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Thread: The 'We' of Peter Sutherland.

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    Default The 'We' of Peter Sutherland.

    All citizens are equal, at least in theory, but some turn up in more Boardrooms and more TV screens than others. Peter Sutherland's Goldman Sachs outlet in Dublin has just reported profits in excess on €1 million euro per employee. Last night he was on RTÉ's After Shock.

    Fintan O'Toole's writes about his use of the word 'we' in this type of interview.

    “We,” he told us, “have to gird our loins to take tough decisions and see it through . . . This is where we show our mettle.”

    This rallying cry might be more impressive if Sutherland had girded his own loins and shown some mettle when “we” really needed him to do so. He is one of the most distinguished Irishmen of his generation, a man of immense ability and capacity to lead. Precisely because he is idolised in the Irish business community, he had the opportunity to change the culture of Irish banking. Had he taken it, “we” would not be in the loin-girding business at the moment.

    Actually, Sutherland had this opportunity twice – first when he was chairman of Allied Irish Banks from 1989 to 1993, and president of the Irish Bankers’ Federation (IBF).


    Reminding us of events that emerged during his watch, O'Toole notes:

    When the PAC report was published, with its damning conclusion that “eminent” bank directors did little to enforce ethical standards, Sutherland had nothing to say. Given that he was the most eminent of all, that silence was one of the reasons why the culture of Irish banking remained so lethally intact.

    And Sutherland has sailed blithely onwards, indefatigably smug and unshakeably self-assured. His “we” is now more copious, stretching as it does to the whole field of global finance capitalism.


    His banking endeavours were not confined to our shores, nor were they all as successful as GS - he was a director of

    Royal Bank of Scotland when it engaged in the recklessness that has cost the British taxpayer at least £45 billion (€52.55 billion) so far, and sat on the remuneration committee that lavished huge bonuses on its chief executive.



    Sutherland could have led by example - The Irish Times - Tue, May 11, 2010
    Last edited by He3; 8th October 2010 at 02:42 PM.
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair.

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    I was waiting for a thread on this all day after i read Fintan's latest populist nothing of a rant.

    Sutherland didn't say anything that wasn't 100% correct and Fintan the communist basically says that this guy isn't allowed offer his opinion because he's done well for himself in life and works for Goldman.

    People need to rise above this short of crap.

  3. #3
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    Ah good auld Peter Sutherland. If he was running against the Bert, I'd canvass for Ahern.

    Peter wouldn't challenge the banking system, are you serious?. His bank Goldman Sachs do not have a culture that any bank should be allowed emulate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Big_Fellow View Post
    Ah good auld Peter Sutherland. If he was running against the Bert, I'd canvass for Ahern.

    Peter wouldn't challenge the banking system, are you serious?. His bank Goldman Sachs do not have a culture that any bank should be allowed emulate.
    Have you worked for Goldman?

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    Didn't Goldman Sachs advise the Greek government a couple of years ago on something.

    Oh that's right they advised them they should enter the Euro. I wonder was the cooking of the books in Greece related to this advice?

    They also played a part in the subprime bubble in the US.

    I would never listen to anything Peter Sutherland has to say on any subject.

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    Yawn, here we go again. You guys are like a bunch of 80s teenagers, queueing up to proclaim how much you hate Thatcher, while forgetting to wash your hair.
    "So how are things at the Campaign for the Freedom of Information, by the way?" "Sorry, I can't talk about that"

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    Quote Originally Posted by anewbeginning View Post
    Didn't Goldman Sachs advise the Greek government a couple of years ago on something.

    Oh that's right they advised them they should enter the Euro. I wonder was the cooking of the books in Greece related to this advice?

    They also played a part in the subprime bubble in the US.

    I would never listen to anything Peter Sutherland has to say on any subject.
    Seriously i don't think anything you stated above relating to Goldman is factually correct.

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    Quote Originally Posted by He3 View Post
    All citizens are equal, at least in theory, but some turn up in more Boardrooms and more TV screens than others. Peter Sutherland's Goldman Sachs outlet in Dublin has just reported profits in excess on €1 million euro per employee. Last night he was on RTÉ's After Shock.

    Fintan O'Toole's writes about his use of the word 'we' in this type of interview.

    “We,” he told us, “have to gird our loins to take tough decisions and see it through . . . This is where we show our mettle.”

    This rallying cry might be more impressive if Sutherland had girded his own loins and shown some mettle when “we” really needed him to do so. He is one of the most distinguished Irishmen of his generation, a man of immense ability and capacity to lead. Precisely because he is idolised in the Irish business community, he had the opportunity to change the culture of Irish banking. Had he taken it, “we” would not be in the loin-girding business at the moment.

    Actually, Sutherland had this opportunity twice – first when he was chairman of Allied Irish Banks from 1989 to 1993, and president of the Irish Bankers’ Federation (IBF).
    .


    Sutherland could have led by example - The Irish Times - Tue, May 11, 2010


    Yet the same IT is totally complicit in the media black out as to why Sutherland was in Dublin in the first place.
    Bilderberg Found | EUTimes.net

    The europhile 'Irish Times' is such blatant controlled opposition to the New World Order.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hiding behind a poster View Post
    Yawn, here we go again. You guys are like a bunch of 80s teenagers, queueing up to proclaim how much you hate Thatcher, while forgetting to wash your hair.
    Your blind spot is showing.
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grafter1 View Post
    Seriously i don't think anything you stated above relating to Goldman is factually correct.
    Just for a start

    Greek Debt Crisis: How Goldman Sachs Helped Greece to Mask its True Debt - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International

    All legal of course.

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