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Thread: Another lot doing a "Pamela" disappearing act

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    Default Another lot doing a "Pamela" disappearing act

    Report from today's Examiner on yet another Nigerian family conveniently
    doing a disappearing act after asylum claim rejected.

    School prefect and family on run over deportation order | Irish Examiner

    Apart from the bleeding heart liberal reporting, quoting at length from their supporters ( and nothing from the court decision ) which I suppose is to be expected, what is interesting are the figures at the end of the report showing the largescale failure by the Authorities to enforce deportation orders. Makes a mockery really of the whole system, really.

    Are there any figures on the numbers of these illegal overstayers who are still in the country with their children?

    The people who are hiding these people are themselves committing criminal activity and should be prosecuted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Pat View Post
    Report from today's Examiner on yet another Nigerian family conveniently
    doing a disappearing act after asylum claim rejected.

    School prefect and family on run over deportation order | Irish Examiner

    Apart from the bleeding heart liberal reporting, quoting at length from their supporters ( and nothing from the court decision ) which I suppose is to be expected, what is interesting are the figures at the end of the report showing the largescale failure by the Authorities to enforce deportation orders. Makes a mockery really of the whole system, really.

    Are there any figures on the numbers of these illegal overstayers who are still in the country with their children?

    The people who are hiding these people are themselves committing criminal activity and should be prosecuted.
    It's the governments fault for being pathetic though, not the families. can't really make a mockery of a system which is as flawed as it is.

    I have watched a few episodes of the UK/New Zealand/Australian border control shows to see how they operate with illegals.

    Mercilessly is the answer.

    We are a soft touch for sure, but they might as well let the kid do his leaving cert.

    Are there any figures on the numbers of these illegal overstayers who are still in the country with their children?
    You can work it out from the last paragraph in the article.

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    Irish people tend to be weak and pathetic, hence the bleeding heart brigade. They should be financially punished.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xiogenes View Post
    It's the governments fault for being pathetic though, not the families. can't really make a mockery of a system which is as flawed as it is.

    I have watched a few episodes of the UK/New Zealand/Australian border control shows to see how they operate with illegals.

    Mercilessly is the answer.

    We are a soft touch for sure, but they might as well let the kid do his leaving cert.



    You can work it out from the last paragraph in the article.
    Not sure that one can. However, if they have their families with them, it makes for a very large number of undocumented illegal immigrants residing in the State. How do they support themselves - presumably they cannot work and from whom do they receive financial support?

    There is clearly a large support network here which should be tackled comprehensively. Anyone found to be hiding or supporting them should face the full rigour of the law - although in the Republic that seems not to be very much, anyhow, given the pathetic enforcement and general reluctance created by a climate of political correctness among our political classes and generally mindless "meejia".

    Agree with you that the Government have made a complete shambles of the whole thing - a bad joke really. Still these are migrants abusing the system and they should not be exonerated at the expense of genuine asylum seekers.
    Last edited by Dr Pat; 31st July 2010 at 01:31 PM. Reason: typo

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    Don't most of these folk end up here from other european countries? If so why can't they be deported back there, there first port of call so to speak?
    ''The tattoo has a profound meaning: the superficiality of modern man’s existence.'' - Theodore Dalrymple

    "Any fool can make something complicated. It takes a genius to make it simple." - Woody Guthrie

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    The proportion of deportations actually carried out appears small. Why is this? Is it legal challenge, disappearance, or lack of determination on the part of the authorities?

    I am very surprised to see that many deportation orders are made, but few are executed.

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    and lets not forget that the 'alternative government' have widely opposing views on the solution to the problem.......

    i wonder what the ff/labour government will do......


    or indeed, as suggested by a previous minister,,,set up a table at the airport, listen to the 'cock and bull'and send them back on the next plane.....

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    The fact that they receive accommodation rented from private landlords by the government might have something to do with it, no immigrants, no rent.

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    The number of Nigerians deported following failed asylum applications outnumbers all other nationalities.

    In 2009 Justice Minister Dermot Ahern signed 939 deportation orders, of which 236 were carried out. Figures for the five years between 2003 and 2008 show 2,431 of 8,960 deportation orders were acted on.

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    We’re asking for Bola to be allowed stay and finish his Leaving Cert, and if possible allow the family to be reunited back in Ireland.
    I wonder if those making this request have also volunteered to shoulder the cost of accomodating this family and paying for the education of the children for the ten and a half months between now and the end of the Leaving Cert exams.

    He said the decision was very disappointing because the family had made their life in Ireland and the children had spent a huge portion of their childhood here.
    I'd be sympathetic if the family had stayed in Ireland for six years awaiting their first decision but if they were refused asylum and chose to take appeals, they knew that, if those appeals were unsuccessful, they would still be subject to deportation once they'd exhausted appeals.

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