The much reported Kyrgyzstan election has taken place. The results show no clear winner, but an Ultra-nationalist party has taken a narrow lead over its two main rivals:

France24 - Nationalists stage upset in Kyrgyzstan vote

This election makes Kyrgyzstan the first parlimentry democracy in Asia apparently. Given the results it seems a wise move by the incumbant government, whose desire to introduce parlimentry democracy will see several dispirit parties having to work together to form a coalition government.

This should be an interesting time for Kyrgyzstan, the CIS and Asia as a whole, as Kyrgyzstan, racked by violence recently, has to negotiate internal compromise. If proper safe guards are put in place the new Kyrgyz parlimentry system could foster a stabilty that thus far is only possible through virtual one party rule in Asia, the majority of whose democracies have a President with overwhelming executive power. It is a major step forward in political growth and maturity for any ex-Communist power.

Parlimentry Democracy is old hat to us, but to see how it fairs in Kyrgyzstan will be very interesting. This election is illustrative of how democracy itself can be amended, tailored and broadened in order to increase stability. In Kyrgyzstan that is exactly what has been done.

I believe that the disadvantages of Parlimentry led democracy can be overcome by the very mechanisms that make it possible. Reliance on the military is lessened, certinaly less than to the degree it is needed in the virtical power model fostered throughout much of Asia. Compromise is the key and in the case of Kyrgyzstan seems the only solution possible to solve its protected and deep rooted problems.

When other regional autocrats fall like the former Kyrgyz leader Bakiyev did, Kyrgyzstan may provide a blueprint of how to form national consensus and deny the reassent of dictators to power through 'winner takes all' democractic methods. Kyrgyzstan must first however makes its new democratic model work.

Current interim President Roza Otunbayeva should recieve recognition internationally for her brave expermiment in bringing both democracy and the prospect of tolerance and compromise to an emerging Asian and CIS decmocracy. The Irish government and indeed the EU should make public overtures of support for the new system in Kyrgyzstan to illustrate to doubters that the system and those who end up administering it, will have friends internationally. They have joined a very elite club.