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  1. #21
    Volatire Volatire is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by A Voice View Post
    Yeah, there was groupthink around London that kicking "Mick" off his land was a great idea. Maybe nobody pointed out how "stupid" that was.
    A classic Malthusian population bubble followed by collapse which was always going to happen sooner or later.



    It wasn't the Brits fault that the population exploded in the pre-famine years.

    It was Mick's.
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  2. #22
    blinding blinding is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by A Voice View Post
    Anyway they were only Catholics.
    Bonus Points .
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  3. #23
    A Voice A Voice is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volatire View Post
    A classic Malthusian population bubble followed by collapse which was always going to happen sooner or later.



    It wasn't the Brits fault that the population exploded in the pre-famine years.

    It was Mick's.


    Oh, look: no population crash!

    Now, lets get back to those 1.5 acres. And the response to the famine, shall we?
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  4. #24
    Fr. Hank Tree Fr. Hank Tree is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcos the black View Post
    It was about 170 years ago.
    While I agree it's good to discuss it from a historical perspective I still see people using it for modern day biases. From a physiological point of view I think we as a country "need to get over it".
    Quote Originally Posted by Marcos the black View Post
    Study yes, emotion and blame?
    Generally speaking, you think there is something wrong with becoming emotional about history and seeking to attribute blame?
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  5. #25
    Se0samh Se0samh is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcos the black View Post
    It was about 170 years ago.
    While I agree it's good to discuss it from a historical perspective I still see people using it for modern day biases. From a physiological point of view I think we as a country "need to get over it".

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  6. #26
    between the bridges between the bridges is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by A Voice View Post
    Anyway they were only Catholics.
    it is less well known that the famine also afflicted many Protestants by death and large scale emigration.

    In one week in February 1847 the Lurgan workhouse situated in one of the most dynamic linen production centres of the Province witnessed 95 deaths. Its mortality figures in 1847 were amongst the worst in Ireland.


    Many Ulster Protestants also died in the Irish potato famine of the 1840s - Belfast Newsletter
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  7. #27
    Fr. Hank Tree Fr. Hank Tree is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Se0samh View Post
    Maybe he meant psychological?
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  8. #28
    Dame_Enda Dame_Enda is online now
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    As a fan of that show "Victoria", I thought the episode captured well the religious bigotry that influenced government policy at the time. Lord John Russell and Charles Trevelyan were the real villains of the Famine but Russell wasn't in this episode. I wonder will they show her visit to Ireland in 1848 where she was shielded from the reality of the death and dispossession.

    A little known contributor to the mass evictions was the Gregory Amendment, devised by William Gregory MP. This banned holders of an acre of land or more from receiving famine assistance. As the landlords themselves were supposed to pay for the relief, there was a clear conflict of interest, and many tenants were evicted in order to get them below the one acre-threshold, which meant the landlords didn't have to pay assistance for them.
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  9. #29
    A Voice A Voice is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by between the bridges View Post
    it is less well known that the famine also afflicted many Protestants by death and large scale emigration.

    In one week in February 1847 the Lurgan workhouse – situated in one of the most dynamic linen production centres of the Province – witnessed 95 deaths. Its mortality figures in 1847 were amongst the worst in Ireland.


    Many Ulster Protestants also died in the Irish potato famine of the 1840s - Belfast Newsletter
    Collateral damage, as far as London groupthink was concerned.

    If there were enough Protestants in Ireland for the British imperialists, the famine would never have happened and had it happened, it would have been alleviated pronto. Your tough you didn't plant a bit better by then.
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  10. #30
    Supra Supra is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcos the black View Post
    It was about 170 years ago.
    While I agree it's good to discuss it from a historical perspective I still see people using it for modern day biases. From a physiological point of view I think we as a country "need to get over it".
    Agreed. Also, the recorded history needs corrected and accepted
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