Register to Comment
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 46
Like Tree48Likes
  1. #1
    Casablanca Casablanca is offline
    Casablanca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6,389

    Ronan Farrow & The Challenge of "Investigative Journalism"

    Ronan Farrow is an investigative journalist with NBC's Today Show, heading up a segment in that show called Undercover with Ronan Farrow.

    Farrow (see Wiki bio linked) has led, for a 29 year old, a busy life. A lawyer by trade, having graduated from Yale, he has worked for the UN and as a special advisor to Hillary Clinton. His mother is Mia Farrow and there is some ambiguity (based on his mother's, the Sinatra Family's and his own statements on the issue) as to whether his father is Woody Allen or Frank Sinatra.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronan_Farrow

    Farrow recently brought a story to NBC concerning a Media Tycoon and his alleged sexual assaults on a number of actresses over along period. NBC didn't broadcast the story, which Farrow then took to the New Yorker which ran the story. You may be familiar with the fallout which is covered on all international media, including the playing of tapes on RTE today.

    My focus is on the failure of NBC to carry the story and it's then take up by The New Yorker, and the questions it raises:

    Is there still a role, in the internet age, for old fashioned investigative reporting?
    What influences a particular new organisation to run a story, or not?
    Are there particular forces at play in organisations when the subject of the story is a high profile one?
    Last edited by Casablanca; 12th October 2017 at 02:45 PM.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  2. #2
    Casablanca Casablanca is offline
    Casablanca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6,389

    There's more on the way in which the Farrow story was dropped by NBC here:

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/how-nb...instein-expose
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  3. #3
    mr_anderson mr_anderson is offline
    mr_anderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    9,029

    Quote Originally Posted by Casablanca View Post
    Farrow recently brought a story to NBC concerning a Media Tycoon and his alleged sexual assaults on a number of actresses over along period. NBC didn't broadcast the story, which Farrow then took to the New Yorker which ran the story. You may be familiar with the fallout which is covered on all international media, including the playing of tapes on RTE today.

    My focus is on the failure of NBC to carry the story and it's then take up by The New Yorker, and the questions it raises:

    Is there still a role, in the internet age, for old fashioned investigative reporting?
    What influence a particular new organisation to run a story, or not?
    Are there particular forces at play in organisations when the subject of the story is a high profile one?

    As traditional media declines, falling viewership results in falling advertising revenue.
    Consequently, large advertisers now have immense clout when it comes to dictating editorial power.

    In the past, investigative reporters were afraid of getting their story wrong.
    Now they also run huge risks when getting their story right.

    I can immediately recall one incident of an Irish journalist getting the boot after penning a (mildly unflattering, but truthful) piece relating to a significant advertiser.
    Ironically of course, but thanks to the Streisand Effect, the article would have been quickly forgotten were it not for the after-effects.

    The situation in the Irish media is even worse because of our libel laws.
    Ask any experienced journalist about stories they cannot print. There's a long list.

    Our country badly needs a US-style 1st amendment in the constitution.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  4. #4
    gracethepirate gracethepirate is offline
    gracethepirate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    15,002

    A very pertinent comedic corollary to this instance of investigative journalism:
    https://www.thedailybeast.com/samant...r-dick-is-ugly

    Comedy is often essential to get the message across.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  5. #5
    Casablanca Casablanca is offline
    Casablanca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6,389

    Quote Originally Posted by mr_anderson View Post
    As traditional media declines, falling viewership results in falling advertising revenue.
    Consequently, large advertisers now have immense clout when it comes to dictating editorial power.

    In the past, investigative reporters were afraid of getting their story wrong.
    Now they also run huge risks when getting their story right.


    I can immediately recall one incident of an Irish journalist getting the boot after penning a (mildly unflattering, but truthful) piece relating to a significant advertiser.
    Ironically of course, but thanks to the Streisand Effect, the article would have been quickly forgotten were it not for the after-effects.

    The situation in the Irish media is even worse because of our libel laws.
    Ask any experienced journalist about stories they cannot print. There's a long list.

    Our country badly needs a US-style 1st amendment in the constitution.
    I think the bolded part above is very true.

    What's the Streisand Effect?
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  6. #6
    mr_anderson mr_anderson is offline
    mr_anderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    9,029

    Quote Originally Posted by Casablanca View Post
    I think the bolded part above is very true.

    What's the Streisand Effect?

    It is named after American entertainer Barbra Streisand, whose 2003 attempt to suppress photographs of her residence in Malibu, California inadvertently drew further public attention to it.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streisand_effect

    Essentially, the very act of trying to hush something up, draws even more attention to it.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  7. #7
    artfoley56 artfoley56 is offline
    artfoley56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    8,147

    Quote Originally Posted by Casablanca View Post

    What's the Streisand Effect?
    babs doesn't want you to see this pic



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streisand_effect
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  8. #8
    Casablanca Casablanca is offline
    Casablanca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6,389

    Quote Originally Posted by mr_anderson View Post
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streisand_effect

    Essentially, the very act of trying to hush something up, draws even more attention to it.
    I see, thank you.

    Doesn't that then raise further questions over the NBC position. If they knew, that by dropping the story themselves, that somebody else would run with it ( and it isn't as if Farrow wouldn't have lots of medial/political contacts), why did they walk away from it?
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  9. #9
    artfoley56 artfoley56 is offline
    artfoley56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    8,147

    Quote Originally Posted by Casablanca View Post
    I see, thank you.

    Doesn't that then raise further questions over the NBC position. If they knew, that by dropping the story themselves, that somebody else would run with it ( and it isn't as if Farrow wouldn't have lots of medial/political contacts), why did they walk away from it?
    prob thought wienstein would spike it anywhere else it went
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  10. #10
    mr_anderson mr_anderson is offline
    mr_anderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    9,029

    Quote Originally Posted by Casablanca View Post
    I see, thank you.

    Doesn't that then raise further questions over the NBC position. If they knew, that by dropping the story themselves, that somebody else would run with it ( and it isn't as if Farrow wouldn't have lots of medial/political contacts), why did they walk away from it?
    Yes and no.
    This isn't the first paedo story to emerge from Hollywood.
    Indeed, most fail to gain traction.
    So the success of this story was not certain by any measure.
    It required major balls to publish.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Sign in to CommentRegister to Comment