Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 8 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 76

Thread: 720,000 in Poverty In Ireland: how will be there after the Banks have been saved?

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dublin.
    Posts
    41
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default 720,000 in Poverty In Ireland: how will be there after the Banks have been saved?

    Some Stark facts:
    For 2008:
    44% of unemployed individuals were at
    risk of poverty.

    Just under one in five of those with a
    chronic illness were at risk of poverty.

    6.9% of the population experience
    consistent poverty.

    In 2006 almost one in three lone
    parent households and 11.1% of
    children experienced consistent poverty
    both increased since 2005.


    Overall 17% of people were at risk of
    poverty using the Irish measurement.
    This includes 39.6 % of lone parents,
    25.8% of those with primary education
    or less and 6.5% of those in work.

    Source: http://www.eapn.ie/documents/15_EAPN%20PAPER%201.pdf


    Every problem in Ireland which requires the spending of tax-payers money, will always be referenced to the Bank bailout. But the situation could not be more diverse. NAMA could cost 7bn, 30bn and the Bond holders will be spared. The higher interest payments will just have to borne by the tax-payer. The quasi-nationalisiation of banks are seen as investments, but there is no similar approach to the poor. Particulary those who are consistently in poverty.

    Consistent Poverty
    This measures those who are at-risk-of-poverty and
    who are also unable to afford one of a set of eight
    agreed items. These items are known as deprivation
    items. Inability to afford one of these items means
    that someone is marginalised and excluded from
    participating in what are considered normal activities
    in society. The list has been updated for 2007
    onwards9 however, the eight agreed items for current
    poverty statistics are:
    - No substantial meal for at least one day in the
    past two weeks due to lack of money
    - Had to go without heating during the last year
    through lack of money
    - Experienced dept problems arising from
    ordinary living expenses
    - Unable to afford two pairs of strong shoes
    - Unable to afford a roast dinner once a week
    - Unable to afford a meal with meat, chicken,
    fish (or vegetarian equivalent) every second day
    - Unable to afford new (not second-hand) clothes
    - Unable to afford a warm waterproof coat

    The numbers in Relative Poverty (calculated at 60% of median income) would equate 17% of the population. 60% of Median Income is 202 for 2008, most social welfare payments are 204. Relative poverty is less stark but it highlights the disparity in income levels and one does not need to be an expert to see a link between high income inequality and crime, depression and suicide.

    What needs to be done:
    1) Social Welfare rates must RISE for 2009/2010.
    2) The Greens need to pull out of government if there is any further talk of reducing social welfare or the minimum wage.
    3) The barriers/social welfare traps need to be removed - a person must not face a threat of losing benefits or allowances by taking a part-time job, education/training or other impediment from activeely seeking employment (eg childminding for partner/family).
    4) A basic income system should be considered for those in consistent poverty for greater than a year. Basic Income
    5) All of the politcal parties need to sign up to the above and those who reject it shamed.

    NAMA, ACC, FAS, John O'D, Thornton Hall, Luas overruns, are scandalous but pale into insignificance of the scandal of 1 in 6 people in Ireland being in poverty at the end of our greatest boom in history.

  2. #2

    Default

    The Thatcherite polices of Fianna Fail and the PDs have ensured many single mothers are reduced to a state of semi-starvation.

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    6,147
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Delusional or careerist? View Post
    Some Stark facts:
    For 2008:
    44% of unemployed individuals were at
    risk of poverty.

    Just under one in five of those with a
    chronic illness were at risk of poverty.

    6.9% of the population experience
    consistent poverty.

    In 2006 almost one in three lone
    parent households and 11.1% of
    children experienced consistent poverty
    both increased since 2005.


    Overall 17% of people were at risk of
    poverty using the Irish measurement.
    This includes 39.6 % of lone parents,
    25.8% of those with primary education
    or less and 6.5% of those in work.

    Source: http://www.eapn.ie/documents/15_EAPN%20PAPER%201.pdf


    Every problem in Ireland which requires the spending of tax-payers money, will always be referenced to the Bank bailout. But the situation could not be more diverse. NAMA could cost 7bn, 30bn and the Bond holders will be spared. The higher interest payments will just have to borne by the tax-payer. The quasi-nationalisiation of banks are seen as investments, but there is no similar approach to the poor. Particulary those who are consistently in poverty.




    The numbers in Relative Poverty (calculated at 60% of median income) would equate 17% of the population. 60% of Median Income is 202 for 2008, most social welfare payments are 204. Relative poverty is less stark but it highlights the disparity in income levels and one does not need to be an expert to see a link between high income inequality and crime, depression and suicide.

    What needs to be done:
    1) Social Welfare rates must RISE for 2009/2010.
    2) The Greens need to pull out of government if there is any further talk of reducing social welfare or the minimum wage.
    3) The barriers/social welfare traps need to be removed - a person must not face a threat of losing benefits or allowances by taking a part-time job, education/training or other impediment from activeely seeking employment (eg childminding for partner/family).
    4) A basic income system should be considered for those in consistent poverty for greater than a year. Basic Income
    5) All of the politcal parties need to sign up to the above and those who reject it shamed.

    NAMA, ACC, FAS, John O'D, Thornton Hall, Luas overruns, are scandalous but pale into insignificance of the scandal of 1 in 6 people in Ireland being in poverty at the end of our greatest boom in history.
    Your suggestions would result in massive welfare and spending cuts after the IMF enter. You seem to fail to realise that we have to borrow money from other people at the moment. International investors don't care about your laudable aims and will pull the plug if they think we aren't reducing our deficit. Please deal with reality rather than a Walter Mitty wish list.

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dublin.
    Posts
    41
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by edwin View Post
    Your suggestions would result in massive welfare and spending cuts after the IMF enter. You seem to fail to realise that we have to borrow money from other people at the moment. International investors don't care about your laudable aims and will pull the plug if they think we aren't reducing our deficit. Please deal with reality rather than a Walter Mitty wish list.
    A 16 rise a week in social welfare would cost approx.
    440,000 people on dole - 366m
    640,000 people on other social welfare - 532m.

    By way of contrast the cost of State subsidies to Private Pensions in 2.9bn in 2007.
    NCAOP - Consultation Responses - Green Paper on Pensions


    That is for a increase which is highly unlikely at present.The miniumum which should occur is reform of the schemes to reduce beurocracy eg Basic Income, but that the rates remain unchanged.

    There is serious talk of cuts in Social Welfare rates - that should be a source of outrage.

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by
    The numbers in Relative Poverty (calculated at 60% of median income) would equate 17% of the population. 60% of Median Income is 202 for 2008, most social welfare payments are 204. Relative poverty is less stark but it highlights the disparity in income levels and one does not need to be an expert to see a link between high income inequality and crime, depression and suicide.

    What needs to be done:
    1) Social Welfare rates must RISE for 2009/2010.
    2) The Greens need to pull out of government if there is any further talk of reducing social welfare or the minimum wage.
    3) The barriers/social welfare traps need to be removed - a person must not face a threat of losing benefits or allowances by taking a part-time job, education/training or other impediment from activeely seeking employment (eg childminding for partner/family).
    4) A basic income system should be considered for those in consistent poverty for greater than a year. [url=http://www.cori.ie/Justice/Basic_Income
    Basic Income[/url]
    5) All of the politcal parties need to sign up to the above and those who reject it shamed.

    NAMA, ACC, FAS, John O'D, Thornton Hall, Luas overruns, are scandalous but pale into insignificance of the scandal of 1 in 6 people in Ireland being in poverty at the end of our greatest boom in history.
    204.30 is the max weekly payment for a single person on Jobseekers Payment, another 135.60 is paid for a qualified adult and 26 for each child.

    An example would be a married couple with one child on Jobseekers Allowance receiving over 360 per week, the couple should also qualify for rent allowance having to contribute a sum of 24 per week towards their rent leaving a household income of over 330 per week.

    Id imagine you would manage a couple of hot meals per week from that...

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    7,561
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    theese orginisations who come out with theese bogus claims every so often , do so as if they came out and said hardly anyone was at risk of poverty , they could have thier status as another QUANGO revoked in times like this

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    1,818
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey-Magic View Post
    The Thatcherite polices of Fianna Fail and the PDs have ensured many single mothers are reduced to a state of semi-starvation.
    Please have a look at the increases in the both the dole and social benefits in the last 5 years.
    I am not sure a true socialist government would of giving away as much!

    As for the OP, yes you are delusional.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    whats heppening is the top brass incl politicians ,union leaders, managers in the public service and anyone above their level will be looked after ,as for the other 3.8 million of us we are in trouble. house repossessions car repossessions, unemployment, begging for food, its all happening whilst the scum i mentioned above sit back and laugh at us in poverty

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member bob3344's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    7,059
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    'Relative Poverty' is a bu11sh1t term designed to keep the anti-poverty quangos in funding for all eternity.

    Their work , by definition, will never be done.

    I personally do not accept that long term unemployed people in receipt of our generous welfare can't afford food & heating.

    The people who are suffering are those who worked & bought houses & cars & subsequently lost their jobs.

    Moral of the story ?

    Don't ever get a job, just focus on having 6 or 7 kids. you'll get a free house & generous welfare, and you'll have no debts.

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    7,561
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob3344 View Post
    'Relative Poverty' is a bu11sh1t term designed to keep the anti-poverty quangos in funding for all eternity.

    Their work , by definition, will never be done.

    I personally do not accept that long term unemployed people in receipt of our generous welfare can't afford food & heating.

    The people who are suffering are those who worked & bought houses & cars & subsequently lost their jobs.

    Moral of the story ?

    Don't ever get a job, just focus on having 6 or 7 kids. you'll get a free house & generous welfare, and you'll have no debts.

    i dont believe the unemplyed cant afford health insurance which is why im in favour of leaving the dole alone but scrapping the HSE , privatise the whole thing and then thier will be no delay in getting rid of the surplus to requirments who,s only purpose is to supply the local fianna fail td with votes or fill the coffers of whatever union represents them , anyone who is single yet unemployed on 204 a week can afford to spend 13 euro a week on private health insurance like i do

Page 1 of 8 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •