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  1. #11
    Ferdia Ferdia is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Field Marshal View Post
    Behans description "The phukker from Mucker" sums it all up.
    Behan was a bisexual bollocks.
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  2. #12
    Ferdia Ferdia is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren J. Prior View Post
    It's something I very rarely think of but I don't think I will ever forget my first day in Honours English in 5th Year being the first person asked to read and to have to read some of Stony Grey Soil. How depressing!
    This says more about you than it does of Kavanagh.
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  3. #13
    Ardillaun Ardillaun is offline

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    Some of the kids on Haddington Rd were terrified of him as he strode along talking loudly to himself.

    The poetry often seems unfinished and has an uncompromising ugliness at times but I keep returning to it.
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  4. #14
    Morgellons Morgellons is offline
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    Something for the season that starts tomorrow. I really like this poem.

    Advent
    We have tested and tasted too much, lover –
    Through a chink too wide there comes in no wonder.
    But here in the Advent-darkened room
    Where the dry black bread and the sugarless tea
    Of penance will charm back the luxury
    Of a child’s soul, we’ll return to Doom
    The knowledge we stole but could not use.

    And the newness that was in every stale thing
    When we looked at it as children: the spirit-shocking
    Wonder in a black slanting Ulster hill
    Or the prophetic astonishment in the tedious talking
    Of an old fool will awake for us and bring
    You and me to the yard gate to watch the whins
    And the bog-holes, cart-tracks, old stables where Time begins.

    O after Christmas we’ll have no need to go searching
    For the difference that sets an old phrase burning –
    We’ll hear it in the whispered argument of a churning
    Or in the streets where the village boys are lurching.
    And we’ll hear it among decent men too
    Who barrow dung in gardens under trees,
    Wherever life pours ordinary plenty.
    Won’t we be rich, my love and I, and please
    God we shall not ask for reason’s payment,
    The why of heart-breaking strangeness in dreeping hedges
    Nor analyse God’s breath in common statement.
    We have thrown into the dust-bin the clay-minted wages
    Of pleasure, knowledge and the conscious hour –
    And Christ comes with a January flower.
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  5. #15
    Spirit Of Newgrange Spirit Of Newgrange is offline
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    Where the potato-gatherers like mechanised scarecrows move
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  6. #16
    RasherHash RasherHash is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by statsman View Post
    For a man who wrote relatively little, he's a deeply uneven poet. At his best, there's a lyric economy and particularity that has to be admired; at his worst, his work is clumsy.


    The latter:


    The former:
    I even like the bad stuff.
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  7. #17
    RasherHash RasherHash is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren J. Prior View Post
    It's something I very rarely think of but I don't think I will ever forget my first day in Honours English in 5th Year being the first person asked to read and to have to read some of Stony Grey Soil. How depressing!
    I can see when you're a young pupil forced to read you find it depressing but I can appreciate it's wonderful lyrical sentiment.

    I think it has a beauty that transends the clods and hardships, it's like he, as a person lived his life, but spiritually or philosophically he soared above the come day, go-day realities.
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  8. #18
    Nedz Newt Nedz Newt is offline
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    Tangential political connection - he wrote Raglan Road for Hilda Moriarty, later Hilda O'Malley, who married Donogh O'Malley, FF Education minister in the 60s.

    Separately, if you can get hold of Anthony Cronin's book, Dead as Doornails, it's a great read about those times.
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  9. #19
    Round tower Round tower is online now

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    Watching the news this evening how bad the grave looked, a wooden cross and a couple of stones on the grave, may be that is the way he wanted it, i would have expected a headstone and some of his poetry written on it as a epitaph.
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  10. #20
    greagh greagh is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nedz Newt View Post
    Tangential political connection - he wrote Raglan Road for Hilda Moriarty, later Hilda O'Malley, who married Donogh O'Malley, FF Education minister in the 60s.

    Separately, if you can get hold of Anthony Cronin's book, Dead as Doornails, it's a great read about those times.
    A great dark poem about unrequited love, which brought out one of the greatest vocal performances from Luke Kelly.
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