Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 7 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 69

Thread: In praise of Brian Lenihan

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member Aristodemus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    3,724
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default In praise of Brian Lenihan

    What the hell is that all about? Quite a few commentators are now telling us that he is the man of 2009, being a man of principle and not to be dissuaded from the correct course to right the economy. It seems to me that most of this praise is because he is not Brian Cowen, which is a pretty threadbare basis on which to make an assessment.
    Since becoming Minister for Finance he has shown himself to be as inept as any of his predecessors and certainly is likely to have cost the country more in the long-run.
    As I see it he has had 3 budgets, October '08, April '09 and December '09. Each one was a panic reaction to the economic downturn. He had a chance to deal with the fiscal deficit with a certain amount of reform of the taxation system but kicked it into touch by setting up the Commission on Taxation. When they reported he binned the report.
    He set up An Bord Snip to make the hard unpalatable decisions for him. It duly reported and he binned that one.
    He obviously missed Economics 1.01 when sitting his Leaving Certificate. You do not inflate an economy when it is in the middle of a boom and you do not deflate it during recession. Of course we do it that way because as a lawyer he'd know all about it.
    Man of the Year my arse.

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Somewhere between Akureyri and Ushuaia
    Posts
    8,999
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    This currently my favourite portrait of Lenihan:



    But you've got to admire him. He can sell snow to eskimos.

    And for what it's worth I wish him a happy and healthy retirement from politics.

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member sauntersplash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    3,456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Just before the execution of Marie Antoinette by "the people", the mob which had congregated to celebrate the event, (the same group which had just dragged her from her palace,) chanted the words, "long live Marie Antoinette, long live the Queen".

    Madness is rare in individuals, in crowds it is the rule.

    Hypocrisy, likewise.
    "No." - Rosa Parks

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Republic of Ireland
    Posts
    200
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I think Lenihan's most recent budget (where he finally refused pointblankly to be pushed around by the ditherer Cowen and the trade unions) may well be the first important step in bringing economic recovery. For this he should be lauded.

    It was a harsh budget, but it was fair. Ray MacSharry was once deemed a heartless villain. Now he is regarded as a national hero. Politics is a fickle old business.

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bandit Country
    Posts
    197
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    He had a shaky start in difficult circumstances and I think NAMA is a load of sh1te. However, his last budget was a step in the right direction.
    If once the people become inattentive to the public affairs, you and I, and Congress and Assemblies, Judges and Governors, shall all become wolves. It seems to be the law of our general nature, in spite of individual exceptions.

    Thomas Jefferson

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,697
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    his retirement day will be a sad one for his many admirers, however I feel he will be better off fighting this in private, I wish him all the best.....

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member Pauli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pfäffikon, Kanton Schwyz, Switzerland.
    Posts
    1,181
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    If Lenihan has to retire due to his illness, it will be a sad end to a career that was only beginning to reveal its full potential. While there are many on this forum ready to criticise NAMA, it has to be said that Lenihan was handed a poisoned chalice and was charged with sorting out the appalling mess made of the economy by Ahern, McCreevy, Harney and Biffo. These are the shysters in whose direction public ire and rage should be directed.

    After a shaky start, Lenihan showed definite signs of getting to grips with a portfolio he never wanted and for which, unlike his previous portfolio, he was not particularly qualified. He comes across as a decent man whose integrity, in sharp contrast to many in his party, cannot be called into question.

    I wish him a speedy and successful recovery.
    Fianna Fail - The Loss of Sovereignty Party.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    6,212
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Leaving aside the tradegy for himself and his family, it is a bodyblow to national confidence. He was the politician of the year, by a country mile.

    That said, Nama will be his legacy and it is not a good one.

    The other factor is that he is Fianna Fail to his core and he will use his illness to maximum effect to benefit the Party. The other parties can do little about it.

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member MsAnneThrope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    pɹɐʍɹoℲ ƃuıoפ
    Posts
    1,819
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pauli View Post
    He comes across as a decent man whose integrity, in sharp contrast to many in his party, cannot be called into question.
    I would have to disagree with you on this point Pauli. The fact that he stayed in the party after what Haughey did with the funds raised for his father's liver transplant proved to me that he was just another brainwashed 'party first' FF'er. As are Mary & Conor too in my opinion. There are lines that cannot and should not be crossed and what Haughey did was extremely distasteful and beyond belief. There are people that if a FF minister ate their children would still defend and vote for them, and remain members of the party.

    As someone said here a few weeks ago supporting or being a member of a party should not be like supporting/playing for a football team. When you or your family or your country have been disgracefully and shamefully betrayed there is only one option. He should have chosen a career outside politics, or at least outside Fianna Fáil.

    The 'party first' mentality has a lot to do with the mess we're in today, will delay our recovery, and will ultimately lead to further as yet unknown messes down the road. Country first - or get out of politics. Call me old-fashioned but the Lenihans should have left FF years ago IMO. I have always questioned their motivations for staying since.
    Last edited by MsAnneThrope; 31st December 2009 at 04:23 PM.
    We all love animals. Why do we call some 'pets' and others 'dinner'?

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member cyberianpan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Wherever I can see
    Posts
    16,730
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aristodemus View Post
    He obviously missed Economics 1.01 when sitting his Leaving Certificate. You do not inflate an economy when it is in the middle of a boom and you do not deflate it during recession. Of course we do it that way because as a lawyer he'd know all about it.
    Man of the Year my arse.
    Methinks you missed economics lessons also

    Here's a summary of an Irish Economy piece by Philip Lane, who is pretty much our top economist. He argues against a spend side stimulus, and the comments rope in many of our other economists :

    Philip Lane Irish Economy
    fiscal expansion should be pursued where it makes sense but “one size does not fit all” and some conditions call for a different fiscal approach.

    Here are some of the key issues (but please read my actual papers if you want the more detailed versions of these arguments):....
    this list is my summary:
    1. pre existing specific bubbles in Ireland
    2. lack of control of our currency value
    3. runaway public sector pay
    4. lack of large government surpluses during the boom
    5. problems largely structural, GDP increase alone not sufficient
    6. deomgraphic problems
    7. high cost of debt funding for Ireland

    For such reasons, I consider that those who advocate an ‘off the shelf’ Keynesian prescription (as advocated by Danny Blanchflower yesterday) do not have a correct diagnosis of Ireland’s current economic and fiscal situation. The standard Keynesian prescription is appropriate if an economy on a sustainable growth path and with sustainable public finances has been temporarily knocked off course by a demand slump. For the reasons given above, this is not the situation in Ireland

    Comment by Colm McCarthy:

    Philip’s central point, and the burden of Patrick Honohan’s remarks to the recent ESRI/Foundation for Fiscal Studies conference, is this: we are not redressing a fiscal imbalance deriving from a cyclical downturn. We are trying to recover from a Bubble.

    Two bubbles actually - a public spending bubble (including public payroll) and a credit-fuelled property bubble. These were home-grown, but are compounded by the strong exchange rate, the worldwide credit crunch and international real economy downturn. David Blanchflower has missed these points about the Irish situation.

    Comment by Colm Harmon
    Philip reasonably presents why the situation is not one that allows ONE PART of the Blanchflower message (the spend spend spend argument) to follow through in Ireland.
    ...
    is that the core message is well understood as portrayed by Philip in this post, by Colm McCarthy and other, and indeed very directly by John Fitzgerald
    Furthermore here is a post budget analysis by Prof Gregory Connor that makes clear there is wide consensus amongst Irish economists that the budget & fiscal policies are correct:

    Prof Gregory Connor- Irish Economy
    For faithful members of the 46-ers*, the new government budget proposal creates cognitive dissonance. How could a government so wasteful in its bank-bailout policies produce a general government budget proposal that seems so carefully and sensibly crafted to address current fiscal and competitiveness problems? In contrast to bank-bailout policies, the new general budget seems reasonable, balanced and fair, but as stringent in difficult circumstances as could possibly be asked.

    cYp
    "Yawn , am I alive yet ?"

Page 1 of 7 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •