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  1. #1
    bobbysands81 bobbysands81 is offline

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    Lord Trevelyan believed that God sent the "Famine"

    to kill the people of Ireland and it was God's will that people died.

    It was on The Last Word today, even a relative of Trevelyan who has written a book on her family was not able to portray him in a good light.
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  2. #2
    Mise_Eire Mise_Eire is offline

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    Re: Lord Trevelyan believed that God sent the "Famine&q

    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysands81
    to kill the people of Ireland and it was God's will that people died.
    What was unusual about that in the 19th century ? A lot of people thought that things like famines and Floods were God's will and God's Judgement - quite a few still do. RC Clergy also told people the famine was God's punishment.
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  3. #3
    bobbysands81 bobbysands81 is offline

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    Re: Lord Trevelyan believed that God sent the "Famine&a

    Quote Originally Posted by Mise_Eire
    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysands81
    to kill the people of Ireland and it was God's will that people died.
    What was unusual about that in the 19th century ? A lot of people thought that things like famines and Floods were God's will and God's Judgement - quite a few still do. RC Clergy also told people the famine was God's punishment.
    You're right absolutely nothing at all wrong with the man charged to administer food to a decimated country believing that he is going against God's will by stopping their suffering.
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  4. #4
    Cael Cael is offline

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    In the British imperial mind, God's will and imperial wishes were one and the same thing. As has been shown on the "Irish Famine Commemoration" thread, the series of twenty nine famines between 1720 and 1880 constitute genocide as defined by the 1948 Genocide Convention and the Rome Statutes of the International Criminal Court.
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  5. #5
    stringjack stringjack is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysands81
    Nothing at all wrong with the man employed to administer food to a decimated country believes that he is going against God's will by stopping their suffering.
    For the sake of precision, it doesn't follow from the fact that one believes a famine to be an act of God that one must also believe that intervening to counteract the effects of the famine would constitute 'going against God's will'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cael
    As has been shown on the "Irish Famine Commemoration" thread, the series of twenty nine famines between 1720 and 1880 constitute genocide as defined by the 1948 Genocide Convention and the Rome Statutes of the International Criminal Court.
    Nothing of the sort has been shown.
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  6. #6
    Mise_Eire Mise_Eire is offline

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    Re: Lord Trevelyan believed that God sent the "Famine&a

    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysands81
    Quote Originally Posted by Mise_Eire
    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysands81
    to kill the people of Ireland and it was God's will that people died.
    What was unusual about that in the 19th century ? A lot of people thought that things like famines and Floods were God's will and God's Judgement - quite a few still do. RC Clergy also told people the famine was God's punishment.
    Nothing at all wrong with the man employed to administer food to a decimated country believes that he is going against God's will by stopping their suffering.
    That's quite some leap .... but to be expected from a Plastic MOPEr


    Mother Theresa believed that the suffering of the poor in India was God's will.....
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  7. #7
    Cael Cael is offline

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    A post from the "Irish Famine Commoration Thread" which includes Trevelyan's genocidal intent towards the Gaelic population of Ireland:


    Not only the poor of Ireland were dependent on the potato. The Times editorial of September 30, 1845, warned; "In England the two main meals of a working man's day now consists of potatoes." England's potato-dependence was as excessive as Ireland's. Grossly over-populated relative to its food supply, England faced famine unless it could import vast amounts of alternative food. But it didn't take merely Ireland's surplus food; or enough Irish food to save England. It took more; for profit and to exterminate the people of Ireland. Queen Victoria's economist, Nassau Senior, expressed his fear that existing policies "will not kill more than one million Irish in 1848 and that will scarcely be enough to do much good." When an eye-witness urged a stop to the genocide-in-progress, Trevelyan replied: "We must not complain of what we really want to obtain." Trevelyan insisted that all reports of starvation were exaggerated, until 1847. He then declared it ended and refused entry to the American food relief ship Sorciére. Thomas Carlyle; influential British essayist, wrote; "Ireland is like a half-starved rat that crosses the path of an elephant. What must the elephant do? Squelch it - by heavens - squelch it." "Total Annihilation;" suggested The Times leader of September 2, 1846; and in 1848 its editorialists crowed "A Celt will soon be as rare on the banks of the Shannon as the red man on the banks of Manhattan."
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  8. #8
    Cael Cael is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by stringjack
    For the sake of precision, it doesn't follow from the fact that one believes a famine to be an act of God that one must also believe that intervening to counteract the effects of the famine would constitute 'going against God's will'.
    Im afraid Stringjack, this is the kind of faulty logic you have been using on the Irish Famine Commemoration thread when you tried to show that buying a CD was a genocidal act under the Genocide Convention. If the famine was an act of God's will, then, obviously, trying to stop the famine was trying to undo an act of God and going against his will.
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  9. #9
    bobbysands81 bobbysands81 is offline

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    Re: Lord Trevelyan believed that God sent the "Famine&a

    [quote=Mise_Eire]
    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysands81
    Quote Originally Posted by "Mise_Eire":3d2y9ida
    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysands81
    to kill the people of Ireland and it was God's will that people died.
    What was unusual about that in the 19th century ? A lot of people thought that things like famines and Floods were God's will and God's Judgement - quite a few still do. RC Clergy also told people the famine was God's punishment.
    Nothing at all wrong with the man employed to administer food to a decimated country believes that he is going against God's will by stopping their suffering.
    That's quite some leap .... but to be expected from a Plastic MOPEr


    Mother Theresa believed that the suffering of the poor in India was God's will.....[/quote:3d2y9ida]

    Insult after insult.

    Can you not debate without insulting?
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  10. #10
    bobbysands81 bobbysands81 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by stringjack
    Quote Originally Posted by bobbysands81
    Nothing at all wrong with the man employed to administer food to a decimated country believes that he is going against God's will by stopping their suffering.
    For the sake of precision, it doesn't follow from the fact that one believes a famine to be an act of God that one must also believe that intervening to counteract the effects of the famine would constitute 'going against God's will'.
    Can you explain that logic please?

    To me it is crystal clear, if he believes that God's will is for Irish people to die then he is most definitely going against God's will to help them live and his record, and the amount of deaths, speak for themselves.
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