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Thread: UK 4th Most Admired Country

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    Politics.ie Member A view from England's Avatar
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    Default UK 4th Most Admired Country

    The 2010 Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands Index was compiled from the views of around 20,000 adults from around 20 countries.

    UK 'is fourth most admired country' - And Finally, Frontpage - Independent.ie

    Would it be possible for Ireland to benefit in some way from this? Could a joint UK/Ireland tourist scheme perhaps promote both countries in Europe and beyond to boost the economic prospects of both countries?

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    I assumed that going by your patriotic tunes that You were number 1 and that you ruled the world.
    “The curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design.” - Friedrich A. Hayek

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    Politics.ie Member Sync's Avatar
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    Not really. Aside from speaking the same language, there's not a lot of similarities. I don't think the UK even advertises itself, normally it's the individual branches i.e come to Scotland etc. Plus we target the UK with a lot of our tourism. You'd be making a seperate board to promote it, and really all it would do would be to confuse matters.
    "Come to London. Where you're just a quick flight, visa check, currency exchange and passport control to Dublin!" isn't a great tag line. Can't see any defined benefit for either party, and I can't see the UK promoting themselves as "The 4th most admired country" either.
    I'm living in America, and in America, you're on your own. America's not a country. It's just a business. Now f***ing pay me.

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    Politics.ie Member A view from England's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sync View Post
    Not really. Aside from speaking the same language, there's not a lot of similarities. I don't think the UK even advertises itself, normally it's the individual branches i.e come to Scotland etc. Plus we target the UK with a lot of our tourism. You'd be making a seperate board to promote it, and really all it would do would be to confuse matters.
    "Come to London. Where you're just a quick flight, visa check, currency exchange and passport control to Dublin!" isn't a great tag line. Can't see any defined benefit for either party, and I can't see the UK promoting themselves as "The 4th most admired country" either.
    Ah but you are forgetting Northern Ireland. Part of the UK last time I looked. Now I would have thought a joint effort to promote tourism would be beneficial. Perhaps Ireland likes it's tourism market as it is; failing.

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    Did I not see something recently on the BBC website stating that Britain was voted the worst place to live in Europe? We really need to maintain a separate Irish identity in tourism marketing terms anyway so I would be opposed to this suggestion.

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    The U.S. the most admired country?

    This must be a list with a difference.

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    Politics.ie Member Chrisco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sync View Post
    Not really. Aside from speaking the same language, there's not a lot of similarities.
    Viewed from the global perspective, that is, as the Spanish might not say, horseshít.

    On the contrary, most people in Latin America and Asia (I don't know much about Africa) struggle to work out in what way we are different from the British.

    We lose out big time by not having a commonly recognised tourist visa scheme with the UK, or even better with Schengen.

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    Politics.ie Member Arracht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A view from England View Post
    Ah but you are forgetting Northern Ireland. Part of the UK last time I looked. Now I would have thought a joint effort to promote tourism would be beneficial. Perhaps Ireland likes it's tourism market as it is; failing.
    As far as I know there is a joint tourism strategy between Bord Fáilte and the NI Tourism Board.

    Here we are:

    Tourism Ireland | Corporate Website | - Home!

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    Politics.ie Member Sync's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A view from England View Post
    Ah but you are forgetting Northern Ireland. Part of the UK last time I looked. Now I would have thought a joint effort to promote tourism would be beneficial. Perhaps Ireland likes it's tourism market as it is; failing.
    NI promotes itself seperately as well. For many of the same reasons: Different currency, different exchequer, slightly different target market. NI focus on people in the Republic and vice versa. The North did a great job of getting the DiscoverIreland domain. Why split some of the people from that to the South?

    The republic draws in far more US visitors based around it's history. Why would we drain some of those people off to the North? There's no reason for it. The ROI and North already have DiscoverIreland websites advertising "Come to Ireland" How would you show that this is now a united effort? "Come to a united IReland?" Don't see that going down well. It's about as integrated as it's going to get.

    Simply because you can do something doesn't mean you should. There's no economies of scale here to further integration.
    I'm living in America, and in America, you're on your own. America's not a country. It's just a business. Now f***ing pay me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisco View Post
    On the contrary, most people in Latin America and Asia (I don't know much about Africa) struggle to work out in what way we are different from the British.
    What is this "most people"? Have you got polls or some other means to back that assertion up?

    Given the history of Irish immigration to Argentina, I'd bet most know that Ireland and the U.K. are different places. Given people like Bernardo O'Higgins, I'd say Chileans would be in a similar position.

    Or is that just your personal impression talking?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisco View Post
    We lose out big time by not having a commonly recognised tourist visa scheme with the UK, or even better with Schengen.
    The vast majority of tourists who come to Ireland have no need of visas. Of those who do, I don't expect a deluge of Cuban or Iraqi tourists to our shores any time soon.

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