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  1. #11
    Jim Car Jim Car is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justinian View Post
    There are 141 positions in the State Department. 24 positions of those have seen a nominee confirmed. A single nomination has failed. 21 individuals have been nominated to positions requiring Senate approval (17 of which are for ambassadorial positions). This leaves 95 (!) positions that the Trump administration has failed to provide a nominee for.

    The blame cannot really be attributed to the Senate or the Democrats, it must be attributed to the Trump administration. It has failed to nominate individuals for 68% of the positions at State (including the failed nomination for the ambassador to Belgium). The most important position that Trump did manage to nominate (and then eventually see confirmed) someone for has been a dismal failure: Tillerson.
    It needs direction from the white house which has been having its own troubles when it comes to chaos. That said with John Kelly in position and the process of filling in key white house positions, I imagine he will sooner rather then later start addressing the issue of political appointments in areas outside the white house.
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  2. #12
    gerhard dengler gerhard dengler is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toland View Post
    ... if saying it makes it so.
    Bears repeating the facts.
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  3. #13
    showbandmanager showbandmanager is offline

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    So that's twenty in 8 years for Obama , who knows maybe Donny will get to make a few next time when he's not planning on replacing the Attorney General and shutting down the Mueller investigation
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  4. #14
    Justinian Justinian is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dame_Enda View Post
    They didnt even confirm the nominee for Ambassador to the Netherlands Pete Hoekstra.
    He was nominated on July 24 2017. On July 27 2017 he was referred to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The Senate went into recess in August as it normally does. It currently takes 54 days on average for a nominee to be confirmed under Trump. The lowest average waiting time for a nominee to be confirmed was 30 days under Clinton.

    There was simply no way that Hoekstra would have been confirmed before the Senate went into recess. The Trump administration knows the political calendar. He should have made the appointment earlier if Hoekstra were to be confirmed before September at the very least.
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  5. #15
    Justinian Justinian is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Car View Post
    It needs direction from the white house which has been having its own troubles when it comes to chaos. That said with John Kelly in position and the process of filling in key white house positions, I imagine he will sooner rather then later start addressing the issue of political appointments in areas outside the white house.
    Perhaps, perhaps not. We do know that a conscious decision has been made on the part of the administration not to nominate individuals for certain positions. Trump admitted that himself. It'd be surprising if that decision did not affect the State Department.
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  6. #16
    Dame_Enda Dame_Enda is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justinian View Post
    He was nominated on July 24 2017. On July 27 2017 he was referred to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The Senate went into recess in August as it normally does. It currently takes 54 days on average for a nominee to be confirmed under Trump. The lowest average waiting time for a nominee to be confirmed was 30 days under Clinton.

    There was simply no way that Hoekstra would have been confirmed before the Senate went into recess. The Trump administration knows the political calendar. He should have made the appointment earlier if Hoekstra were to be confirmed before September at the very least.
    Technically the Senate is not in recess because they have set up "pro forma sessions" (where a token number of Senators turns up every 3 days) to block recess appointments because the SC has ruled the Senate is not in recess unless its been away for more than 3 days.
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  7. #17
    Justinian Justinian is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dame_Enda View Post
    Technically the Senate is not in recess because they have set up "pro forma sessions" (where a token number of Senators turns up every 3 days) to block recess appointments because the SC has ruled the Senate is not in recess unless its been away for more than 3 days.
    Fair enough, I was wrong to state that the Senate was in recess. The broader point regarding the political calendar still stands though given the fact that de facto the situation is the same. The Trump administration was aware of the political calendar. The appointment should have been made earlier if Hoekstra were to be confirmed before September at the very least. That is the mistake of the Trump administration.
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  8. #18
    Paddyc Paddyc is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dame_Enda View Post
    They didnt even confirm the nominee for Ambassador to the Netherlands Pete Hoekstra.
    Should have appointed him Ambassador to China instead.
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  9. #19
    Justinian Justinian is online now
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    Daniel Larison gives a rather concise, but good, explanation of what the long-term consequences of Trump and Tillerson's damage to the State Department might very well entail:

    It has been clear for a long time that Trump has no respect for diplomacy or its results, but even so the determined effort to wreck the State Department is remarkably foolish. Trump and Tillerson are not only hamstringing this administration’s foreign policy in another example of self-sabotage, but they are ensuring that future administrations will inherit a diminished, dysfunctional department. They are going to make it harder to secure U.S. interests abroad in the near term, and they are practically guaranteeing the erosion of U.S. influence everywhere. Insofar as the State Department is the chief institution responsible for American “soft” power, weakening the institution simply makes it easier for an already intervention-prone Washington to rely on “hard” power to respond to crises and conflicts. That means more unnecessary wars, at least some of which might have otherwise been avoided.
    Mattis already noted once that a less-funded State Department means that the Defense Department would have to buy more ammunition. The same holds true for a dysfunctional and diminished State Department.

    Why the Wrecking of the State Department Matters | The American Conservative
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  10. #20
    Toland Toland is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerhard dengler View Post
    Bears repeating the facts.
    followed by?

    no facts.

    Quell surprise!
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