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  1. #1
    eurosceptic eurosceptic is offline
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    No French referendum on turkish accession

    Reading mary ellen symon in the DM yesterday and she revealed how the EU's policy of "no to no" took another step with the french government renegeing on their promised referendum on turkish accession. Amazingly they are insisting we vote again!
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  2. #2
    Bobert Bobert is offline
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    I wasn't aware Turkey were joining...
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  3. #3
    FutureTaoiseach FutureTaoiseach is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobert View Post
    I wasn't aware Turkey were joining...
    They are in negotiations on EU membership, though the current Austrian Chancellor was opposed to entry without referendum in his country before the election. The junior coalition partner, the Peoples Party, insisted in the previously that the talks are open-ended as to their outcome which may not be EU membership. Sarkozy meanwhile ran on an anti-Turkish membership platform and has since pushed through constitutional changes that allow Turkish accession by a weighted parliamentary-majority or a referendum - unlike the version Chirac pushed through which required a referendum. Clearly Sarkozy is preparing to sellout on this. Hopefully Austria and Germany won't. Unanimity is required for new members to join under EU law.

    Clear evidence that Sarkozy is planning to break his promises to the French people on blocking Turkish membership:

    [COLOR=#003366]According to Pierre Lellouche[/COLOR], a parliamentarian of France’s governing party whom President Sarkozy has given the task of “relaunching Franco-Turkish relations,” Islamism will be defeated by bringing Turkey into Europe. “We have next door to us, a great secular Muslim country that wants to share our values. It is making the necessary reforms. We would be crazy to say no,” Mr Lellouche says.

    He is, however, opposed to putting the matter of Turkey’s EU admission before the French electorate in a referendum because this is “to pollute the debate” with the fear of Islam. “Some play around with the fear factor: that is unworthy. Turkey is not Islamism or terrorism. Because of the fear of Islam and of Arabs, we are saying no for the wrong reasons.”
    Allowing Turkey into the EU would stretch it to breaking point. Post-911, it would be lunacy to open your borders to a Muslim country of 70 million people. The so-called secularism of Turkey is imposed within its borders by the military and secularist-appointed judges. It cannot impose secularism on its diaspora around the world. Remember that. Turkish membership would also inevitably mean another huge influx of cheap labour at a time when Irish people are losing their jobs by the tens of thousands every month. It would be rubbing salt into the wounds of the Irish unemployed to force them to compete with even more cheap labour from a country with a combined population as large as that of the 10 countries that joined the EU in 2004. The politicians in Dail Eireann should withdraw their slavish support for Turkish entry, which is largely motivated by a desire to help their corporate donors get more slave labour to displace Irish people with and drive down working-conditions. Labour needs to recognise that Turkish EU entry will damage the Irish working-class, and should resist the ideological leftwing tendency to allow excessive internationalism on their part to blind them to this fact. We are not 'citizens of the world' - we are Irish people, thank you very much.
    Last edited by FutureTaoiseach; 5th December 2008 at 03:15 PM.
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  4. #4
    Christine Murray Christine Murray is offline

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    jeebus

    Google article 301 of the Turkish Penal Code. Italy want to speed up accession and France want to halt it. Ireland does not do geopolitical expansion and prob has a euphemism for e.u border unrest.,
    Last edited by Christine Murray; 5th December 2008 at 07:43 PM.
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  5. #5
    locke locke is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by FutureTaoiseach View Post
    Turkish membership would also inevitably mean another huge influx of cheap labour at a time when Irish people are losing their jobs by the tens of thousands every month.
    Quote Originally Posted by FutureTaoiseach View Post
    resist the ideological leftwing tendency to allow excessive internationalism on their part to blind them to this fact.
    How long has cheap labour been a goal of the left?
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  6. #6
    Pauli Pauli is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by FutureTaoiseach View Post
    They are in negotiations on EU membership, though the current Austrian Chancellor was opposed to entry without referendum in his country before the election. The junior coalition partner, the Peoples Party, insisted in the previously that the talks are open-ended as to their outcome which may not be EU membership. Sarkozy meanwhile ran on an anti-Turkish membership platform and has since pushed through constitutional changes that allow Turkish accession by a weighted parliamentary-majority or a referendum - unlike the version Chirac pushed through which required a referendum. Clearly Sarkozy is preparing to sellout on this. Hopefully Austria and Germany won't. Unanimity is required for new members to join under EU law.

    Clear evidence that Sarkozy is planning to break his promises to the French people on blocking Turkish membership:



    Allowing Turkey into the EU would stretch it to breaking point. Post-911, it would be lunacy to open your borders to a Muslim country of 70 million people. The so-called secularism of Turkey is imposed within its borders by the military and secularist-appointed judges. It cannot impose secularism on its diaspora around the world. Remember that. Turkish membership would also inevitably mean another huge influx of cheap labour at a time when Irish people are losing their jobs by the tens of thousands every month. It would be rubbing salt into the wounds of the Irish unemployed to force them to compete with even more cheap labour from a country with a combined population as large as that of the 10 countries that joined the EU in 2004. The politicians in Dail Eireann should withdraw their slavish support for Turkish entry, which is largely motivated by a desire to help their corporate donors get more slave labour to displace Irish people with and drive down working-conditions. Labour needs to recognise that Turkish EU entry will damage the Irish working-class, and should resist the ideological leftwing tendency to allow excessive internationalism on their part to blind them to this fact. We are not 'citizens of the world' - we are Irish people, thank you very much.

    You have excelled yourself, FT. We are to resist the leftwing ideological tendency towards excessive internationalism AND resist the rightwing ideological tendency to race to the bottom on pay, conditions and standards exploited by rightwing corporate gougers. It is your first "balanced" post in ages!
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  7. #7
    Christine Murray Christine Murray is offline

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    sarko will be handing over the presidency come january, this will be a blot on his copybook, however he is still involved in bringing france into nato and working on a mediterrean union. look at article 301.
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  8. #8
    FutureTaoiseach FutureTaoiseach is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by locke View Post
    How long has cheap labour been a goal of the left?
    The political-left have considered it a price worth paying for greater multiculturalism. They denounce the former in public, but in private they are content with their €100,000+ salaries and are conniving in what is going on. The unions haven't.
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  9. #9
    martel martel is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by locke View Post
    How long has cheap labour been a goal of the left?
    The leftist parties in Ireland have been falling over themselves to encourage massive immigration into Ireland. Acting as useful idiots for the gombeen men in Fianna Fail who wanted to please their masters by getting in cheap labour. Let us not have revisionism here. Sinn Fein, Socialist party and Labour have all supported this policy which is bad news for the irish working class. Pat Rabbitte mildly pondered publicly where all this was leading to but debate was shut down by the media multicultural PC extremist attack dogs.
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  10. #10
    Trampas Trampas is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by martel View Post
    Pat Rabbitte mildly pondered publicly where all this was leading to but debate was shut down by the media multicultural PC extremist attack dogs.

    Pat Rabbitte pondered too late, and what is more he did his pondering after he and the Labour Party had done everything possible to derail the Citizenship Referendum. Once that vote was in Rabitte realised where he stood, but even then he couldn't bring the party with him.
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