Register to Comment
Like Tree8990Likes
  1. #10871
    owedtojoy owedtojoy is offline
    owedtojoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    24,575

    Quote Originally Posted by Tombo View Post
    Challenge. Let's just go back to your last post.


    Point out the "hard evidence" contained in the ideological polemnic (it certainly wasn;t a "scientific article") you lifted wholesale from a Warmy Alarmist Cult site (climatecrocks ) and spammed here.
    Return Challenge:

    List the peer-reviewed scientific papers you have posted here in the last month, supporting your denial of the empirical facts buttressing anthropogenic climate change.

    Re-hashed posts from Anthony Watts' website do not count.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  2. #10872
    SirCharles SirCharles is offline
    SirCharles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    11,213

    Quote Originally Posted by Tombo View Post
    Challenge. Let's just go back to your last post.


    Point out the "hard evidence" contained in the ideological polemnic (it certainly wasn;t a "scientific article") you lifted wholesale from a Warmy Alarmist Cult site (climatecrocks ) and spammed here.
    Some "challenge" indeed, Trollo. Did you fall into your Whiskey glas? I am constantly posting hard evidence and scientific articles, not only Wattsupwiththat shyte like you.



    Quote Originally Posted by owedtojoy View Post
    Return Challenge:

    List the peer-reviewed scientific papers you have posted here in the last month, supporting your denial of the empirical facts buttressing anthropogenic climate change.

    Re-hashed posts from Anthony Watts' website do not count.
    You are expecting mission impossible from Trollo.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  3. #10873
    SirCharles SirCharles is offline
    SirCharles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    11,213

    Maybe Trollo will come up with fake graphs and fake conclusions from "Steven Goddard" (the real name is a secret, this guy seemingly is scared of releasing his real idendity). I went on his "Real Science" blog site twice, and these two times I could debunk him as a fraudster. That's enough for me
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  4. #10874
    owedtojoy owedtojoy is offline
    owedtojoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    24,575

    A redoubtable senior from New England studies the effect of climate change on the maple syrup she makes on her farm.



    Edit: I thought the lady was from Vermont from the map, but in fact she is from neighbouring New Hampshire. I did pen this tribute to Vermont, which is one part of the US I really like, along with Boston! Even New Hampshire ain't bad!

    PS Vermont (means Green Mountain) is the second smallest state of the Union, and (for trivia lovers) was the first to join the Union after the original 13. It's mountain people are pretty tough and individualistic, like the lady in the video - they have the cojones to elect an Independent democratic socialist to the Senate (Bernie Sanders), without the permission of Fox News.

    I was privileged to visit the state (and New Hampshire!) many times on business back in the 1980s. Lake Champlain points towards Canada like a finger, and it was around here the British, the French and the Indians fought a three-sided war (see Last of the Mohicans) in the 18th century. Many of the locals still have French Canadian blood. Ethan Allan and the Green Mountain Boys demanded the surrender of Fort Ticonderoga in 1775, as legend has it, "In the name of the great Jehovah and the Continental Congress." The fort, a stone-built start-shaped fort, more European than American in style, is still there on the shore of the Lake. I should add here that the guns of the fort were dragged to Boston to bombard the British and liberate the city.
    Last edited by owedtojoy; 6th January 2012 at 08:32 PM.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  5. #10875
    owedtojoy owedtojoy is offline
    owedtojoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    24,575

    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  6. #10876
    owedtojoy owedtojoy is offline
    owedtojoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    24,575

    Quote Originally Posted by owedtojoy View Post
    More hockey sticks ... this time based on estimations from glaciers lengths of over 300 glaciers ... nothing to do with Michael Mann or tree rings, but very similar results - same as results from boreholes, sediments, corals ...




    Paper by two European scientists - LeClerq and Oertlemans.

    Global and hemispheric temperature reconstruction from glacier length fluctuations
    This post is dedicated to Tombo, kront999 and all climate science deniers, who love both hockey sticks and glaciers, therefore will doubly love to see them combined.

    May they have a short, unhappy time in denial for 2012, and emerge into enlightenment sometime during the year. Amen.
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  7. #10877
    SirCharles SirCharles is offline
    SirCharles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    11,213

    Quote Originally Posted by owedtojoy View Post
    Fracking hell...
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  8. #10878
    SirCharles SirCharles is offline
    SirCharles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    11,213



    Happy New Year! Save energy and resources
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  9. #10879
    SirCharles SirCharles is offline
    SirCharles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    11,213

    The greenhouse effect explained in simple words:

    Isaac Asimov: Warning of Greenhouse Effect in 1977


    January 6, 2012



    A lot of people have seen Science Fiction giant and physicist Isaac Asimov’s video talk from 1989 ( posted below the fold here) – but he was talking about climate change and sea level rise much earlier – as this 1977 radio interview shows.

    Sign in or Register Now to reply

  10. #10880
    kront999 kront999 is offline
    kront999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    888

    Quote Originally Posted by owedtojoy View Post
    This post is dedicated to Tombo, kront999 and all climate science deniers.
    What I expected from a charlatan watermelon in denial of IPCC AR4.

    More on the methane chlatrate scare stories poliferated by resident charlatan watermelons.

    Natural Resources and the Environment - Dot Earth Blog - NYTimes.com

    December 28, 2011, 1:13 pm
    More Views on Climate Risk and Arctic Methane
    By ANDREW C. REVKIN
    In trying to clarify what’s known, unknown and learnable about the possible contribution to global warming from vast methane deposits beneath Arctic seas, I reached out to a host of scientists working on this question. I also received a lot of reader input, as you can see from the comment threads in the string of posts on this important issue. Here’s a roundup of some additional views from the scientific community and one filmmaker focused on question:
    Raymond T. Pierrehumbert, a climate scientist at the University of Chicago and contributor to Realclimate.org (and sometimes Dot Earth), sent this thought:
    Regarding the methane time-bomb issue, I do understand the need to respond to unwarranted predictions of catastrophe. I’ve made responses of this type myself. For example I think that Jim Hansen is demonstrably wrong in his assertion that a Venus-type runaway greenhouse is a virtual certainty if we burn all the coal; he is right about almost everything and I greatly admire him, but he is wrong about this.
    Countering an assertion like that has the unfortunate consequence that some people say, “Whew, ducked a bullet there,” and go on to think that the rest of the consequences of global warming don’t look so bad in comparison with turning into Venus, not remembering that a lot of those consequences can still be very bad indeed.
    But the clathrate release problem is in a rather different category from the runaway greenhouse issue. It has to be seen as just one of the many fast or slow carbon catastrophes possibly awaiting us, in a system we are just groping to understand. The models of destabilization are largely based on variants of diffusive heat transport, but the state of understanding of slope avalanches and other more exotic release mechanisms is rather poor — and even if it turns out that rapid methane degassing isn’t in the cards, you still do have to worry about those several trillion metric tons of near-surface carbon and how secure they are. It’s like worrying about the state of security of Soviet nuclear warheads, but where you have no idea what kind of terrorists there might be out there and what their capabilities are — and on what time scales they operate.
    Edward Brook, a climate scientist and geochemist at Oregon State University, sent a comment as part of a group e-mail exchange that included this relevant thought:
    One problem with this discussion is that there is no definition of “time bomb” so people get confused. It seems quite likely that continued global warming will increase the emissions of methane from permafrost deposits and marine hydrates. Some of that will get in to the atmosphere, though … some will also be consumed in the water column and in soils. This “chronic” source may increase over time, and affect climate, but for the reasons you discussed it is likely to be slow, and not a catastrophic risk. Of course it is still important. For a somewhat dated view of this topic, see [link].
    Gary Houser, an environmental writer and producer of a documentary that’s being made about Arctic methane, sent a rebuttal of my initial post in this string, “Methane Time Bomb in Arctic Seas – Apocalypse Not.” Here’s an introductory riff and link to his full piece:
    As co-producer of an upcoming in-depth documentary on the methane issue, I am stunned at how Revkin has dismissed the concerns of those trying to alert the world to the danger of a methane runaway feedback. It is one of the scenarios most feared by climate scientists. Once triggered, an abrupt downward spiral could ensue which humanity might be helpless to stop. When the factors which could unleash a runaway are beginning to line up, it is a time for humanity to take a pause from its many distractions and look.
    Revkin’s search for unequivocal “evidence” that such “runaway disruption” is already underway ignores the key danger we face. If humanity waits until this level of “proof” is obtained, it will very likely be far too late to stop the colossal forces that will already be in motion.
    In my full counterpoint, I present seven major reasons why the situation is one of great urgency. They are listed below. I urge the reader to please consider my more complete statement.
    1) A force that has already demonstrated its awesome power during earlier periods on Earth-
    2) Grasping the meaning of “irreversible” runaway train-
    3) Insistence on “evidence” trumped by need to act preventatively-
    4) The factors present which could launch a “runaway”-
    5) The creation of a collision course toward methane release-
    6) A classic moment to invoke the precautionary principle-
    7) An immediate need to escalate a scientific inquiry of methane-
    Read the full piece here.
    Richard B. Alley, the climate scientist and ice sheet prober at Pennsylvania State University (and host of the PBS series “Earth: The Operators’ Manual“), wrote this: Read more…



    Leaders of Arctic Methane Project Clarify Climate Concerns - NYTimes.com


    January 4, 2012, 5:18 pm
    ‘Much Ado About Methane’
    By ANDREW C. REVKIN
    David Archer, the author of “The Long Thaw” and a Realclimate.org contributor, has weighed in at length on questions and assertions about the greenhouse risk posed by methane released from warming Arctic seabeds and tundra.
    Josh Haner/The New York Times
    In an Alaskan lake, bubbles of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, collect beneath the ice. More Photos
    I encourage you to have a look in relation to the string of recent posts here aiming to restore some scientific weight to an overheated debate that has even led one online community, the Arctic Methane Emergency Group, to call for urgent geoengineering countermeasures.
    Here’s one excerpt and a link to the rest of the piece, which concludes, as many climate scientists do, that CO2, not CH4, remains the key target if the goal is limiting disruptive greenhouse warming:
    The possibility of a catastrophic release is of course what gives methane its power over the imagination (of journalists in particular it seems). A submarine landslide might release a Gigaton of carbon as methane (Archer, 2007), but the radiative effect of that would be small, about equal in magnitude (but opposite in sign) to the radiative forcing from a volcanic eruption. Detectable perhaps but probably not the end of humankind as a species.
    What could happen to methane in the Arctic?
    The methane bubbles coming from the Siberian shelf are part of a system that takes centuries to respond to changes in temperature. The methane from the Arctic lakes is also potentially part of a new, enhanced, chronic methane release to the atmosphere. Neither of them could release a catastrophic amount of methane (hundreds of Gtons) within a short time frame (a few years or less). There isn’t some huge bubble of methane waiting to erupt as soon as its roof melts.
    And so far, the sources of methane from high latitudes are small, relative to the big player, which is wetlands in warmer climes. It is very difficult to know whether the bubbles are a brand-new methane source caused by global warming, or a response to warming that has happened over the past 100 years, or whether plumes like this happen all the time. In any event, it doesn’t matter very much unless they get 10 or 100 times larger, because high-latitude sources are small compared to the tropics. [Read the rest.]
    In case you missed it, there’s more on the seabed methane emissions from Justin Gillis on the Green blog and an analysis of methane media coverage by Charles Petit at the Knight Science Journalism Tracker and another by Curtis Brainard at the Columbia Journalism Review
    Sign in or Register Now to reply

Sign in to CommentRegister to Comment