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  1. #1
    Clanrickard Clanrickard is offline
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    Chinese repression in Xinjiang

    Xianjiang is a vast province home to about 10 million of the Uighur people. Ethnically different to the Han Chinese and Muslim. The Economist article................ https://www.economist.com/briefing/2...31.......lists the shocking human rights abuses that take place to keep a lid on Uighur discontent. Of the 10 million Uighurs anything between 500,000 and 1 million are in "re-education" camps. Spyware on mobile on mobile phones is obligatory. Intrusive officials entering people's homes is routine. The article is worth a read but what is shocking is the near total silence from anyone about this. Being Muslim it is easy to paint Uighurs as in league with Al Qaeda and other Islamic terror outfits and I suppose there is a buck to be made in staying stum when the Chinese are involved. I get the feeling this cannot end well.
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  2. #2
    WTTR WTTR is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clanrickard View Post
    Xianjiang is a vast province home to about 10 million of the Uighur people. Ethnically different to the Han Chinese and Muslim. The Economist article................ https://www.economist.com/briefing/2...31.......lists the shocking human rights abuses that take place to keep a lid on Uighur discontent. Of the 10 million Uighurs anything between 500,000 and 1 million are in "re-education" camps. Spyware on mobile on mobile phones is obligatory. Intrusive officials entering people's homes is routine. The article is worth a read but what is shocking is the near total silence from anyone about this. Being Muslim it is easy to paint Uighurs as in league with Al Qaeda and other Islamic terror outfits and I suppose there is a buck to be made in staying stum when the Chinese are involved. I get the feeling this cannot end well.
    Sadly, I could not access your link, as I have reached my quota of read articles.

    But believe it or not

    I met a Uighur in Toronto!


    And

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  3. #3
    DexterGreen22 DexterGreen22 is offline

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    Good OP.
    Only two responses (including this one) since one'clock this afternoon.

    Imagine the reaction/comments if it were Israel treating Palestinians in such a manner....
    Or Trump treating African-Americans in such a manner....

    No calls to stop Xi Jinping from visiting European countries like there are with Trump?
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  4. #4
    Mick Mac Mick Mac is offline

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    The uighur are a special people but they dark side of their struggle is the racist element.

    Xinjiang has become.much more culturally diverse in the last few decades and it's bred resentment and bitterness.

    The uighur cause is tainted by this ethno nationalist streak.

    https://www.ft.com/content/5e465118-...1-e6e4767162cc
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  5. #5
    recedite recedite is offline

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    From your link...
    The Chinese government argues that harsh measures are needed to prevent violence associated with Uighur separatism. In 2013 a Uighur suicide-driver crashed his car into pedestrians in Tiananmen Square in Beijing. In 2014 a knife-wielding Uighur gang slaughtered 31 travellers at a train station in Kunming, Yunnan province, an incident some in China compared to the September 11th 2001 attacks on America. Unrest in Yarkand later that year led to a hundred deaths; an attack at a coal mine in Aksu killed 50 people. Kyrgyzstani authorities blamed Uighur terrorists for an attempt to blow up the Chinese embassy in Bishkek; Uighurs have been blamed for a bombing which killed 20 at a shrine in Bangkok popular with Chinese tourists.

    There are worrying links, as the Chinese authorities are keen to point out, between Uighur separatism and global jihad, especially in the Uighur diaspora, which is based in Turkey. Chinese and Syrian officials say 1,500 Uighurs have fought with Islamic State (IS) or Jabhat al-Nusra (part of al-Qaeda) in Syria. A group called the Turkestan Islamic Party, which demands independence for Xinjiang, is banned under anti-terrorist laws in America and Europe. In 2016 a defector from IS provided a list of foreign recruits; 114 came from Xinjiang
    .

    So yes there is always an issue with Islam. Islam does not integrate well into a secular state. It will continue to brood and cause trouble until the day it can become the state. Sharia law is its aim.
    Your point is that the Chinese state is over reacting to this issue. Compared to some other countries it is, but then when you look at Belgium and the UK you have to conclude that the policies of those countries has failed. The Chinese way of dealing with intractable problems is to steamroll over them. Its crude, but it works.

    BTW if you look at a gathering of Chinese party officials in the Great Hall, its notable how many of them are wearing ethnic costumes. The Chinese state has no problem with its numerous ethnic minorities, as long as they co-operate with the state instead of opposing it.
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  6. #6
    The Field Marshal The Field Marshal is offline
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    Is Uigher Chinese for Ogre?
    Just asking.
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  7. #7
    Dame_Enda Dame_Enda is offline
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    It has only been part of China since the 1700s - far shorter than us being part of the British empire. So by that standard it has an argument for independence. It is only an accident of history that Mongolia gained independence but Tibet and Xinjiang (originally East Turkestan) we're reconquered after initially throwing out the Chinese army during the 1912 revolution. Mongolia was saved by the Soviet occupation and before that by civil war in China.
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  8. #8
    Ardillaun Ardillaun is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Mac View Post
    The uighur are a special people but they dark side of their struggle is the racist element.

    Xinjiang has become.much more culturally diverse in the last few decades and it's bred resentment and bitterness.

    The uighur cause is tainted by this ethno nationalist streak.

    https://www.ft.com/content/5e465118-...1-e6e4767162cc
    How tainted do you think Han China is then? The Uighurs are in their own land so ethno-nationalism would be appropriate.

    The Chinese are pursuing a form of Manifest Destiny in their Wild West. Of course, any criticism of Han depredations by North Americans or persons of the British persuasion should start with a few contrite admissions. Colonialism in our own time looks so ugly, doesn't it?
    Last edited by Ardillaun; 2nd June 2018 at 05:25 AM.
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  9. #9
    Analyzer Analyzer is offline
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    Trust the E-con-artist, as a magazine that is political and not economically oriented to push a political line.

    For economics, I recommend just about anything but the comic that calls itself the Economist. It's economics predictions are sh!te.

    The Uigyers ARE radicalized. And one of the main instigators is Ankara. This has been documented in the Asian Times for over a decade.

    The Chinese authorities are tackling an "intifada" type movement, and seeking to control it, in a manner that is very blunt, but highly effective and preventing terrorism.

    And that is the one thing that the political magazine calls the "economist" detests the most - an effective campaign against the terrorism that is aligned with Gulf petromonarchy delusions.

    The Chinese authorities are correct, but that will not stop the econ-artist magazine from moral posturing, and insinuating that there is a problem with a regime that the econ-artist opposes.
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  10. #10
    Analyzer Analyzer is offline
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    A very good way to display one's aversion to obejectivity, and love of being misinformed it to announce to the world that one reads the Economist magazine.

    It's very name is a lie. It is not an economically oriented magazine. It is a political magazine.
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