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Thread: Green Party achievements in government

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    Default Green Party achievements in government

    Some fairly dubious "achievements" here. Most achievements are future commitments which are completely worthless

    31 Aug 09: EU introduces phased ban on incandescent bulbs
    Good on the EU

    15 December 08: Broadband use increases by 6.7%: Communications Minister Eamon Ryan releases figures showing 1,125,080 people in Ireland are signed up to broadband.
    People want broadband. Get broadband. Greens take the credit?


    31 May 09: 10,000 green jobs created in 2009: Minister Ryan reveals that 50% of new jobs created this year are in the green economy
    Where is the proof?

    5 Feb 09: Government launches ‘Smarter Travel - A Sustainable Transport Future’ which commits to getting 500,000 commuters out of their cars and 150,000 extra workers cycling every day. The plan will slash CO2 emissions by 4 million tones.
    If a plan can slash CO2 emissions, why do we not have more plans

    28 Jan 09: European Commission awards €100m to fund an electricity interconnector between Ireland and the UK to secure energy supply
    Go on the Commission

    1 Jan 09: Green Party launches campaign to promote the Cycle to Work scheme introduced in Budget 2009. Workers will receive up to €1,000 tax break to buy a bicycle and accessories
    Eamon Ryan digs out the bicycle shop industry.

    Rolling list of achievements - John Gormley

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    I agree that the list covers some things which aren't reasonably regarded as achievements, or are too minor to be worth a mention, but the ones you cite below are too quickly dismissed with little thought of what went into them, and how they come to be.

    31 Aug 09: EU introduces phased ban on incandescent bulbs
    Good on the EU
    I don't know the timeline of how this happened, but individual countries taking action helps spur international action. In nuclear weapons treaties, for example (something of much more importance, of course), nothing really happens unless some country shows movement with international compulsion. EU regulations on inefficient bulbs were always likely, but examples of countries bringing them in in their own right only speeds and strengthens the case for them.

    15 December 08: Broadband use increases by 6.7%: Communications Minister Eamon Ryan releases figures showing 1,125,080 people in Ireland are signed up to broadband.
    People want broadband. Get broadband. Greens take the credit?
    Partial credit, yes. Poor broadband rollout and speeds are almost always blamed on government inaction. (Or, given that the sale of Eircom is one of the primary reasons for our poor broadband: government action.) It seems completely logical to me that if a government is seen as having an input into the problems with broadband in Ireland, that they can also be seen to be having an input and role in the solutions. Yes, people want broadband, but they want plenty of other utilities too. Even when privately controlled, government initiative can be required to have those utilities delivered quickly, efficiently and properly. Seems a pretty reasonable thing to claim some credit for.

    31 May 09: 10,000 green jobs created in 2009: Minister Ryan reveals that 50% of new jobs created this year are in the green economy
    Where is the proof?
    Here, here, and here.

    5 Feb 09: Government launches ‘Smarter Travel - A Sustainable Transport Future’ which commits to getting 500,000 commuters out of their cars and 150,000 extra workers cycling every day. The plan will slash CO2 emissions by 4 million tones.
    If a plan can slash CO2 emissions, why do we not have more plans
    It's difficult to tell what point you're making here. Is it that plans don't achieve anything in themselves? If so, that's entirely correct, but that's different to suggesting that plans are not required. If a fairly basic idea that if you want to achieve an aim, you should have a strategy for how to implement it.

    Also, it's not simply a plan. It involves legislative and procedural change, and has a fund associated with it, which is already being spent. You can read more on that fund here.

    28 Jan 09: European Commission awards €100m to fund an electricity interconnector between Ireland and the UK to secure energy supply
    Go on the Commission
    Again, it's a bit childish and simplistic to assume that the Commission decided to partially fund this interconnector without lobbying, argument and work on the part of the relevant Minister, who just so happens to be Eamon Ryan.

    1 Jan 09: Green Party launches campaign to promote the Cycle to Work scheme introduced in Budget 2009. Workers will receive up to €1,000 tax break to buy a bicycle and accessories
    Eamon Ryan digs out the bicycle shop industry.
    Green Party introduces tax breaks which simultaneously support small businesses while getting more people cycling. Take up of scheme is huge, and increasing rapidly. Lots of bike shops saying that they'd shut down if it wasn't for it. Cyclesuperstore in Tallaght have taken on extra people as a direct result, and a survey of bike shops showed that over 40% of their sales are now coming through the scheme. Don't really get what your problem is with that.

    There are some things on that list which probably shouldn't be, such as the Dublin Mayor, which for obvious reasons can't be notched up as a Green achievement just yet, but the examples you've chosen are pretty good ones, and I think your responses to them are fairly lazy and limp.

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    Great links there mate. You should look up CBBCS for more inspiration.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post

    Again, it's a bit childish and simplistic to assume that the Commission decided to partially fund this interconnector without lobbying, argument and work on the part of the relevant Minister, who just so happens to be Eamon Ryan.
    Is the electricity that's going to be provided non-nuclear generated?
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    Feathering there own nest .They even beat fianna scum on that commitment .
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    Passed this way an hour ago,With his friend, a jealous monk

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    v
    EU regulations on inefficient bulbs were always likely, but examples of countries bringing them in in their own right only speeds and strengthens the case for them. [/quote]

    What you mean is that the Greens talked about implementing the changes, they didn't like the response they were getting, looked scared and took the opportunity to blame it on the EU. Then once the EU took the flack they want to take the credit.... (indeed on another thread here some supporters were very fast to blame the EU)

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    Partial credit, yes. Poor broadband rollout and speeds are almost always blamed on government inaction. (Or, given that the sale of Eircom is one of the primary reasons for our poor broadband: government action.) It seems completely logical to me that if a government is seen as having an input into the problems with broadband in Ireland, that they can also be seen to be having an input and role in the solutions. Yes, people want broadband, but they want plenty of other utilities too. Even when privately controlled, government initiative can be required to have those utilities delivered quickly, efficiently and properly. Seems a pretty reasonable thing to claim some credit for.
    I would give him credit for managing to get 3G mobile data classed as broadband while every other country in the OECD laughs at the idea. How Ryan achieved that I will never know but fair play to him.

    I would however like to see the figures with mobile data removed so we can make a like for like comparison with other OECD countries.


    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    Here, here, and here.
    So according t you only 10,000 jobs were created last year ? If they didn't have a big announcement they didn't happen ? If noting else it finally proves that the government and the Greens know SFA about small indigenous business.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    It's difficult to tell what point you're making here. Is it that plans don't achieve anything in themselves? If so, that's entirely correct, but that's different to suggesting that plans are not required. If a fairly basic idea that if you want to achieve an aim, you should have a strategy for how to implement it.

    Also, it's not simply a plan. It involves legislative and procedural change, and has a fund associated with it, which is already being spent. You can read more on that fund here.
    What he is saying is that greens are very good at making plans, not quite so good at implementing them. Great at putting through random legislation and patting themselves on the back but poor at looking at the long term effects.

    Building regulations but no inspections worth talking about.
    BER certs where 5 testers will give 5 different results.
    Promote wind power without looking at the impact on energy security or costs. (and then ignore the fact that new extremely inefficient OCGT gas power stations have to be built to back them up. Ignore the cost the impact of this wind power has on our electricity costs.


    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    Again, it's a bit childish and simplistic to assume that the Commission decided to partially fund this interconnector without lobbying, argument and work on the part of the relevant Minister, who just so happens to be Eamon Ryan.
    So instead of using OCGT plants in Ireland we can import nuclear power ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    Green Party introduces tax breaks which simultaneously support small businesses while getting more people cycling. Take up of scheme is huge, and increasing rapidly. Lots of bike shops saying that they'd shut down if it wasn't for it. Cyclesuperstore in Tallaght have taken on extra people as a direct result, and a survey of bike shops showed that over 40% of their sales are now coming through the scheme. Don't really get what your problem is with that.
    Its a joke, with random inflated claims and no way of verifying their effectiveness.

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    Does voting confidence in a perjurer count as an achievement?
    “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty, than those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson (yeah, I'm aware of the irony)

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    Quote Originally Posted by DCon View Post
    If a plan can slash CO2 emissions, why do we not have more plans
    If the Greens were serious about carbon emissions, they'd introduce a carbon tax, change the motor tax system to be based on emissions, introduce new building regulations, ban inefficient light bulbs, and increase the energy PSO in order to allow the ESB and BNM invest in renewable energy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkey321 View Post
    What you mean is that the Greens talked about implementing the changes, they didn't like the response they were getting, looked scared and took the opportunity to blame it on the EU. Then once the EU took the flack they want to take the credit.... (indeed on another thread here some supporters were very fast to blame the EU)
    Actually in this case the EU specifically said that they were accelerating their plans in response to the Irish proposal.
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    What about the Planning Act? That really was an achievement and we will be glad of it whenever the economy recovers and the gombeenmen come back out of the woodwork...
    We need to radically change every system that has enabled the wholesale destruction of the Irish landscape, rural and urban. There is no time for incremental step by step measures. The systems have failed utterly and the only hope for a real recovery requires the rule book to be torn up completely.

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