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Thread: Protestant/Unionist migration to NI

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    Default Protestant/Unionist migration to NI

    Hello.

    Looking for referral to a source on numbers of Protestants and/or Unionists who lived south of the border, and migrated north of the border, from 1922 onwards. Also commentary on localised reasons for the migration.

    Web or otherwise. Thanks in advance.
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    Some info from this extract: JSTOR: An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie

    Also, RTE did a documentary covering the emigration from Cork - CSI: Cork's Bloody Secret - if you can get your hands on that.

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    I'm glad to see you distinguish "protestants" and "unionists": the two terms are (in terms of post-1921 "southern" Ireland and what I see of your defined subject-area) pretty well mutually-exclusive.

    So, is your essential point those who migrated "north"? Or is it a comparison of attitudes between those who emigrated (in the main, not to NI) and those who stayed?

    If you want a general approach, I think I'd start with RB McDowell's Crisis and Decline: The Fate of the Southern Unionists [1997].

    That was in part a (unionist) rebuttal of:
    Bowen, Kurt: Protestants in a Catholic State: Ireland's Privileged Minority [1983].

    For something more anecdotal (but well written), the late Mark Bence-Jones did Twilight of the Ascendancy [1993], mainly concerned with the cream of Anglo-Irish society (i.e. the rich and the thick). Unless you can find a second-hand copy, or a well-stocked library, the price should put you off.

    FSL Lyons did a couple of earlier studies:
    • The Minority Problem in the 26 Counties in The Years of the Great Test, 1926–36, ed: Francis MacManus [1967],
    • Culture and Anarchy in Ireland, 1890–1939 [1979],


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    Politics.ie Member White Horse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joopface View Post
    Hello.

    Looking for referral to a source on numbers of Protestants and/or Unionists who lived south of the border, and migrated north of the border, from 1922 onwards. Also commentary on localised reasons for the migration.

    Web or otherwise. Thanks in advance.
    There wasn't major movement north. I live in a border county and if anything, there was more movement of protestants into the the Irish Republic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by White Horse View Post
    There wasn't major movement north. I live in a border county and if anything, there was more movement of protestants into the the Irish Republic.
    It could be considered weird....But the amount of northern Protestants who have over the years moved south is pretty huge. Understandable aswell given the fact that the south maybe bonkers but its not crazy.

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    Ireland,north and south belong in the UK.We speak the same language,have the same values,we belong together.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcdonald douglas View Post
    Ireland,north and south belong in the UK.We speak the same language,have the same values,we belong together.
    How do you come to that conclusion...We only speak the same language because we were forced to speak it....And they also speak English in Canada, Australia and the USA so why not join one of them them as per your logic........

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    Politics.ie Member Portadown madman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by White Horse View Post
    There wasn't major movement north.
    Have you a valid link that's states this?

    I was born in the south, my family have been in Ireland since the mid 1500's
    Our only crime was that we was protestant.

    After the south got it's independence from Britain,Protestants were treated like sh!te. being referred to as ''them'' and ''that protestant family''

    My parents moved us to the North, yet my grandparents stayed because it was home. I wonder why many in my family have a bitter dislike of the south.
    Last edited by Portadown madman; 10th October 2010 at 08:05 PM.

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    Politics.ie Member Portadown madman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogtrotter View Post
    How do you come to that conclusion...We only speak the same language because we were forced to speak it.....
    Wise up, will ye.

    English was the native tongue to many in the south.

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    Politics.ie Member diy01's Avatar
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    Only going back two or three generations, in most cases. (referring to the time of partition)

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