Register to Comment
Page 104 of 105 FirstFirst ... 4 54 94102103104105 LastLast
Results 1,031 to 1,040 of 1048
Like Tree736Likes
  1. #1031
    jams odonnell jams odonnell is offline
    jams odonnell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    518

    Quote Originally Posted by TheMushyStuff View Post
    I personal don't think the SNP will get an independent Scotland.
    The EU has already given them 2 fingers, join like the rest or F off because there is no free entry.
    Now it is suicide for Scotland to be Independent.
    I think it is finally dawning on the Scots that there is no way that a country that size could survive as an independent entity. Their entire population is less than that of Greater Manchester.
    Last edited by jams odonnell; 8th May 2017 at 09:36 PM.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  2. #1032
    jams odonnell jams odonnell is offline
    jams odonnell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    518

    England freed Scotland from the barbarous influence of the Irish.
    Last edited by jams odonnell; 8th May 2017 at 09:45 PM.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  3. #1033
    Dame_Enda Dame_Enda is offline
    Dame_Enda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    32,318

    Britain Elects‏
    @britainelects

    Following
    More
    Scottish independence voting intention:

    Yes: 39% (-1)
    No: 49% (-)

    (via @YouGov / 15 - 18 May)
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  4. #1034
    Dame_Enda Dame_Enda is offline
    Dame_Enda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    32,318

    Scottish independence voting intention:

    Yes: 42% (-1)
    No: 50% (+2)

    (via Survation / 31 May - 02 Jun)
    Chgs. w/ Apr
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  5. #1035
    rainmaker rainmaker is offline
    rainmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    16,599

    Quote Originally Posted by Antóin Mac Comháin View Post
    Fact - Support for Irish, Scottish, Welsh and Cornish Nationalists and Separatists can only be measured at the ballot box.
    Indeed, and how has that worked out? The SNP took massive losses (including their parliamentary leader & their former party leader) to the Tories & their leader concedes these losses were a rejection of their demand for a second referendum.

    The fact the SNP & their second referendum have been so greatly rejected in favour of the Tories & Labour, even with Brexit, tells us that ship has well and truly sailed.

    As for Cornish nationalism it appears they've gone from 1% of the vote to not even fielding a candidate, which is probably just as well as Cornwall has gone totally Conservative.

    All as measured by the ballot box, which is as you said, the only measure that counts.
    Last edited by rainmaker; 9th June 2017 at 11:59 PM.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  6. #1036
    NYCKY NYCKY is online now
    NYCKY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    12,329

    Quote Originally Posted by Antóin Mac Comháin View Post
    Fact - Scotland hasn't been Politically Independent of London for more than 300 years.

    Fact - Support for Scottish Independence was approximately 25% in January 2014.

    Fact - Support for Scottish Independence hasn't fallen below 40% since the 1st Referendum.

    Fact - Support for Irish, Scottish, Welsh and Cornish Nationalists and Separatists can only be measured at the ballot box.

    Fact - The British Labour Party are facing annihilation at the next elections, and support for Mebyon Kernow, Plaid Cymru, the Scottish National Party and Sinn Féin is going to increase.
    Does fact #4 contradict facts #2 and #3?
    Last edited by NYCKY; 10th June 2017 at 12:12 AM.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  7. #1037
    razorblade razorblade is online now

    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,580

    I think it's safe to say any independence motion can be safely put in the dustbin in the near future, after the SNP election performance.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  8. #1038
    rainmaker rainmaker is offline
    rainmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    16,599

    Quote Originally Posted by razorblade View Post
    I think it's safe to say any independence motion can be safely put in the dustbin in the near future, after the SNP election performance.
    Not just the near future. If their indyref 2 flagship policy was so resoundingly rejected, and rejected in many case in favour of the Tories & Labour, even after Brexit , then that is probably that for generations.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  9. #1039
    Antóin Mac Comháin Antóin Mac Comháin is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    512

    Quote Originally Posted by rainmaker View Post
    Indeed, and how has that worked out? The SNP took massive losses (including their parliamentary leader & their former party leader) to the Tories & their leader concedes these losses were a rejection of their demand for a second referendum.

    The fact the SNP & their second referendum have been so greatly rejected in favour of the Tories & Labour, even with Brexit, tells us that ship has well and truly sailed.

    As for Cornish nationalism it appears they've gone from 1% of the vote to not even fielding a candidate, which is probably just as well as Cornwall has gone totally Conservative.

    All as measured by the ballot box, which is as you said, the only measure that counts.
    Quote Originally Posted by NYCKY View Post
    Does fact #4 contradict facts #2 and #3?
    Quote Originally Posted by Antóin Mac Comháin View Post

    Welsh Labour Academic states the case for Welsh Independence - Political Irish

    Should Carwyn Jones and Leanne Wood prepare for a new era of cooperation - and even an independence referendum?

    Labour-supporting Welsh academic Huw Williams makes the case for radical cooperation

    The lecturer in political philosophy argues that the future of the Wales he loves is at stake and Labour must ‘think fast’.

    Here is his argument for why Welsh Labour should consider a new partnership with Plaid Cymru:

    The prospect of a Tory majority in Wales, years deep into a time of austerity, may dumbfound us – yet it should not be altogether surprising.

    We might view it as the sudden dénouement of a gradual decline since the highs of 1997: a conclusion by some of the faithful in Wales that a strong British Labour party did not usher in the transformational change required to ward off their relative deprivation, and that our Assembly can only apply a little ointment to the searing cuts of Tory austerity.

    An impoverished and weakened Wales is no more likely to yield a resurgent independent Wales than it is to fulfil the socialist dreams of the hard left. Rather than push people into a reaction, a regressive government is as likely to disempower them.

    This could be 'the beginning of the end' for Wales

    A future reminiscent of the Tudor state of yore is therefore an equal possibility, a vision that echoes in the voice of those who speak of Brexit’s liberation. We must face up to the possibility that this may be the beginning of the end – and that this land, in time, will be inhabited by the empty carapace of a people known as the Welsh, with their spirit dissipated far and wide, and sunken into the land that sustained them for so long.

    The dangers of laying ourselves prostrate in front of Theresa May and her band of Dic Sion Dafydds are clear enough to many.

    As much as we must hate to admit it ‘voting Labour’ is not ‘the only way to remove Theresa May’ – although it remains of course the key plank in any such strategy, and for defending Wales against the blue tide. And for those who put party over people, of course, Labour’s entrails will disappear with them.

    We must think again, and we must think fast, because we will aid and abet a dangerous Labour defeat for Wales and beyond if we continue as we are. We cannot be sure that we will live to fight another day; failure in the General Election and the establishment of new voting patterns will inevitably lead to decline in the Assembly, leaving the way clear for an emboldened Tory party with the British establishment at its behest.

    Should we think for one moment that this is a blip from which we must surely recover we need only look at the collapse in Scotland.

    Gwynn Alf Williams, the Marxist historian, would lament the failed referendum of 1979 and the Labour collapse of 1983, but he also spoke of our capacity for recreating ourselves. This capacity continues to lie within us; for a little longer at least.

    Our leader Carwyn has the choice of seeing us through another referendum and one more historic act of recreation, to set himself forever in the pantheon of Welsh heroes. His other choice is to allow apathy, confusion and desolation to rein, and to be remembered as the leader who allowed the Wales we know and love to slip from our grasp.

    You count Tory votes in Cornwall, Scotland and Wales. I count Celtic Nationalist votes in Cornwall, Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

    We will never know how many seats Labour could have gained at the next UK General Election, if they had made a pre-election pact with Plaid Cymru, SF, the SNP and Mebyon Kernow, to call on their supporters and the Celtic Diaspora living in England to vote Labour, with the majority Nationalist or Labour candidate being given a free run against the Tories and the Unionists in the Celtic Nations, but we will be able to measure if it was possible for Labour candidates to win seats in Cornwall, and indeed, for Nationalists to win seats in the Six Counties, Wales and Scotland.




    SNP claim victory in Scotland, with second best result in history - Political Irish

    The SNP has won the general election in Scotland. The Tories have lost their majority at Westminster.

    Here’s what you need to know.

    The SNP won the election in Scotland.

    The SNP won 35 seats, but lost a number of seats and excellent parliamentarians. Alex Salmond and Angus Robertson will be a massive loss.

    Yet the SNP still won more seats than all the other parties combined, and won the largest number of votes in Scotland.

    This is the second best Westminster result ever for the SNP. Before 2015, the largest number of SNP MPs was 11. Going into the election two years ago, we had just 6.

    The Tories lost the election in Scotland and lost their majority in the UK.

    The SNP has more than double the number of Scottish seats than the Tories. Across Scotland, the Tories have been heavily defeated, winning just one in seven seats.

    And in the UK, they asked for a massive majority that would crush the opposition. Instead they lost their majority and are likely to lose their leader.

    Instead of strength and stability, the Tories now seem headed for an extended period of infighting, with Brexit negotiations set to begin in just 10 days.

    Scottish Labour Party encouraged Tory win

    Kezia Dugdale used television interviews to urge the public to vote tactically to stop the SNP. This undermined Jeremy Corbyn’s chances of winning the UK election. Without the 12 Tory gains from the SNP, Labour and the SNP combined would have had more seats than the Tories. There were even reports suggesting that Scottish Labour and the Tories were working together.

    SNP MPs elected today will make sure Scotland has a strong voice at Westminster.

    Both the Scottish and UK results show a massive rejection of the Tories extreme Brexit. This result – combined with the hung Parliament – makes Scotland pivotal at Westminster.

    We will use this influence to defend our place in the Single Market and the 80,000 jobs that depend on it. We’ll make sure Scotland’s voice is heard in the Brexit negotiations, and we will continue to stand up for Scotland’s industries, including fisheries and agriculture.

    We will work to keep the Tories out of power.

    We will form the third largest party in the Commons and have an opportunity to have real influence in the future of the United Kingdom. We will seek to deliver key commitments we share with other progressive parties such as: an end to austerity, increased investment in public services, including the NHS, fair pensions for older people by maintaining the triple lock; and making sure work pays with a rise in the Minimum Wage.

    And SNP MPs will fight to avoid the calamity of an extreme hard Brexit. The SNP (@theSNP) • Twitter


    Mebyon Kernow, the Party for Cornwall, condemn the Government snap election - Political Irish

    Mebyon Kernow will not be standing in the General Election

    MK has today issued the following statement:

    It is with regret that Mebyon Kernow – the Party for Cornwall will not be putting forward any candidates for the 2017 General Election, which will take place on 8th June.

    Over the past few months, the UK Prime Minister made numerous assertions that there would be no snap General Election. She also repeatedly stated that the next General Election would take place in 2020, as specified by the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act.

    As a consequence, Mebyon Kernow has not been making preparations for parliamentary elections and, in 2017, we have focused our efforts on the elections to the unitary authority and town and parish councils across Cornwall.

    Our members consider that the Prime Minister and other Westminster politicians have shamefully misled voters on this matter and are extremely angry at the disrespectful way in which the General Election was announced during local elections.

    We can also confirm that Mebyon Kernow will not be formally endorsing candidates from other political parties, but throughout the General Election period we will be actively lobbying would-be MPs and holding them to account on those issues which are important to the members of our Party and to the people of Cornwall. - Party for Cornwall (@MebyonKernow) | Twitter


    'It's the Tamar, not the Amazon' - Cornish Nationalism goes from strength to strength Cornish national consciousness gets stronger by the year - Political Irish

    Its political parties may not have enjoyed electoral gains, but that doesn’t mean they’re a failure

    The Cornish nationalist party Mebyon Kernow (‘sons of Cornwall’) is not contesting any seats in the general election. Its leader of 20 years, Dick Cole, said its members were ‘exhausted’ after their local election campaign — it retained four councillors at ‘County Hall’ (Cornish nationalists always put County Hall in inverted commas, to avoid the inference that the Duchy is a mere county), and were only six votes shy of getting as many seats as Labour. It did not have the resources to fight an election so soon after 2015, when all its candidates lost their deposits.

    You might find it less surprising to learn that Mebyon Kernow is not standing than that Cornwall has its own party at all. It is true that the area has a distinct identity: its borders are older than those of any country in western Europe — but that is true of a lot of English counties. The Cornish are, to be sure, more protective of theirs: when the Boundary Commission proposed a new constituency straddling the Devon/Cornwall border, Cole led protests against this attack on its ‘territorial integrity’. Mebyon Kernow has always shunned violence — to the possible disappointment of one of its earliest members, Daphne du Maurier, who wrote that she quite fancied ‘blowing up bridges’ — but it is striking that Cole should use language that would justify the declaration of war. David Cameron’s flippant remark — ‘It’s the Tamar, not the Amazon, for heaven’s sake’ — was widely reported, and the former prime minister is loathed in much of the Duchy as a consequence.

    Mebyon Kernow think of the Tamar as a national border. There is something in this: the Anglo-Saxons never got as far as Cornwall, leaving it to the original Celtic inhabitants, and as late as the Tudor period, the Cornish were thought of as one of the four nations of Britain, along with the Welsh, Scots and English, each speaking their own language. That changed after the Reformation: the new translations of the liturgy were strongly resisted in Cornwall — for Cornish speakers, English was as foreign as Latin, if not more so — but when the Prayer Book Rebellion failed, and the leading Cornish speakers were executed (separatists call it ‘a forgotten genocide’), the Cornish language declined, and with it the idea of Cornwall as a distinct nation.

    However, the feeling that the Church of England was an alien imposition later helped Methodism to flourish; consequently the Liberal party — once the political wing of the dissenting chapel — was strong enough to survive through the 20th century. There was a brief wobble during the coalition — in 2012, one Liberal Democrat councillor resigned rather than belong to a party that implicitly supported George Osborne’s ‘insult to the Cornish’, the pasty tax — but even today, most Cornish constituencies are Conservative/Lib-Dem marginals; a Labour canvasser I met in Penzance urged me to vote for Andrew George, the Liberal Democrat candidate. George, the first MP to take his oath of office in Cornish, was a member of Mebyon Kernow in his youth, and that is perhaps the perfect illustration of the distinctiveness of Cornish politics: if you are an ambitious young man who doesn’t want to sacrifice his political career to an unelectable fringe party, you join the Lib Dems.

    Despite the lack of electoral success, it would be a mistake to say that Mebyon Kernow is a political failure. As part of a movement to increase Cornish national consciousness, it is a growing success. One of the forms Cornwall Council sent me when I moved here had a section on ethnic origin: the first tick box was for ‘Cornish’. In surveys about national identity, half the population describe themselves as ‘Cornish, not English’, and a further quarter as ‘More Cornish than English’. The Cornish standard, the Flag of St Piran — a white cross on a black background — was a Mebyon Kernow symbol in the 1960s, but is now seen everywhere: on flagpoles, bumper stickers, company logos, and in supermarket ‘Sourced in Cornwall’ sections; on the discreet lapel badge of the shop assistant in Currys, as well as in the tattoo on his arm. When Jeremy Corbyn proposed bank holidays for Saints George, David and Andrew, but not Piran, it caused outrage.

    While it is true that use of the Cornish language is still eccentric — Kernewek fellowship stalls at every big event in Cornwall seem to be entirely staffed by little old men with little white beards who look like Catweazle — it appears on all new road signs, largely because of a Mebyon Kernow campaign. Loveday Jenkin, the deputy leader, brought up her children to be the first in 200 years speaking Cornish as a first language.

    Mebyon Kernow’s decision not to fight this election thus seems out of step with other parties of the Celtic fringe, for whom a distinct culture and political identity are grounds for resisting the vote for Brexit. But then again, Cornwall voted overwhelmingly for Leave. - Party for Cornwall (@MebyonKernow) • Twitter


    Cornwall, N. Ireland, Scotland & Wales

    Cornish Conservatives - 6

    DUP – 10
    SF - 7
    Independent Unionist – 1

    Scottish National Party - 35
    Scottish Conservatives - 13
    Scottish Labour - 7
    Scottish Liberals - 4

    Welsh Labour - 28
    Welsh Conservatives - 8
    Plaid Cymru – 4









    Cornwall

    St Ives

    • Derek Thomas, Conservative: 22,120 votes
    • Andrew George, Liberal Democrats: 21,808
    • Chris Drew, Labour: 7,298

    Camborne Redruth and Hayle

    • George Eustice, Conservative: 23,001
    • Graham Winter, Labour: 21,424
    • Geoff Williams, Liberal Democrats: 2,979
    • Geoff Garbett, Green: 1,052

    Truro and Falmouth

    • Sarah Newton, Conservative: 25,123
    • Jayne Kirkham, Labour: 21,331
    • Rob Nolan, Liberal Democrats: 8,465
    • Duncan Odgers, UKIP: 897
    • Amanda Pennington, Green: 831

    St Austell and Newquay

    • Steve Double, Conservative: 26,856
    • Kevin Neil, Labour: 15,714
    • Stephen Gilbert, Liberal Democrat: 11,642

    North Cornwall

    • Scott Mann, Conservative: 25,835
    • Dan Rogerson, Liberal Democrat: 18,635
    • Joy Bassett, Labour: 6,151
    • John Allman (CPA) 185
    • Robert Hawkins, Socialist Labour: 138

    South East Cornwall

    • Sheryll Murray, Conservative: 29,493
    • Gareth Derrick, Labour: 12,050
    • Phil Hutty, Liberal Democrat: 10,376
    • Martin Corney, Green: 1,335

    A Cornish Election-Pact between Mebyon Kernow, the Liberal Democrats and Labour could have returned Mebyon Kernow, St Ives, Camborne Redruth and Hayle, Labour, Truro and Falmouth, Labour, St Austell and Newquay, Liberal Democrats, based on the strength of the 12,000 European votes they received, which would have left the Tories with one safe seat in South Cornwall, and 600 votes over the line in north Cornwall. Cornwall had three of the last four seats in the country to be declared but by 9.45am all six constituencies had returned the Conservative candidate.The closest-fought contest was in the St Ives constituency, where Derek Thomas kept his seat by just 312 votes, ahead of Andrew George, the first MP to take his oath of office in Cornish, who was a member of Mebyon Kernow in his youth.

    ‘Kezia Dugdale used television interviews to urge the public to vote tactically to stop the SNP. This undermined Jeremy Corbyn’s chances of winning the UK election. Without the 12 Tory gains from the SNP, Labour and the SNP combined would have had more seats than the Tories. There were even reports suggesting that Scottish Labour and the Tories were working together.’

    Between Cornwall and Scotland, Labour handed the Tories between 12-16 seats, and thus, alongside the DUP, who already have the advantage of the unionist veto, an ill-deserved victory. The failure of Labour means Carwyn Jones will be remembered as the leader who won in Wales, but lost in Westminster, Kazie Dugdale will be remembered as the Labour leader who backed the Tories, and Cornish George will be remembered as the Mebyon Kernow TD that could have been.

    There was 123 seats in the Celtic Nations, so in theory, 62 seats would give Mebyon Kernow, SF, the SNP and Plaid Cymru a Democratic Nationalist majority. The 16 seats the Liberal Labour Lattés handed the Tories would have secured that majority, and if the Manx Nationalist Party, Mec Vannin, were added to the Nationalist ticket, that voting bloc could expand further if Pro-Independence and Nationalist candidates stood in each and every constituency at the same election, preferably local, to maximize the potential of the Celtic Nationalist mandate.

    Nobody is talking about the obliteration of the Unionist Alliance Party, the British UKIP, the Welsh Liberal Democrats, the British-Labour SDLP or the British UUP? The Liberal Democratic vote in Cornwall, has Mebyon Kernows name written all over it, just like the SDLP vote in the Six Counties had SF’s name written all over it, and just like the Anti-Austerity Alliance vote, the Irish National Party vote, and the Socialist Party vote has the name of the Irish National Socialist Party & the Real Anti-Austerity Alliance written all over it. -
    Last edited by Antóin Mac Comháin; 10th June 2017 at 07:01 AM.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  10. #1040
    rainmaker rainmaker is offline
    rainmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    16,599

    Quote Originally Posted by Antóin Mac Comháin View Post
    The Liberal Democratic vote in Cornwall, has Mebyon Kernows name written all over it
    No, it doesn't. That is you framing something in order to see what you want to see. A vote for the Libedems is a vote for the Libdems. As evidenced by all the times MK have stood against the Libdems & lost with 1% of the vote.

    Cornwall voted Conservative & MK will never be able to go from 1% to defeating them.

    The rest of your post is simply pasted stuff from party websites & should be dismissed as spin. It was a bad night for the SNP. They lost a third of their seats including their former leader and their parliamentary leader. Even after Brexit.

    Alex Salmond, former leader, deliverer of the indy referendum & the second most senior figure in the party has just lost his seat to a Conservative. Think about that for a moment - Scottish independence has past its high water mark.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

Sign in to CommentRegister to Comment