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  1. #11
    mercymercyme mercymercyme is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnmcgahon dundalk YFG
    At the moment the irish history LC course starts in 1870 and ends in 1949
    There is two courses in history in the leaving cert - the modern and the renaissance. The renaissance covers 1450 to about 1618. By a very wide margin most students do the modern course. Given the detail the course goes into at higher level, it would be impratical for the leaving cert to try cover a wider streach of history than the periods covered in the two courses. Our history treacher in school decided he wanted to teach the renaissance instead, probably because he was bored of doing the modern course year in year out. It was a pain at the time and a few students dopped history but in retrospect it was fairly interesting for us to do an area of history outside the more mainstream modern period. It also helped me a great deal when I went to study history in Uni, renaissance history being a mandatory subject I was at an advantage to all those who did the modern course in school. In an Irish context, the renaissance period was of seminal importance, seeing the consolidation of English power, the foundations of the problems faced by modern Ireland and the decline of the political independance of the gaelic lords.
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  2. #12
    1111952 1111952 is offline

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    Re: History Forum Rules

    I published a History of Kerry recently for the market of those who did not take History at second level schooling. The plan was to use the freedom not enjoyed by writers for the school syllabus, and to go outside of the normal canon of the accepted history. I am reminded this morning as we assess the Lisbon No vote that there is huge support out there for agenda-free news, and in the writing of History this means setting aside the narrow nationalist agenda that has dominated Irish awareness as a result of the inauguration of the Free State and later the Irish Republic, with all the trappings of republicanism, separatism and so on. These are traditions in our history, of course, but they are not the only traditions, and in a sens it might be true to say that the Home Rule and Protestant traditions were marginalised or written out of history from 1918. Moreover, the concept of Liberty predates 1798 and all that followed; we find the Confederation of Kilkenny espousing Liberty (and using the word) in the 1640s when what they meant was the freedom to practice their religion and set aside the Penal Laws; and they raised the matter of Poynings' Law, which inhibited the Irish legislature.
    Gerald O'Carroll (History of Kerry, 2007, 25 euros; [email protected])
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  3. #13
    imokyrok imokyrok is offline

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    Re: History Forum Rules

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  4. #14
    Nem Nem is offline

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    IHS rules

    I noticed that the above posts don't really set out any 'rules' for this forum despite the title of thread. IMHO they are not really needed and in the past three years there have been some very interesting and detailed discussions of various historical topics. They certainly have added to my knowledge and, on other occasions, challenged my own perception of Irish history.

    I thought it might be useful to set out a few guidelines as they are being used by Irish Historians. Note that I'm not trying to pass these of as 'rules' for this forum or anything. These are simply the rules as they are being used by Irish historians generally and throughout Irish academia. They can be found here: http://www.tcd.ie/history/ihs/pdf/rulesforcontribs.pdf

    The general gist of these is as follows:

    For a book: T. W. Moody, Davitt and Irish revolution (Oxford, 1981)

    Rule of thumb is that where capitals aren't needed, don't use them. And avoid using the name of the publisher, but the place of publication.

    When citing, use the above, but with a page number after it.

    T. W. Moody, Davitt and Irish revolution (Oxford, 1981), p. 76

    or

    T. W. Moody, Davitt and Irish revolution (Oxford, 1981), pp 78-79

    When it is a multivolume work, simply put Vol. 2 before the place of publication. The same goes for different editions (i.e. 5th edition).

    Article in a book: Ciaran Brady, ‘Comparable histories? Tudor reform in Wales and Ireland’ in Steven G. Ellis and Sarah Barber (eds), Conquest and union: fashioning a British state, 1485-1725 (London, 1995)

    Citing identical to a book. The above should also be used for an article in a magazine or periodical. Then the title of the magazine is in italics only and followed by the issue number (i.e. History Ireland Vol. 17 Issue 4 (July/August 2009). There is no need to include the place of publication.

    Documents: The correspondence of Jonathan Swift, ed. F. E. Ball (6 vols, London, 1910-14), v, 437-8.

    Rule of thumb here is to use the title first to indicate the author of the document. If the writer is unknown the name of the editor goes in in front of the title. Also note that the volume number precedes the page or folio number.

    Newspapers: Irish Times, 6 Oct. 1968.

    Note: there is no need to give the actual page as editions on the day might vary.

    Interviews: Interview with Brian O’Mahony, 10 June 1991 (B.L. National Sound Archive, National Life Story Collection, C468/10).

    Note: All in plain text.

    Internet: Ulster Historical Foundation, ‘Distribution of surnames in Ireland in 1890’ (Ulster Historical Foundation - Irish Genealogy Research Ireland, Ulster, Antrim, Down, Belfast) (2 Jan. 2003).

    Obviously, on an Internet forum such as this, a direct link to the article is preferable. However, pages change (i.e. Wiki) or are on occasion removed while the thread here remains. Using the above reference will avoid confusion when older posts are revisited. So note the date of access in the above and the use of the main URL. The above should also be used when downloading digital copies of books from, say, Project Gutenberg.

    Hope that this is of some help for some people. For further details see the .pdf file from the TCD website
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  5. #15
    hippychic hippychic is offline

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    augutus foster colonization of irish catholics

    has anyone come across this man and could they give me some direction as to where to find out more on the 1847 colonization of the Irish catholic a bill which this man signed with many others in that year

    Hippychic

    Forgive me first time to the site and a bit lost as to how to use it
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  6. #16
    Maureen Murphy 1234 Maureen Murphy 1234 is offline

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    I think this would be a good idea as when wpeaking of histiry u have to develop your position to a great extent to make valid points

    This is what makes us tick, if we do tick,

    Surely there are tow courses available/
    Last edited by Sync; 5th December 2010 at 03:33 PM.
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  7. #17
    Tom O Connor Tom O Connor is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catalpa View Post
    Well there is no doubting it's importance but at what stage would a modern secondary school student study say Ancient Irish History or would they at all?

    In my day Irish History stopped in 1921!
    Have a look at 'Ireland's Queen Maeve' on Amazon.com Kindle Store and then ask yourself that question again.

    Tom O Connor
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  8. #18
    Malcolm Redfellow Malcolm Redfellow is offline
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    I thoroughly enjoy this forum.

    Much of the debate is uplifting and enlightening.

    I don't have to agree with the posters/commenters but most contribute something special, and informative. A few are erudite and quite brilliant.

    But ... you knew that was coming ... any thread on mid-20th century history is subverted by a particular contributor whose obsession is to introduce Holocaust denial, to repost vast amounts of non-history, as approved by the CODOH types.

    When he runs out of pre-prepared posts, from his limited "knowledge", we find streams of abuse.

    Can nothing be done to restrain such stuff?
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  9. #19
    RasherHash RasherHash is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Redfellow View Post
    I thoroughly enjoy this forum.

    Much of the debate is uplifting and enlightening.

    I don't have to agree with the posters/commenters but most contribute something special, and informative. A few are erudite and quite brilliant.

    But ... you knew that was coming ... any thread on mid-20th century history is subverted by a particular contributor whose obsession is to introduce Holocaust denial, to repost vast amounts of non-history, as approved by the CODOH types.

    When he runs out of pre-prepared posts, from his limited "knowledge", we find streams of abuse.

    Can nothing be done to restrain such stuff?
    You could send him to a concentration camp or make him wear a ...white star?
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  10. #20
    RasherHash RasherHash is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Redfellow View Post
    I thoroughly enjoy this forum.

    Much of the debate is uplifting and enlightening.

    I don't have to agree with the posters/commenters but most contribute something special, and informative. A few are erudite and quite brilliant.

    But ... you knew that was coming ... any thread on mid-20th century history is subverted by a particular contributor whose obsession is to introduce Holocaust denial, to repost vast amounts of non-history, as approved by the CODOH types.

    When he runs out of pre-prepared posts, from his limited "knowledge", we find streams of abuse.

    Can nothing be done to restrain such stuff?
    The fact is the holocaust is central to any discussion of WW2. To leave it out is to deny a major aspect of the story and the fact also is that it is nearly always dragged in by someone at some stage.

    I am more often than not replying to some comment mentioning it.
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