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  1. #21
    Dame_Enda Dame_Enda is online now
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    Yes. We produce 650% more beef than we consume. Farmers should diversify their production towards mutton, lamb and crops. And forestry too. Forestry would actually reduce net emissions because they store carbon for perhaps thousands of years.

    I remember when FF-PD were touting the 'millenium goals' of planting 1 million trees. Didn't happen like so much else that govt promised (can anyone say "zero tolerance"?).
    Last edited by Dame_Enda; 9th April 2018 at 05:17 PM.
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  2. #22
    gerhard dengler gerhard dengler is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by cozzy121 View Post
    It's plain to see that with the advent of the Fodder Crisis as usual farmers have allowed greed to dictate their decisions.
    They cannot feed they cattle they have not only due to the poor weather they've experienced, but also to the fact they have too many of the poor creatures.
    I think the department of agriculture should, on animal welfare grounds, audit farmers and their herds and put down the excess that the farmers obviously cannot feed.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/f...cows-1.3452925
    Transfer ownership of those cattle that some farmers cannot look after, to farmers who have the capacity to look after said animals, as a short term solution?

    It is an interesting conundrum that the fodder situation has created. Our farming industry is well capable of managing increased herd sizes, but it is appears that some farmers have badly managed the resources that they do control - and the bad weather has found them out as a result.
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  3. #23
    good dog good dog is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dame_Enda View Post
    Yes. We produce 11 times more food than we can consume. Farmers should diversify their production towards mutton, lamb and crops. And forestry too. Forestry would actually reduce net emissions because they store carbon for perhaps thousands of years.

    I remember when FF-PD were touting the 'millenium goals' of planting 1 million trees. Didn't happen like so much else that govt promised (can anyone say "zero tolerance"?).
    They destroyed 350,000 hectares of perfectly good bog by planting trees. Bogs are far better at storage of carbon than trees.
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  4. #24
    The Eagle of the Ninth The Eagle of the Ninth is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by cozzy121 View Post
    It's plain to see that with the advent of the Fodder Crisis as usual farmers have allowed greed to dictate their decisions.
    They cannot feed they cattle they have not only due to the poor weather they've experienced, but also to the fact they have too many of the poor creatures.
    I think the department of agriculture should, on animal welfare grounds, audit farmers and their herds and put down the excess that the farmers obviously cannot feed.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/f...cows-1.3452925
    No, moron. Irish beef exports are worth 3 billion and account for 30 per cent of our food and drink exports.

    90% of all beef is exported.

    Catch a grip.
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  5. #25
    cozzy121 cozzy121 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerhard dengler View Post
    Transfer ownership of those cattle that some farmers cannot look after, to farmers who have the capacity to look after said animals, as a short term solution?

    It is an interesting conundrum that the fodder situation has created. Our farming industry is well capable of managing increased herd sizes, but it is appears that some farmers have badly managed the resources that they do control - and the bad weather has found them out as a result.
    I Heard an interview on RTE radio last week with Farmers in Athenry mart. Some were saying how bad it was, 1 farmer said he had a1-2 weeks fodder left and was grateful for it. he then said (sic) "some of the others will be caught out badly". Which to me, seem to indicate that some took a gamble and lost.
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  6. #26
    cozzy121 cozzy121 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Eagle of the Ninth View Post
    No, moron. Irish beef exports are worth 3 billion and account for 30 per cent of our food and drink exports.

    90% of all beef is exported.

    Catch a grip.
    Hi, We have to IMPORT our fodder to feed these beef cattle. Is it not reasonable to ask if we have too many?
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  7. #27
    gerhard dengler gerhard dengler is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by cozzy121 View Post
    I Heard an interview on RTE radio last week with Farmers in Athenry mart. Some were saying how bad it was, 1 farmer said he had a1-2 weeks fodder left and was grateful for it. he then said (sic) "some of the others will be caught out badly". Which to me, seem to indicate that some took a gamble and lost.
    If there is one industry where networking appears to work, it is in farming. If one farmer cannot manage the resources which he has, there is an extensive network of other farmers, some of whom might be willing to acquire the stock that the farmer cannot manage?

    Granted this would mean that an individual farmer who have to admit to having gotten something wrong - and that ain't easy regardless.
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  8. #28
    good dog good dog is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by gerhard dengler View Post
    Transfer ownership of those cattle that some farmers cannot look after, to farmers who have the capacity to look after said animals, as a short term solution?

    It is an interesting conundrum that the fodder situation has created. Our farming industry is well capable of managing increased herd sizes, but it is appears that some farmers have badly managed the resources that they do control - and the bad weather has found them out as a result.
    The thing is they don't have to keep them. Cattle trade is very good, top prices for all store cattle including dry cows and also milking cows in calf or calved.

    It's those that increased their herd sizes over the last few years that are mainly hit. Farmers milking 50 cows a few years ago now milking 80+ etc.

    A lot has a a bad year last year due to weather with small crops and cattle housed early. Were basically gambling on a good 2018 Spring that didn't happen. They had plenty of time to reduce numbers and prices were good.
    I saw a newspaper heading that creed dis too little too late. I think it was the farmers and not creed that did too little too late.
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  9. #29
    Fr Peter McWhinger Fr Peter McWhinger is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dame_Enda View Post
    Yes. We produce 11 times more food than we can consume. Farmers should diversify their production towards mutton, lamb and crops. And forestry too. Forestry would actually reduce net emissions because they store carbon for perhaps thousands of years.

    I remember when FF-PD were touting the 'millenium goals' of planting 1 million trees. Didn't happen like so much else that govt promised (can anyone say "zero tolerance"?).
    Where did you get 11 times more from?
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  10. #30
    Fr Peter McWhinger Fr Peter McWhinger is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Eagle of the Ninth View Post
    No, moron. Irish beef exports are worth 3 billion and account for 30 per cent of our food and drink exports.

    90% of all beef is exported.

    Catch a grip.
    So 564,000 tonnes earn €3,000,000,000 in exports? (€5.32 per kg) Beef farming generates about €200 per tonne of CO2 emitted. Its a third world industry that we subsidise heavily and we should be getting out of the business.
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