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Thread: Euro note question?

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    Politics.ie Member Twin Towers's Avatar
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    Default Euro note question?

    Why if the euro is a common currency are each countries notes identifiable by the serial number?

    Was this to prevent a currency chaos in the event of a member state being ordered to stop issuing and that countries money could then be easily avoided?

    We have already had rumours of German (X) shopkeepers refusing to accept Greek (Y) notes. Looking through my wallet the spanking new €50's are all Italian (S)

    The 11 digit serial number on every note begins with a prefix showing which country issued it. German notes begin with an X, Greek notes start with a Y, Spain's have a V, France a U, Ireland T, Portugal M and Italy S. Belgium is Z, Cyprus G, Luxembourg I, Malta F, Netherlands P, Austria N, Slovenia H, Slovakia E and Finland L.

    You can double check the issuer by adding the digits and adding again to arrive at a country code, eg: X50446027856.....(5+0+4+4+6+0+2+7+8+5+6) = 47, (4+7) = 11, (1+1) gives 2, the code number for Germany.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Twin Towers View Post

    We have already had rumours of German (X) shopkeepers refusing to accept Greek (Y) notes.
    I've not heard those rumours. Were they mentioned on P.ie. or elsewhere? Any links?
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    Politics.ie Member ballot stuffer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yehbut_nobut View Post
    I've not heard those rumours. Were they mentioned on P.ie. or elsewhere? Any links?
    These rumours did the rounds at the same time as Lehmans and again during the Greek tragedy. I couldn't find a source more concrete than Ambrose Evans Pritchard in the Telegraph. Make of that what you will.
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    Politics.ie Member Sync's Avatar
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    Do you have to constantly be a lunatic? Is it never tiring for you? You have to give them serial numbers. The serial numbers have to mean something. Doesn't breaking it down by Country-Mint-issue number make the most sense? How else would you organise the numbering system?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twin Towers View Post
    You can double check the issuer by adding the digits and adding again to arrive at a country code, eg: X50446027856.....(5+0+4+4+6+0+2+7+8+5+6) = 47, (4+7) = 11, (1+1) gives 2, the code number for Germany.
    But there are sixteen countries in the eurozone?

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    Because they're printed by the individual countries. Assigning a country prefix means that countries don't have to cross-check their serial numbers.

    Same system for telephones, domain names, etc etc...but perhaps the fact that we have a unique country code for Irish telephone numbers means that there's a secret plan to cut our telephones off from the rest of the world, eh?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riadach View Post
    But there are sixteen countries in the eurozone?
    The "X" is all that's required to identify it as Germany. Irish banknotes start with a "T".
    Never let the best be the enemy of the good.

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    Politics.ie Member Twin Towers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riadach View Post
    But there are sixteen countries in the eurozone?
    I believe some countries share a code.

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    Politics.ie Member kerdasi amaq's Avatar
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    Some letters have already been allotted to countries that haven't joined the Eurozone.

    W is Denmark. R is Luxembourg. K is Sweden and J is the United Kingdom. I,Q, and O are not in use.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twin Towers View Post
    Why if the euro is a common currency are each countries notes identifiable by the serial number?

    Was this to prevent a currency chaos in the event of a member state being ordered to stop issuing and that countries money could then be easily avoided?

    We have already had rumours of German (X) shopkeepers refusing to accept Greek (Y) notes. Looking through my wallet the spanking new €50's are all Italian (S)

    The 11 digit serial number on every note begins with a prefix showing which country issued it. German notes begin with an X, Greek notes start with a Y, Spain's have a V, France a U, Ireland T, Portugal M and Italy S. Belgium is Z, Cyprus G, Luxembourg I, Malta F, Netherlands P, Austria N, Slovenia H, Slovakia E and Finland L.

    You can double check the issuer by adding the digits and adding again to arrive at a country code, eg: X50446027856.....(5+0+4+4+6+0+2+7+8+5+6) = 47, (4+7) = 11, (1+1) gives 2, the code number for Germany.

    Nothing strange here. The U.S. uses a similar system. Each of the issuing Federal Reserve banks has an identifying letter which is printed on the currency they issue. The note in the link below was issued by the Federal reserve bank of San Francisco, as can be seen from the letter "L" in the crest on the left.





    http://wendyusuallywanders.files.wor..._us_dollar.jpg

    P.S. Most Americans in my experience are oblivious of this system.

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