Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 9 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 88

Thread: The famine, time to peel away the myth

  1. #1

    Default The famine, time to peel away the myth

    Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
    Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

    I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

    For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

    I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
    "in July 1940 the IRA leadership issued a statement [which] made clear that if "German forces should land in Ireland, they will land ... as friends and liberators of the Irish people".

  2. #2

    Default

    Is this a windup?
    "they should think of the positives that famine brought"

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aontas Sóvéideach na hÉireann
    Posts
    13,343
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I wouldnt call what happened in the 1840s "The Famine" - after all it was just one of a series of up to 22 famines that occured between 1720 and 1860. It would be more accurate to describe it as the most successful instance of England's Genocide of the Gaelic Nation, which began in ernest during the reign of Elizabeth I. As the poet Spencer wrote, English swords could never kill enough of the Irish - famine was the only truely effective implement of extermination.

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    115
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cael
    I wouldnt call what happened in the 1840s "The Famine" - after all it was just one of a series of up to 22 famines that occured between 1720 and 1860. It would be more accurate to describe it as the most successful instance of England's Genocide of the Gaelic Nation, which began in ernest during the reign of Elizabeth I. As the poet Spencer wrote, English swords could never kill enough of the Irish - famine was the only truely effective implement of extermination.
    Where do you get your knowledge of history from? The cartoon section of An Phoblacht?
    Nill illigitimi carborundum - don't let the b*stards get you down.

    Economic Left/Right: -4.13
    Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -4.36

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aontas Sóvéideach na hÉireann
    Posts
    13,343
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Analyser
    Quote Originally Posted by Cael
    I wouldnt call what happened in the 1840s "The Famine" - after all it was just one of a series of up to 22 famines that occured between 1720 and 1860. It would be more accurate to describe it as the most successful instance of England's Genocide of the Gaelic Nation, which began in ernest during the reign of Elizabeth I. As the poet Spencer wrote, English swords could never kill enough of the Irish - famine was the only truely effective implement of extermination.
    Where do you get your knowledge of history from? The cartoon section of An Phoblacht?
    If I hear of any secondhand brains for sale I will let you know Anal-yser, but you are probably happier, as you are, without one.

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Re: The famine, time to peel away the myth

    Quote Originally Posted by red white blue and green
    Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
    Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

    I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

    For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

    I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
    ... just remind me again when the last time was that the Irish people en masse "went on" about the Famine.? I think that, for whatever it was worth or not, once Blair's govt did a bit of an apology and (some of) the Irish became a bit richer recently, most of the ill feeling has died away.... so why are you whinging tonight?!?
    "To stand inquiring right, is not to stray,
    To sleep, or run wrong is"
    - John Donne

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    South Derry
    Posts
    63
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anmajornarthainig
    Is this a windup?
    "they should think of the positives that famine brought"
    Yep, looks like yous have been Pogo-ed...don't worry the effects will wear off.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Aontas Sóvéideach na hÉireann
    Posts
    13,343
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Re: The famine, time to peel away the myth

    Quote Originally Posted by Samarkand
    Quote Originally Posted by red white blue and green
    Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
    Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

    I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

    For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

    I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
    ... just remind me again when the last time was that the Irish people en masse "went on" about the Famine.? I think that, for whatever it was worth or not, once Blair's govt did a bit of an apology and (some of) the Irish became a bit richer recently, most of the ill feeling has died away.... so why are you whinging tonight?!?
    Your right, most Irish people today would rather rattle on about property prices and the so called "Celtic Tiger," than remember the slavery and genocide their ancestors faced. In fact, a lot of them would like to pretend that it never happened, and that the English were always our best friends. Such pathetic delusion must be quite rare in the word?

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Armagh
    Posts
    2,104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Re: The famine, time to peel away the myth

    Quote Originally Posted by red white blue and green
    Is it about time that we stop going on about how those bloody brits caused so much hardship during the potato famine of the 1840's?
    Afterall it was irish landowners who turfed the poor peasants of the land and directly profited from their misfortune.

    I am sick and tired of us Brits getting smashed round the head over this.

    For too long the irish nation has had a chip on their shoulder, they should think of the positives that the famine brought ie emmigration to the new world and a better life.

    I dont want to rub in salt into anceient wounds but the myths need to be blown away on this subject.
    Nice try but your obvious attempt to wind up some irish people is pathetic.
    Go grab some war drums and dress up like a clown and march through some catholic old age pensioner area.

    This post doesnt surprise me, there is absoloutly no limits whatsoever to what unionists will deny.

    The only thing that i believe resembles this ludacris denial on the same scale would be this eejits comments ......


    " The Americans have all been defeated Iraq is safe "
    Abstinence makes the Church grow fondlers.

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Ballymena
    Posts
    207
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    It has always been the same - just after the famine the Marchioness of Derry had inscribed on the Cut Rock below Garron Point a rambling drivel - emulated here by her (political) descendants - about how good the English were providing people with work schemes during the famine and so on.

    Good taste prevailed during the war in independance and someone chiseled most of it out
    Romanticist 75%, Fundamentalist 69%, Idealist 63%, Cultural Creative 63%, Postmodernist 56%, Modernist 44%, Existentialist 44%, Materialist 19%

    Pro Deo, Rege et Patria, Hibernia Unanimis

Page 1 of 9 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •