Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 21 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 209

Thread: Communism and libertarianism have failed- distributism is our hope for the future

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member Almanac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Night of the Senses
    Posts
    3,180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Communism and libertarianism have failed- distributism is our hope for the future

    Communism has been tried and tested and found severely wanting. But so has libertarianism:

    And he may even say, as many of his and Mises’s supporters do, that Reagan and Thatcher and Pinochet and 100 others “didn’t do it right.” The problem with this is that it is precisely the same as the defense of Marx: “Stalin (or Reagan) was not a good test of my theory…” But they may be the best test the theories can sustain. Hayek would be horrified by Reagan, and Marx would be mortified by Stalin. But both seem to end in the same place. Both Marx and Mises promised a “withering away of the state”; both delivered states of enormous power, expense, and tyranny.

    When the application of a theory always ends up the same way, we are entitled to think that is the only way it can end. Why do theories in application differ so much from their predicted results? Both Marx and Mises run up against the Law of Unintended Consequences. Since consequences are potentially infinite and intentions necessarily finite, this law is always operative. But when a theory is incomplete relative to the phenomenon it purports to describe, then the unintended consequences will always outweigh the intended ones. Usually, the system doubles back on itself to become its opposite. The moral of this story is you can only judge a theory that purports to describe human systems by seeing how it works on the ground.

    Source

    There is another way: distributism

    What is distributism?

    According to Thomas Storck

    distributism is nothing more than an economic system in which private property is well distributed, in which "as many people as possible" are in fact owners. Probably the most complete statement of distributism can be found in Hilaire Belloc's book, The Restoration of Property (1936). Note the title, The Restoration of Property. For the distributists argued that under capitalism property, certainly productive property, was the preserve of the rich, and that this gave them an influence and power in society far beyond what they had any right to. Yes, the formal right to private property exists for all under capitalism, but in practice it is restricted to the rich. A further feature of distributism that follows from this, is that in a distributist economy, the amassing of property will have limits placed on it. Distributive justice is distributism's key principle.

    Under such a system, most people would be able to earn a living without having to rely on the use of the property of others to do so. Examples of people earning a living in this way would be farmers who own their own land and related machinery, plumbers who own their own tools, software developers who own their own computer, etc. The "co-operative" approach advances beyond this perspective to recognise that such property and equipment may be “co-owned” by local communities larger than a family, e.g. partners in a business.

    Source

    There are many examples of the successful application of distributist theory in cooperative systems such as:

    "[the] Mondragón Cooperative Corporation (MCC). Recently, the workers in the Fagor Appliance Factory in Mondragón, Spain, received an 8% cut in pay. This is not unusual in such hard economic times. What is unusual is that the workers voted themselves this pay cut. They could do this because the workers are also the owners of the firm."

    Distributist also has concrete policy proposals, such as those formulated by Allan Carlson:

    To break up, prudently, the great, politically-favored banks;
    To sharply restrict the revolving door between regulated banks and corporations and the regulatory agencies;
    To focus mortgage lending on small, locally controlled savings banks (such as the pre-1981 American “Savings and Loans”) and Credit Unions;
    To replace welfare benefits with opportunities for property ownership and the creation of “children’s trusts.”
    To limit direct and indirect mortgage subsidies – including tax benefits – to only one residence per family (disallowing them on “second” or vacation homes and investment properties);
    To let real bankruptcy courts divvy up failed, albeit politically favored dinosaurs like General Motors;
    To move toward a modest, uniform protective tariff;
    To fill the prisons with white-collar criminals who have violated the public trust through fraud;
    To redirect farm subsidies ($20 Billion annually in the USA) away from vast agri-businesses toward the encouragement of small, general purpose farms (with the quid pro quo that families receiving assistance would open their properties to visiting school children, and so on)
    To loosen zoning laws and other restrictive covenants so as to allow greater use of family homes as places of work and production for market (e.g., telecommuting, professional offices)
    To make credit available, at favored rates, to new family businesses and other micro-enterprises.
    To impose a progressive corporate income tax on retail giants;
    To improve the highway system; and
    To focus tax relief on families with dependent children.

    The grow your own movement together with the increased interest in self-sufficiency, subsidiarity, sustainability, local production, and local currencies all seem to fit very well into the distributist model.

    Distributism is our best hope for the future.
    Last edited by Almanac; 16th March 2011 at 02:18 AM. Reason: To correct formatting problem
    What shall it profit a man to gain the whole world and suffer the loss of his own soul?

  2. #2
    The_Big_Fellow
    Guest

    Default

    That is a very interesting post. I must read further in to that. It really seems to empower people to be entrepreneurs.

  3. #3
    Gadjodilo
    Guest

    Default

    Nick Griffin (BNP leader) is allegedly a fan.

    The March to the Far Right - TIME

    So was Mahatma Gandhi.

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member Almanac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Night of the Senses
    Posts
    3,180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Big_Fellow View Post
    That is a very interesting post. I must read further in to that. It really seems to empower people to be entrepreneurs.
    This is a good overview of the theory (and practice):

    The Economics of Distributism Part 1: Does Capitalism Work? | Front Porch Republic
    What shall it profit a man to gain the whole world and suffer the loss of his own soul?

  5. #5
    Moderator Cato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ithaca
    Posts
    20,762
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Almanac View Post
    Distributism is our best hope for the future.
    You forgot to mention that it is also a part of the little known (unfortunately) Catholic Social teaching.
    “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty, than those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson (yeah, I'm aware of the irony)

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    4,497
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Interesting Almanac. That's a new term on me. Is there a significant difference between the principles of distributism and those of social democracy?
    Conservatives seem to believe that the rich will work harder if we give them more, and the poor will work harder if we give them less. E.J. Dionne

  7. #7
    The_Big_Fellow
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cato View Post
    You forgot to mention that it is also a part of the little known (unfortunately) Catholic Social teaching.
    Oh my God the Papishes came up with it...

    Cop yourself on. Can you not detract your sectarian beliefs from something that obviously has potential.

  8. #8
    Moderator Cato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ithaca
    Posts
    20,762
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Big_Fellow View Post
    Oh my God the Papishes came up with it...

    Cop yourself on. Can you not detract your sectarian beliefs from something that obviously has potential.
    Ehhh... cop yourself on. You may have noticed that I said the the church's Social teaching was unfortunately unknown. I happen to agree with a lot of the Catholic Church's Social teaching but it is the best kept secret of them all. It deserves more attention, as Almanac has delivered here.

    Even the Catholic church gets something right every now and then.
    “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty, than those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson (yeah, I'm aware of the irony)

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,232
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Distributism has had rather strange promoters and theorists from day one, and continues to attract them. Support for it tends to come from middle class people frightened of both the ruling class which is in the process of proletarianizing them above and the "mob" below.

    Eric Gill, the Pedophile Founder of Distributism by Patrick Odou

    Hillaire Belloc: An Admirer of Mussolini and Fascism by Patrick Odou

    J. Christopher Pryor: Internatioal Third Position

    Fringe Watch: John Sharpe

  10. #10
    Moderator Cato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ithaca
    Posts
    20,762
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SevenStars View Post
    Distributism has had rather strange promoters and theorists from day one, and continues to attract them. Support for it tends to come from middle class people frightened of both the ruling class which is in the process of proletarianizing them above and the "mob" below.
    I think that you are confusing it with corporativism.

    Also, what do you have against the middle classes? You communists always seem to hold the middle classes in particular distain.
    “I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty, than those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas Jefferson (yeah, I'm aware of the irony)

Page 1 of 21 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •