Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 50

Thread: Was Richard Bruton used as a 'stalking horse'?

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    195
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Was Richard Bruton used as a 'stalking horse'?

    This is the method much loved by the English Tories when they want to depose a leader. Not so common in Irish politics. But the question does arise in relation the the recent farcical attempted coup in FG: was Bruton (unkown to himself) used by certain wilier Blueshirts with leadership ambitions of their own as a stalking horse? It's quite clear that Bruton's long-term leadership ambitions have been damaged (probably irreparably) by this fiasco: will the real contender emerge in the coming months?

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member LeDroit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1,771
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    'Wilier Blueshirts'! LOL!

    There's no one in FG worthy of leadership. Look at them. Kenny became leader for God's sake, that should be enough evidence.
    "A govt big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have" Thomas Jefferson

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    195
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LeDroit View Post
    'Wilier Blueshirts'! LOL!

    There's no one in FG worthy of leadership. Look at them. Kenny became leader for God's sake, that should be enough evidence.
    It strikes me that at least two of the so-called young bloods (Coveney and Varadkar) may have leadership potential. Interestingly, they both openly admit to leadership ambitions. More interestingly, they both played central roles in the abortive coup.

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    12,223
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    And the winner of the silliest thread of the day is . . .
    "In [Ireland] a wife is regarded as a chattel, just as a thoroughbred mare or cow." Mr Justice Butler in the Irish courts. 'Traditional Marriage' in the 1970s.

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    46,555
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Wept View Post
    This is the method much loved by the English Tories when they want to depose a leader. Not so common in Irish politics. But the question does arise in relation the the recent farcical attempted coup in FG: was Bruton (unkown to himself) used by certain wilier Blueshirts with leadership ambitions of their own as a stalking horse? It's quite clear that Bruton's long-term leadership ambitions have been damaged (probably irreparably) by this fiasco: will the real contender emerge in the coming months?
    I presume you selected your username after reading that post.
    "So how are things at the Campaign for the Freedom of Information, by the way?" "Sorry, I can't talk about that"

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member RahenyFG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wernham and Hogg Ltd, Slough
    Posts
    9,201
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I reckon Leo Varadkar would make a good FG leader. He's a good debater on tv and addresses issues quite well. Plus I think he fits the bill, young, healthy, informative and straight talking, that is needed in this day and age of personality politics.

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member farnaby's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Swords
    Posts
    1,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Wept View Post
    It strikes me that at least two of the so-called young bloods (Coveney and Varadkar) may have leadership potential. Interestingly, they both openly admit to leadership ambitions. More interestingly, they both played central roles in the abortive coup.
    At the time RB was the 'most-capable-in-the-Dail' in public perception - the coup plotters thought it was a fait accompli once it was initiated. And those mentioned probably thought they had the more prestigious ministerial seats sewn up after supporting him. Your thesis isn't plausible.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    195
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hiding behind a poster View Post
    I presume you selected your username after reading that post.
    Does a coup as botched as that, clearly ill-fated from the start, not cause you to raise even one eyebrow in a tiny fraction of suspicion? And you don't think there are any scheming Machiavellian type characters in the ranks of the Blueshirts, that they're all pure as the driven snow, motivated solely by the loftiest ideals?

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member Twin Towers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,874
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RahenyFG View Post
    I reckon Leo Varadkar would make a good FG leader.
    Varadkar is the obvious choice although I reckon he's sick of politics.

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    10,242
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus Wept View Post
    This is the method much loved by the English Tories when they want to depose a leader. Not so common in Irish politics. But the question does arise in relation the the recent farcical attempted coup in FG: was Bruton (unkown to himself) used by certain wilier Blueshirts with leadership ambitions of their own as a stalking horse? It's quite clear that Bruton's long-term leadership ambitions have been damaged (probably irreparably) by this fiasco: will the real contender emerge in the coming months?
    Straight answer, no. He was full on going for it.

    At the FG Ard Fheis Kenny made much of Bruton as his man for finance in a future government. The following day he was forced to back off from that and effectively conceded the job to Lab. It was an incredibly stupid thing to do and I predicted at the time it would lead to Bruton challenging him. He waited for a plausible hook to hang the challenge on and went for it.

    The heave was triggered by idiocy not wiliness.
    Last edited by Baron von Biffo; 1st October 2010 at 01:02 AM. Reason: Typo

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •