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Thread: Dermot Ahern and White Collar Crime

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    Politics.ie Member Malbekh's Avatar
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    Default Dermot Ahern and White Collar Crime

    It occurs to me that we are heading to the inevitable conclusion that very few, if any, of the bankers and developers - let alone our politicians - will pay a suitable price for destroying a perfectly good economy.

    By paying a price of course, I mean in terms of jail sentences, financial ruin or exclusion from politics or a permanent ban on directorships of companies.

    The main reason for this is our limited and pathetic laws on white collar crime. One would have thought in the interests of the State, that the current Justice Minister would have spent a good deal of his time drafting new legislation dealing with this inadequacy.

    I've scoured around and all I seem to pick up on is new blasphemy laws and various draconian measures to deal with gangland crime. Am I missing something here? Is this a classic case of plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose?
    Blessed be the threadmakers.

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    Another reason they'll all walk, especially politicians, is the outdated laws on treason. Given the number of FF politicians that have destroyed the country by pursuing policies to benefit and enrich a mere handful of people, the treason laws should be changed to cover patronage and economic manipulation to benefit a chosen few.
    Negative equity, unemployment, emigration, IMF, bankruptcy: brought to you by Fianna Fail - destroying millions of lives for 80 years.

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    The last time the Irish economy was anywhere near "perfectly good" was around 1997-8...it's been a sham ever since.

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    Default Take your pick, you have all the time in the world

    In general -
    http://www.politics.ie/justice/45664...-fail-did.html

    In particular -
    http://www.politics.ie/justice/13626...me-reform.html


    Incredible -
    The ODCE's Kevin Prendergast said that there was an expectations gap between what people expected of the ODCE and what it could actually do.
    http://www.politics.ie/justice/13308...-too-much.html

    Innocent -
    http://www.politics.ie/economy/46979...ived-here.html
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malbekh View Post
    ... One would have thought in the interests of the State, that the current Justice Minister would have spent a good deal of his time drafting new legislation dealing with this inadequacy.
    What do they say about the man who never made a mistake?

    http://www.politics.ie/justice/13148...e-mistake.html
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair.

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    Dial to stop Dodgy Dealings.

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    Default White collar grime?

    He likes his white collars. Never a sign of grime either. Does that count? Could this all be a matter of mixing up a g for a c?
    Last edited by He3; 13th October 2010 at 06:34 PM.
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malbekh View Post
    It occurs to me that we are heading to the inevitable conclusion that very few, if any, of the bankers and developers - let alone our politicians - will pay a suitable price for destroying a perfectly good economy.

    By paying a price of course, I mean in terms of jail sentences, financial ruin or exclusion from politics or a permanent ban on directorships of companies.

    The main reason for this is our limited and pathetic laws on white collar crime. One would have thought in the interests of the State, that the current Justice Minister would have spent a good deal of his time drafting new legislation dealing with this inadequacy.

    I've scoured around and all I seem to pick up on is new blasphemy laws and various draconian measures to deal with gangland crime. Am I missing something here? Is this a classic case of plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose?
    Of course they will all get away with it,nobody will go to jail because the establishment never get prosecuted for anything.

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    Politics.ie Member Malbekh's Avatar
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    In light of current developments with Mr Drumm, seems only fair to point out the obvious correlation. I have a feeling I will be returning to this thread on a regular basis over the next year or so...
    Blessed be the threadmakers.

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    Politics.ie Member SlabMurphy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malbekh View Post
    It occurs to me that we are heading to the inevitable conclusion that very few, if any, of the bankers and developers - let alone our politicians - will pay a suitable price for destroying a perfectly good economy.

    By paying a price of course, I mean in terms of jail sentences, financial ruin or exclusion from politics or a permanent ban on directorships of companies.

    The main reason for this is our limited and pathetic laws on white collar crime. One would have thought in the interests of the State, that the current Justice Minister would have spent a good deal of his time drafting new legislation dealing with this inadequacy.

    I've scoured around and all I seem to pick up on is new blasphemy laws and various draconian measures to deal with gangland crime. Am I missing something here? Is this a classic case of plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose?
    Good thread, have been thinking about this myself. Contrast how John Gilligan and co. were - rightly - protrayed in the media and tougher crime laws and punishment as well as CAB etc Two years after the country has gone into the most horrendous spiral due to cronyism, corruption and incompetence - and the great FF haven't brought in a single change to see that it doesn't happen again. Says it all about the future of this rotten, pathetic state. And FG wouldn't do anything either.

    And even if Labour or whoever got proper laws passed, FF would be in again sometime and like stealth taxes, chip away at the tough corporate laws until they became worthless like they did with the Ethics in Public and Freedom of Information acts. That's why I say we need some sort of constitutional reform to copper fasten governance and corporate regulation and punishment so that in future FF or FG for that matter don't allow the flood gates to open for corruption, cronyism and incompetence.

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