    Netherlands (NL) 74.7
    Italy (IT) 75.5
    Germany (DE) 77.4
    Luxembourg (LU) 69.3
    Spain (ES) 61.6
    Malta (MT) 50.4
    Portugal (PT) 49.6
    I believe the difference in Ireland's GDP and GNP may be skewing those figures. Our GNP is a more accurate reflection of output, considering that GDP includes profits, etc. of multinationals; money that does not remain in Ireland. Taking GNP instead of GDP would move Ireland (slightly) up that leaderboard that you show. I would imagine it would show Ireland to have a more average EU spend on education...still not great, though. Your point is probably still valid, however.

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    Politics.ie Member Catalpa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beamish2010 View Post
    I think that there is a better chance of North Korea overthrowing their leaders than the people of Ireland revolting against their so-called leaders...
    Stop being silly.

    This State is a Democracy and its pretty obvious that this Government will be booted out at the next General Election.

    Hopefully within the next few months.

    The people of the er ...Democratic Republic of Korea will be given no such opportunity to remove their own set of clowns.

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    Politics.ie Member bormotello's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by making waves View Post
    by Joe Higgins, Socialist Party MEP

    The economic establishment wants to turn Irish workers into the “coolies” of Western Europe – low paid, working long hours and in general at the beck and call of their masters.

    This has also been the thrust of the propaganda campaign against public sector workers in certain media for a period of years. This propaganda suggests that the public sector is heavily overstaffed and that public sector workers are massively overpaid. The true facts are conveniently ignored.

    In 2008, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published a report on the Irish public sector which gives the lie to the propaganda claims. The Report states, “As compared with other OECD countries, 2005 data indicate that general employment in Ireland…is relatively low among OECD countries and is significantly less that the level of public employment in Norway, Sweden, France, Finland and Belgium.” Again the Report states, “Government policy therefore has actually decreased the total number of public sector employees as a percentage of the labour force and decreased the overall public sector wage bill as a percentage of GDP.” Again, “The public sector workforce, excluding commercial state sponsored bodies, is relatively low compared with other OECD countries, and significantly less that the level of public employment in Norway, Sweden, France, Finland and Belgium.” So much then for the “bloated public sector”, a phrase much loved by right wing economic journalists.

    Read here -
    How long until the patience of workers in Ireland runs out? | Joe Higgins.eu
    i.e only 5(since when Norway in EU?) countries from 27 have higher number of public servants then Ireland.

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