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  1. #1
    Catalpa Catalpa is offline
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    This day in Irish History 1925 AD: The death of the Venerable Matt Talbot

    7 June 1925: The death of the Venerable Matt Talbot on this day.

    Matt Talbot was on his way to Mass on Sunday, 7 June 1925, when he collapsed and died of heart failure on Granby Lane in Dublin. Nobody at the scene was able to identify him. His body was taken to Jervis Street Hospital, where he was undressed, revealing the extent of his austerities. A heavy chain had been wound around his waist, with more chains around an arm and a leg, and cords around the other arm and leg.

    He was a reformed alcoholic who turned from a life consumed by Drink to one of physical hardship and mortification devoted to religious worship. Matt was born into a large family in Dublin City in 1856. When he was just 12 years old he started to drink and became addicted. He tried numerous times to give it up but met with only temporary success. When he was 28 years old he took the Pledge and kept it until his death 41 years later. A Priest advised him to follow the ways of the early Monks & Holy Men of Ireland in avoiding the Temptations of the Flesh. He henceforth lived a Life of rigorous Work and Prayer.

    He fasted constantly. His breakfast consisted of cocoa prepared the previous evening by his sister, which he often drank cold. With this he ate some dry bread. For his midday meal he had cocoa to which he would add a pinch of tea, and again drank cold. With this he took a slice of bread. His sister would bring him a small evening meal. If she brought fish he would insist that she take it home with her and would make do with bread soaked in the fish juice.

    On Sundays he remained in the church for every Mass. Only on returning to his room at about 2 p.m. would he break his fast for the first time since 6.30 p.m. the previous day. The remainder of the day was spent in prayer, reading the Scriptures and the lives of the saints. He gave all his money to neighbours in need and to the missions.

    Matt Talbot mortified himself rigorously. He slept on a plank bed with a piece of timber for a pillow. This left his face numb in later years. He slept in chains, which he wore for 14 years before his death, round his leg and on his body.
    Reality (July/August 1999), a Redemptorist Publication

    On 6 November 1931, Archbishop Byrne of Dublin opened a sworn inquiry into the alleged claims to holiness of the former dock worker. The Apostolic Process, the official sworn inquiry at the Vatican, began in 1947.

    On 3 October 1975 Pope Paul VI declared him to be Venerable Matt Talbot, which is a step on the road to his canonisation, a process which needs evidence of a physical miracle in order to be successful.His story soon became known to the large Irish émigré communities. Countless addiction clinics, youth hostels, statues and more have been named after him throughout the world from Nebraska to Warsaw to Sydney. One of Dublin's main bridges is also named after him. Pope John Paul II, as a young man, wrote a paper on him.

    Talbot's remains were removed from Glasnevin Cemetery to Our Lady of Lourdes church on Seán McDermott Street, Dublin, in 1972. The tomb has a glass panel through which the coffin may be seen.On his coffin is inscribed the following words:
    'The Servant of God, Matthew Talbot.'

    There is a small plaque in Granby Lane at the site of Matt Talbot's death.

    http://irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/
    Last edited by Catalpa; 7th June 2012 at 10:21 PM.
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  2. #2
    drjimryan2 drjimryan2 is offline

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    I recall the late dr clare's opinion on this man, accurate and right (imo)

    the best thing is to say no more....no saint tho!
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  3. #3
    Analyzer Analyzer is online now
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    We can ask any government ministers from previous government for commentary.

    What would a former FAS Accountant in Fagan's sitting looking into his pint make of it all.....about all that Bass playing tricks on his memory....?

    Or the country solicitor in Offaly trying to come to decipher a riddle called "we are where we are" ?
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  4. #4
    drjimryan2 drjimryan2 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Analyzer View Post
    We can ask any government ministers from previous government for commentary.

    What would a former FAS Accountant in Fagan's sitting looking into his pint make of it all.....about all that Bass playing tricks on his memory....?

    Or the country solicitor in Offaly trying to come to decipher a riddle called "we are where we are" ?
    I think it was the Mater...........'accountant' is an interesting term too
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  5. #5
    Catalpa Catalpa is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by drjimryan2 View Post
    I recall the late dr clare's opinion on this man, accurate and right (imo)

    the best thing is to say no more....no saint tho!
    Well perhaps you would care to share it with us?
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  6. #6
    Third Recount Third Recount is offline

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    Was it Tammy Wynette brought out a song about him "Take these chain from my heart and set me free"
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  7. #7
    pragmaticapproach pragmaticapproach is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catalpa View Post
    7 June 1925: The death of the Venerable Matt Talbot on this day.

    Matt Talbot was on his way to Mass on Sunday, 7 June 1925, when he collapsed and died of heart failure on Granby Lane in Dublin. Nobody at the scene was able to identify him. His body was taken to Jervis Street Hospital, where he was undressed, revealing the extent of his austerities. A heavy chain had been wound around his waist, with more chains around an arm and a leg, and cords around the other arm and leg.

    He was a reformed alcoholic who turned from a life consumed by Drink to one of physical hardship and mortification devoted to religious worship. Matt was born into a large family in Dublin City in 1856. When he was just 12 years old he started to drink and became addicted. He tried numerous times to give it up but met with only temporary success. When he was 28 years old he took the Pledge and kept it until his death 41 years later. A Priest advised him to follow the ways of the early Monks & Holy Men of Ireland in avoiding the Temptations of the Flesh. He henceforth lived a Life of rigorous Work and Prayer.

    He fasted constantly. His breakfast consisted of cocoa prepared the previous evening by his sister, which he often drank cold. With this he ate some dry bread. For his midday meal he had cocoa to which he would add a pinch of tea, and again drank cold. With this he took a slice of bread. His sister would bring him a small evening meal. If she brought fish he would insist that she take it home with her and would make do with bread soaked in the fish juice.

    On Sundays he remained in the church for every Mass. Only on returning to his room at about 2 p.m. would he break his fast for the first time since 6.30 p.m. the previous day. The remainder of the day was spent in prayer, reading the Scriptures and the lives of the saints. He gave all his money to neighbours in need and to the missions.

    Matt Talbot mortified himself rigorously. He slept on a plank bed with a piece of timber for a pillow. This left his face numb in later years. He slept in chains, which he wore for 14 years before his death, round his leg and on his body.
    Reality (July/August 1999), a Redemptorist Publication

    On 6 November 1931, Archbishop Byrne of Dublin opened a sworn inquiry into the alleged claims to holiness of the former dock worker. The Apostolic Process, the official sworn inquiry at the Vatican, began in 1947.

    On 3 October 1975 Pope Paul VI declared him to be Venerable Matt Talbot, which is a step on the road to his canonisation, a process which needs evidence of a physical miracle in order to be successful.His story soon became known to the large Irish émigré communities. Countless addiction clinics, youth hostels, statues and more have been named after him throughout the world from Nebraska to Warsaw to Sydney. One of Dublin's main bridges is also named after him. Pope John Paul II, as a young man, wrote a paper on him.

    Talbot's remains were removed from Glasnevin Cemetery to Our Lady of Lourdes church on Seán McDermott Street, Dublin, in 1972. The tomb has a glass panel through which the coffin may be seen.On his coffin is inscribed the following words:
    'The Servant of God, Matthew Talbot.'

    There is a small plaque in Granby Lane at the site of Matt Talbot's death.
    So a former alcoholic becomes an ascetic, masochistic rosary rattler and this is supposed to be somehow significant? explain? why is this relevant and worthy of a thread?
    Last edited by pragmaticapproach; 7th June 2012 at 08:15 PM.
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  8. #8
    dresden8 dresden8 is offline
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    He may be venerated but you'd hardly ask him to babysit.
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  9. #9
    Catalpa Catalpa is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by pragmaticapproach View Post
    So a former alcoholic becomes an ascetic, sadomasochistic rosary rattler and this is supposed to be somehow significant? explain? why is this relevant and worthy of a thread?
    Because he died on this day in 1925
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  10. #10
    The OD The OD is offline

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    The saddest thing about this is the way an obviously deeply unwell man and his condition has been overlooked rather than acknowledge this man was seriously ill.

    Normal people do not simply give up alcohol without any consequence. That he was found with serious body mortifications is deeply sad and speaks of the depths of his suffering. I am not a religious person, but if I was, I would be questioning what sort of deity rewards someone for having a deeply distressful life and deliberately injures themselves?

    I find it quite bizarre that he is held up as an icon for abstinence and alcoholics - he obviously had deep issues that manifested themselves through drink. He then went on to exchange a substance abuse problem to self harming.

    To make him a symbol for recovering alcoholics is utterly wrong - he didn't deal with his alcoholism and the deeper issue that it was a symptom of and that should be made very clear. There is no cure for alcoholism but it can be dealt with in a healthier way - who believes wrapping chains around oneself and other bizarre forms of 'penance' is neither normal nor healthy behaviour.

    The poor man died still suffering from some deep issue that was never going to be addressed because people of that era were not as informed about mental health issues.

    I guess I will be accused of being anti-Catholic, but to be honest, I don't really care what people think, all I know is is that this man died suffering greatly, both physically and mentally, but we are expected are look to him for inspiration in the struggle against substance abuse? RIP Matt, I hope you really did go to a better place?
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