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Thread: Paul Gogarty featured on tonight's HIGNFY - video given to BBC by Oireachtas?

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    Default Paul Gogarty featured on tonight's HIGNFY - video given to BBC by Oireachtas?

    Clip not online that I can see just yet, but the clip of Paul Gogarty was in the first few minutes of the show. About 7 mins methinks....

    One point I'd make, is at the start of the clip of Gogarty on HIGNFY the follow appears in the top left corner.

    © Houses of the Oireachtas
    Parliamentary Broadcasting Unit 2009
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJbvS841Pps"]YouTube- HIGNFY S38E09 Part 1/3[/ame]

    So, it would appear that the clip isn't from Youtube, but actually issued by the Broadcasting Unit to the BBC.

    But aren't there rules about Irish shows using Oireachtas clips for satirical purposes? Why would they give it to a UK based satirical show when the laws preclude them from doing so here?
    Last edited by David Cochrane; 19th December 2009 at 03:15 PM. Reason: Added HIGNFY video clip

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    Good point . Did Paul Merton say anything funny ?

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    Politics.ie Member Panopticon's Avatar
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    Yep Dave. It's not just "satirical purposes" that are restricted; it's quite specific:

    "... that recordings or extracts of the proceedings shall not be used in programmes of light entertainment, political satire, party political broadcasts or in any form of advertising or publicity, other than in the form of news and current affairs programme trailers...".

    So no matter the argument about the purpose of the clip, it's clear that HIGNFY could not have broadcast the clip if it had been subject to Irish law.

    The UK has a similar rule for its parliamentary footage.

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    Yeah, I thought this too.

    So if this was just a Youtube clip - it couldn't be used on an Irish show - but could be elsewhere.

    However, as the clip has a copyright notice, it means that the BBC sought to obtain the clip and/or (at the very least) obtain official permission to use it - which, by the copyright notice, they got.

    Thus the Oireachtas Broadcasting Unit has broken it's own law (rules).

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    Ian Hislop ? Professional satirist . Surely he had a wry remark to contribute?

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    Damn. I missed it. What did the panel say?

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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungLiberal View Post
    Damn. I missed it. What did the panel say?
    'Shh , its a legal matter ! '
    Said Hislop .Allegedly

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    Politics.ie Member seabhcan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panopticon View Post
    "... that recordings or extracts of the proceedings shall not be used in programmes of light entertainment, political satire, party political broadcasts or in any form of advertising or publicity, other than in the form of news and current affairs programme trailers...".
    An idiotic law...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Panopticon View Post
    Yep Dave. It's not just "satirical purposes" that are restricted; it's quite specific:

    "... that recordings or extracts of the proceedings shall not be used in programmes of light entertainment, political satire, party political broadcasts or in any form of advertising or publicity, other than in the form of news and current affairs programme trailers...".

    So no matter the argument about the purpose of the clip, it's clear that HIGNFY could not have broadcast the clip if it had been subject to Irish law.

    The UK has a similar rule for its parliamentary footage.
    Frankly the rule is unenforceable. Broadcasters in Ireland and Britain get the film of what happens in the Dáil as it happens. So no doubt the BBC already had it. RTÉ certainly had. TV3 apparently forgot to 'take' it and had to ring up asking for a copy. Local radio stations, if they forgot to take it, ring up the broadcasting unit and ask for a copy. In practice it is next to impossible to enforce. So you ring up the BBC to say "now lads, that thing you have a copy of, would you mind not using it in programmes of light entertainment, political satire, party political broadcasts or in any form of advertising or publicity?" When the rules were written there was a chance of enforcing it, and a clear distinction between types of programmes. Modern technology, the internet and the changing shape of broadcasting makes it next to impossible to enforce those sorts of distinctions anymore. Serious programmes do satire. Satirical programmes do serious issues, etc. The Frontline is a current affairs programme that includes satire (well, attempts at it). So is it satirical or current affairs?

    At this stage if the BU tried to enforce the rules they would need to have their legal department working on it full-time to deal with all the uses clips are put to. They would have youtube and others and their direct dials to tell them almost hourly to take down the latest clips. And all the political parties use clips of Dáil debates on their websites, etc. How are you going to stop them?

    It is simply a case of a law that is now unworkable and which is more honoured in its breach than its observance. It is about as unworkable as the law which was only recently repealed which required "motor vehicles" to go no faster than 5 mph and for the law that still exists on the payments of some salaries in guineas. (Or the rules about being required to wear a sword when crossing the quadrangle in TCD!)

    About all the BU could do is to ring up the BBC and say "Ah Jaysus, lads, will yis stop using clips of the Dáil on HIGHFY?" (When told "No", as all broadcasters would say, about all the BU could say is "ok" and leave it at that!)
    "In [Ireland] a wife is regarded as a chattel, just as a thoroughbred mare or cow." Mr Justice Butler in the Irish courts. 'Traditional Marriage' in the 1970s.

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    Yes , the Dail is a joke ! We must protect the integrity of it ! Who do we sue ? Will we get more than Albert Reynolds ?

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