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Thread: Labour policy re work permits for Asylum Seekers?

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    Politics.ie Member Kevin Parlon's Avatar
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    Default Labour policy re work permits for Asylum Seekers?

    Hello,

    I noted this comment in the IT today . Rabbitte has said that Labour position was that "the correct thing to do was to enable quicker decisions to be taken on people’s asylum cases and change the situation with regard to the right to work for asylum seekers"

    Is it Labour policy to change the law to grant the right to work to asylum seekers? I didn't realise this was the case and would appreciate input from any party apparatchiks here on the site.

    I did a quick look on labour.ie but was turning up year 2000 policy docs etc.

    Many thanks.
    "It is amazing how many people think that they can answer an argument by attributing bad motives to those who disagree with them." - Thomas Sowell

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    Politics.ie Member bormotello's Avatar
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    Policy
    The entitlement of asylum seekers to their human rights

    Conference notes:
    That applying for refugee status in Ireland is a lengthy process, which can fail to recognise the particular circumstances of the person seeking asylum and overall lacks transparency and fairness.

    Conference further notes:
    That asylum seekers are living in very poor conditions and that barriers exist in relation to asylum seekers participating in Irish society.

    Conference therefore calls for:
    1. (a) The Office of the Refugee Application Commissioner to be replaced by an independent human rights body to ensure that individuals are assessed on the grounds of international human rights laws which have been ratified by the Irish government.
    (b) Extra resources to be put in place to ensure that cases are examined in a shorter time frame.
    (c) Asylum seekers to be entitled to proficient translators during interviews.

    2. (a) Asylum seekers to be given the opportunity to participate in paid employment.
    (b) Payment of €19.10 a week to be increased to a more realistic sum to ensure a sufficient standard of living.
    (c) The living conditions of asylum seekers, particularly in relation to overcrowding in accommodation and the poor quality of food, to be improved.
    (d) Greater provision of activities for asylum seekers.
    (e) Research to be carried out into child poverty among asylum seekers and for the State to ensure asylum seeking children have the same rights and entitlements as Irish children.
    (f) The State to increase its funding to SPIRASI, a voluntary organisation that works with asylum seekers who have survived torture.



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    Politics.ie Member Kevin Parlon's Avatar
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    That's pretty clear (if pretty shortsighted IMO) Thanks for responding.
    "It is amazing how many people think that they can answer an argument by attributing bad motives to those who disagree with them." - Thomas Sowell

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    I would presume (perhaps wrongly) that their intention would be to bring Ireland into line with the provisions of the EU directive laying down minimum standards for the reception of asylum seekers (2003/9/EC).

    In it, the section on employment states:

    Article 11

    Employment

    1. Member States shall determine a period of time, starting from the date on which an application for asylum was lodged, during which an applicant shall not have access to the labour market.

    2. If a decision at first instance has not been taken within one year of the presentation of an application for asylum and this delay cannot be attributed to the applicant, Member States shall decide the conditions for granting access to the labour market for the applicant.

    3. Access to the labour market shall not be withdrawn during appeals procedures, where an appeal against a negative decision in a regular procedure has suspensive effect, until such time as a negative decision on the appeal is notified.

    4. For reasons of labour market policies, Member States may give priority to EU citizens and nationals of States parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area and also to legally resident third-country nationals.

    (Bold and italics are my added emphasis)
    In other words, the effect would be to force the member state to get its ass in gear and actually process the (initial) asylum applications.

    Ireland is the only EU state to which this directive does not apply (The UK has opted-in to it). I, personally, suspect this has more to do with the Dept of Justice not wanting to have to work to deadlines rather than any principled objections to the contents of the directive on their part.

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    Moderator Conor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Parlon View Post
    That's pretty clear (if pretty shortsighted IMO) Thanks for responding.
    That's Labour Youth policy.
    Nothing will motivate the lazy / apathetic / Americanised / west-British types to embrace their culture and the Irish language.

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    Didnt know they had any at all???? :-O

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    Politics.ie Member Kevin Parlon's Avatar
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    Could anyone point me to official labour party policy vis a vis Asylum Seekers? Thank you Conor for pointing that our as a Labour Youth doc. It seems they are in favour of a relaxation of laws surrouding the process and I am keen to understand just what it is they intend to do. Thank you.
    "It is amazing how many people think that they can answer an argument by attributing bad motives to those who disagree with them." - Thomas Sowell

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    Politics.ie Member FutureTaoiseach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Passer-by View Post
    I would presume (perhaps wrongly) that their intention would be to bring Ireland into line with the provisions of the EU directive laying down minimum standards for the reception of asylum seekers (2003/9/EC).

    In it, the section on employment states:



    In other words, the effect would be to force the member state to get its ass in gear and actually process the (initial) asylum applications.

    Ireland is the only EU state to which this directive does not apply (The UK has opted-in to it). I, personally, suspect this has more to do with the Dept of Justice not wanting to have to work to deadlines rather than any principled objections to the contents of the directive on their part.
    It's easier for a country of tens of millions of taxpayers to afford large numbers of asylum seekers than one of just a few million. And experience of EU Enlargement has been that the cake actually gets smaller when you increase foreign-national access to the labour market (the CSO says the Irish economy has returned to its 2002 size).

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    Quote Originally Posted by FutureTaoiseach View Post
    It's easier for a country of tens of millions of taxpayers to afford large numbers of asylum seekers than one of just a few million. And experience of EU Enlargement has been that the cake actually gets smaller when you increase foreign-national access to the labour market (the CSO says the Irish economy has returned to its 2002 size).
    As much as you try to deny it FT, you are an xenophobe.

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    Politics.ie Member FutureTaoiseach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ManUnited View Post
    As much as you try to deny it FT, you are an xenophobe.
    As much as you try to deny it ManUnited, you are PC-gone mad. The CSO has stated that the size of the economy is at 2002 levels. Fact: EU Enlargement happened in 2004.

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