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  1. #6941
    ireallyshouldknowbetter ireallyshouldknowbetter is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    It was very fair of Assad to let the surrendering terrorists be bussed out of Homs.

    Several other nations would have just used that as a pretense and actually put them in a big hole in the ground or at the very least a harsh prison camp.
    He tried as hard as he could to put them in the ground, they were allowed to leave because SAA has serious manpower shortages and couldn't afford to lose 3,000 men retaking Old Homs from the 1,500 or so rebels holed up there.

    There are persistent reports that frontline SAA troops being captured now are 19 year old conscripts, sent straight to the front during their mandatory military service. Assad's manpower shortage is also why Iran trained and equipped the National Defence Force and ordered Hizbollah to get involved. Sooner or later, Assad will run out of cannon fodder, HA will run out of patience and either Iran will send regular troops or the Alawite regime will fall.
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  2. #6942
    ireallyshouldknowbetter ireallyshouldknowbetter is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    If you want to live in fantasy land that is your choice. Some idiots were so far up the asses of the western effort in Libya swallowing any old tripe that they're too stubborn to face the facts about the aftermath of the Libyan civil war.

    So is Libya as well off now (economically, socially, security wise etc) as it was pre-2011?

    It's a simple question.
    I've already answered it. The answer is yes. Libya is better off in every way than it was under Ghaddafi. It's not perfect, and there are teething problems, as is natural after a one-man state has been taken apart and replaced with a collection of militias and local councils. But yeah, an elected government is always better than a dictator, whatever the niggles.
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  3. #6943
    ireallyshouldknowbetter ireallyshouldknowbetter is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    You expect the Syrian Government/People to be held to ransom by some criminal rabble?
    Those terms are not interchangeable; indeed, had the Syrian government stopped indiscriminately bombing Syrian people in Aleppo, the water would be back on. There was a deal, but the regime forces broke it after a day. LOL at criminal rabble when you look at the actual criminal mafia family that's held power in Syria for 50 years without even once asking the Syrian people if they wanted such stern leadership.
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  4. #6944
    Dubstudent Dubstudent is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ireallyshouldknowbetter View Post
    He tried as hard as he could to put them in the ground, they were allowed to leave because SAA has serious manpower shortages and couldn't afford to lose 3,000 men retaking Old Homs from the 1,500 or so rebels holed up there.

    There are persistent reports that frontline SAA troops being captured now are 19 year old conscripts, sent straight to the front during their mandatory military service. Assad's manpower shortage is also why Iran trained and equipped the National Defence Force and ordered Hizbollah to get involved. Sooner or later, Assad will run out of cannon fodder, HA will run out of patience and either Iran will send regular troops or the Alawite regime will fall.
    They'd be in the ground by now if that was the case. Bussed off under the illusion that they were going to be dropped off, only to be led into a SAA area and disposed of. Most of them are foreign anyway so it would've been hard to track. Strange that such a supposed horrible dictator would be so lenient. I doubt someone of Saddam Hussein's ilk would have allowed terrorists to get off so lightly. It just goes to show that the Syrian Government aren't as murderous as these terrorists.

    I'm not surprised if people don't want to fight. It would be the same here, many many people would rather flee than fight. The Syrian people were used to a peaceful existence and not the roving gangs of barbarous foreign criminals who are ethnically cleansing villages, murdering children for blasphemy and carrying out sexual violence against women.

    It is clear that the Syrian's will defeat the terrorists, the loss of Homs was a massive blow, a huge turning point on the back of several gains for the Syrian's, the conflict is very much in its endgame stage now.
    Last edited by Dubstudent; 12th May 2014 at 02:26 PM.
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  5. #6945
    Dubstudent Dubstudent is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ireallyshouldknowbetter View Post
    I've already answered it. The answer is yes. Libya is better off in every way than it was under Ghaddafi. It's not perfect, and there are teething problems, as is natural after a one-man state has been taken apart and replaced with a collection of militias and local councils. But yeah, an elected government is always better than a dictator, whatever the niggles.
    The answer is no actually. Libya is worse off now economically, socially, and security wise. You're totally deluded to think otherwise.

    The ease in which you brush off the ethnic cleansing of the Tawerghan people is actually quite shocking.

    Libya is still in a state of chaos and violence, almost three years after the conflict ended.
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  6. #6946
    Dubstudent Dubstudent is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ireallyshouldknowbetter View Post
    Those terms are not interchangeable; indeed, had the Syrian government stopped indiscriminately bombing Syrian people in Aleppo, the water would be back on. There was a deal, but the regime forces broke it after a day. LOL at criminal rabble when you look at the actual criminal mafia family that's held power in Syria for 50 years without even once asking the Syrian people if they wanted such stern leadership.
    Turning off the water smacks of desperation and a spent force. They're only prolonging the suffering of the entire country. It is clear that the majority in Syria do not support these criminal gangs that are engaged in terrorism and crimes against humanity. The majority of them are foreign jihadists with no love for Syria whatsoever.

    Letting off car bombs that kill dozens of innocent civilians, suicide bombing civilians indiscriminately, murdering teens for blasphemy, raping women, killing POW's, ethnically cleansing villages etc.

    And you support that criminal rabble?

    Shame.
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  7. #6947
    ireallyshouldknowbetter ireallyshouldknowbetter is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    They'd be in the ground by now if that was the case. Bussed off under the illusion that they were going to be dropped off, only to be led into a SAA area and disposed off.
    That's more or less what they did with those who left under the earlier UN deal. In this case, if they had done that, they wouldn't have gotten back the HA members and Iranian officials, as well as aid to two besieged Alawite villages and the release of some civilian hostages taken in Lattakia last year. They left as part of a deal, it wasn't good grace on the part of the regime, it was a practical arrangement.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    Most of them are foreign anyway so it would've been hard to track. Strange that such a supposed horrible dictator would be so lenient. I doubt someone of Saddam Hussein's ilk would have allowed terrorists to get off so lightly.
    It wasn't really up to Assad, the Homs deal was negotiated by Iran, and involved the return of Iranian military officials. Are you a fan of Saddam Hussein as well, or is it just Ghaddafi and Assad that get you horny?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    It is clear that the Syrian's will defeat the terrorists, the loss of Homs was a massive blow, a huge turning point on the back of several gains for the Syrian's, the conflict is very much in its endgame stage now.
    Arranging to bus out 1,500 starved and besieged rebels so they can fight on elsewhere is not a sign that the regime is on the brink of victory, it's a sign of military weakness. As I've said, Assad is facing severe manpower shortages, that's why he hasn't even sent reinforcements to the south despite the fact that the Daraa rebels are within sight of rif Damascus by some accounts. Assad is losing a half dozen tanks a day at least, and an average of around 100 men, he has failed to secure vast swathes of the capital, has been repeatedly rebuffed in his attempts on Aleppo and Morek, despite allocating massive resources to both, and indeed, the ravaged SAA can't even retake Lattakia province itself despite vowing the crush rebels there in a matter of days; several months later and they're still fighting over Tower 45.

    Occupation forces can secure areas with concentrations of firepower, but the key is attrition over time. Assad's Iranian occupation regime can only survive as long as his supply of foreign fighters remains strong; if Iran is no longer willing or able to defend him, he's finished. Although it's a crude equation, some have suggested that this is a long war of attrition and that Assad will run out of Alawites before the revolution runs out of Sunnis. You also fail to account for the sheer will of the Syrian people to avenge the crimes of the Assad mafia and bring justice to the perpetrators. They will not give up. It's just a matter of time before Assad gets what he deserves.
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  8. #6948
    ireallyshouldknowbetter ireallyshouldknowbetter is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    Turning off the water smacks of desperation and a spent force. They're only prolonging the suffering of the entire country.
    Hardly a spent force if they gained control over Aleppo's water supply recently despite your alleged 'rapid' SAA gains in Aleppo. As it happens, I think turning off the water is criminal; the point is that they were clearly in a strong military position versus SAA if they had the control to do that and rebuff regime attempts to reverse it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    It is clear that the majority in Syria do not support these criminal gangs that are engaged in terrorism and crimes against humanity. The majority of them are foreign jihadists with no love for Syria whatsoever.
    I enjoy your speeches on behalf of the majority of Syrians. You should run against Assad. If he would let you (which of course he wouldn't, only 2 of the 23 candidates who applied have been approved by Assad to run against him).

    Also, there is no credible analysis that suggests the majority of forces on either side are foreign. There are roughly equivalent numbers of foreign fighters on either side: jihadists on one side, Shiite militia Hezbollah and sectarian militas from Iraq with Iranian RG commanders on the other. The numbers I've seen suggests a max of about 10,000 foreign fighters on each side, from fighting forces upwards of 200,000.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dubstudent View Post
    Letting off car bombs that kill dozens of innocent civilians, suicide bombing civilians indiscriminately, murdering teens for blasphemy, raping women, killing POW's, ethnically cleansing villages etc.

    And you support that criminal rabble?

    Shame.
    Sigh.

    You're aware of the crimes of the regime, I'm sure, but you choose to ignore them. I assume you're aware that the revolution started peacefully and was violently put down by the Assad army. You're possibly not aware of the links between ISIS and the Assad regime which released its leaders from prison at the start of the revolution.

    It's a big mess with war crimes on both sides, no doubt, but violence has always been the primary language of the regime, from day one. Assad is ultimately responsible for all of the violence in the same way Hitler was responsible for the carnage of WW2. He started it.
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  9. #6949
    Dubstudent Dubstudent is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ireallyshouldknowbetter View Post
    That's more or less what they did with those who left under the earlier UN deal. In this case, if they had done that, they wouldn't have gotten back the HA members and Iranian officials, as well as aid to two besieged Alawite villages and the release of some civilian hostages taken in Lattakia last year. They left as part of a deal, it wasn't good grace on the part of the regime, it was a practical arrangement.



    It wasn't really up to Assad, the Homs deal was negotiated by Iran, and involved the return of Iranian military officials. Are you a fan of Saddam Hussein as well, or is it just Ghaddafi and Assad that get you horny?



    Arranging to bus out 1,500 starved and besieged rebels so they can fight on elsewhere is not a sign that the regime is on the brink of victory, it's a sign of military weakness. As I've said, Assad is facing severe manpower shortages, that's why he hasn't even sent reinforcements to the south despite the fact that the Daraa rebels are within sight of rif Damascus by some accounts. Assad is losing a half dozen tanks a day at least, and an average of around 100 men, he has failed to secure vast swathes of the capital, has been repeatedly rebuffed in his attempts on Aleppo and Morek, despite allocating massive resources to both, and indeed, the ravaged SAA can't even retake Lattakia province itself despite vowing the crush rebels there in a matter of days; several months later and they're still fighting over Tower 45.

    Occupation forces can secure areas with concentrations of firepower, but the key is attrition over time. Assad's Iranian occupation regime can only survive as long as his supply of foreign fighters remains strong; if Iran is no longer willing or able to defend him, he's finished. Although it's a crude equation, some have suggested that this is a long war of attrition and that Assad will run out of Alawites before the revolution runs out of Sunnis. You also fail to account for the sheer will of the Syrian people to avenge the crimes of the Assad mafia and bring justice to the perpetrators. They will not give up. It's just a matter of time before Assad gets what he deserves.
    Ah so the terrorists were holding the ''aid'' card over two besieged Alawite villages. How Serbian of them. They were also holding innocent civilians as hostages under the threat of death. I'm glad these terrorists are thoroughly on the back foot.

    Horny? Not at all, I care about the welfare of nations and people, what is best for Syria is that it doesn't fall under the control of ultra conservative lunatics that want to drag the country back to the dark ages. I'm not some pathetic armchair cheerleader for Islamist extremists led by the nose on a diet of western propaganda.

    Giving mercy to people is ''a sign of weakness''? What an armchair warrior

    You're clutching at straws. The Syrian military forces are defeating the terrorists. The tide turned many months ago, there is no doubting the fact that the terrorists are very much on the backfoot and on their way to defeat, the cracks between the different groups are showing and they are clearly demoralised after being ground down by a proper military force. They've now lost Homs, they've been pushed back in several other areas also. It is clear that they will be defeated. People should be glad that extremism is being defeated.

    Seeing as you're so delusional about the current situation in Libya, you're overly optimistic view of the terrorists chances at this stage should be taken with a pinch of salt. In the real world, everyone knows that the writing is on the wall for them.

    The Iranians have said that the conflict has already been won by the Syrian's. It is clear now that more violence from the terrorists is futile and is only extending the disruption to ordinary Syrians daily lives. They should take the example of the terrorists in Homs and surrender now.
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  10. #6950
    RichardCameron RichardCameron is offline

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    I would imagine Ishouldknow... is showing no mercy to his member right now while watching some sick Jihadi beheading video or such like, that's the type of creep I think we're dealing with here.
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