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  1. #11
    lying eyes lying eyes is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roman Emperor View Post
    I don't think there's any law against rainwater harvesting...yet !.
    Shush, bully boy Phil, might be listening?
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  2. #12
    Roman Emperor Roman Emperor is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by cabledude View Post
    I remember my grandparents had a large barrel under the rainwater chutes. Full barrel of water for watering garden, plants and washing windows cars etc. No reason why we can't use rainwater to replace fresh water for 'greywater' use i.e. washing machines showers toilets etc.
    Yes indeed. We had a water barrel at the front and rear of the house when I was young.If one of us kids went missing the first place my mother would check was the barrel !
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  3. #13
    Roman Emperor Roman Emperor is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by RepublicOfLuas View Post
    Exactly. The water system is riddled with leaks. The proposed money for meter installation would be better spent on replacing the pipes.
    True. Water mains installed in the 70's using 4" and 6" asbestos pipes are prone to leakage too,as the ground around them shifts.
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  4. #14
    Blucher Blucher is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainy man View Post
    I have no water supply where I live and collect all the water for the house and garden, at any one time I have 4000 litres in reserve, I have a composting loo which needs no water. on average I use only 500-600 litres a week, usually no shortage of rain here in the north west. Peronaly I hate flushing toilets and the waste of potable water wasted down them. I hope for a time when no house can be constructed without a harvesting system at the very least supplying the toilet and washing machine system.
    And we've just had the biggest house building boom in the history of the State.

    Modest new houses in Dublin costing in excess of a half a million Euro becuase of recyling global surplus.

    It woulld not have cost more than 2,000 per house to fit a grey/rain water system.

    It would not have added one Euro cent to the cost of the house.

    It was not done.

    That is a measure of the leadership we have in this tragic country.
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  5. #15
    DownTheyGo DownTheyGo is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by cabledude View Post
    I remember my grandparents had a large barrel under the rainwater chutes. Full barrel of water for watering garden, plants and washing windows cars etc. No reason why we can't use rainwater to replace fresh water for 'greywater' use i.e. washing machines showers toilets etc.
    A family place in Meath has a few of those barrels under the various chutes. The water is much better for hair washing and the like, apparently !! Also used for watering vegetables, garden etc. during dry periods. We could fill a few hundred barrels year round if we had the barrels and storage. The problem of course being, given Ireland's climate, when a dry period sprouts, a few barrels dont last long but the same barrels could have been filled 100 times over throughout the year.
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  6. #16
    RepublicOfLuas RepublicOfLuas is offline
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    Did the Green "Party" ever have a policy on all new homes having this type of system? I can't seem to find anything on their website.
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  7. #17
    hairylemon hairylemon is offline
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    A tip for all you guys wishing to save rainwater, raise a 45 gal drum up to about 3 ft, link another one 1ft lower, followed by a 3rd one at ground level, ( you can add in a 4th if required), connect the first one to the gutter, then drill a hole and fit a length of pipe between the first and second drums and continue in that manner.

    I have 6 linked from my glass house and a further four from my garden shed, as yet i haven't touched the downpipes from the house (asbestos), all of my garden needs are now catered for, now thinking of placing a series of drums directly into the attic, just have to figure a way to collect directly from the gutters, if this does turn out to be successful, this will cover the toilet sistern.

    When water charging comes in, i will expect to have little or no bill to pay, taking into consideration a possible average water usage allowance.
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  8. #18
    Peppermint Peppermint is offline

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    I reckon harvesting rain water has some potential in this country, over the next few years.
    A lot will depend on the level of water charges, when they are introduced, as to whether alternatives are competitive.

    Harvesting rain water here is fairly straight forward. But introducing it to your average consumer isn't.

    If, for example, you want to harvest and use rain water for flushing the loo, you need a large water store somewhere? If you have a store you need a bit a a control system to decide which water to use..
    If your rain store emptied, you would want your water system to switch to the, paid for, water system, with little (or preferably no) user intervention.
    At the basic level water harvesting is simple, but to introduce it into the average home requires some thought...
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  9. #19
    olli rehn olli rehn is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainy man View Post
    I have no water supply where I live and collect all the water for the house and garden, at any one time I have 4000 litres in reserve, I have a composting loo which needs no water. on average I use only 500-600 litres a week, usually no shortage of rain here in the north west. Peronaly I hate flushing toilets and the waste of potable water wasted down them. I hope for a time when no house can be constructed without a harvesting system at the very least supplying the toilet and washing machine system.
    Same here-the reserve is 18000 litres in several tanks.We are more than one person.Average use is 1800 litres in 10 days- I have a metre in the system.
    Toilet is a dry one as well.
    Never ran out of water, the wife is very happy with the system ( very important).
    Drinking water comes from a private well. The rainwater is used for everything else.
    There is no law preventing you from harvesting rainwater and using it. However you cannot use the same pipes in your house if the house is connected to a public water sheme. There is a danger of contamination-so they say. You easily can use half inch pipes for a secondary system for the bathroom- toilet,shower/bath and washing machine.
    Do not worry about any shortages- our tanks are always filled to the top- it rains all the time.
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  10. #20
    olli rehn olli rehn is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownTheyGo View Post
    A family place in Meath has a few of those barrels under the various chutes. The water is much better for hair washing and the like, apparently !! Also used for watering vegetables, garden etc. during dry periods. We could fill a few hundred barrels year round if we had the barrels and storage. The problem of course being, given Ireland's climate, when a dry period sprouts, a few barrels dont last long but the same barrels could have been filled 100 times over throughout the year.
    There are special water tanks on the market- they cost about 450 euros for a 1500 l tank. Must be certified for potable water- and ordinary oil tank cannot be used. Several tanks in a row keep you afloat. I have a small tower behind the house with a tank on top. I use a pump to fill it with water from the tanks positioned around the house and sheds. This gives me the pressure in the tabs. A filling lasts about 10 days.
    Important- you have to clean the gutters- leaves can block them.Do not worry about a dirt film in the tanks- this is the living space of valuable bacteria killing all the bad ones. Never clean too much. The cleaner the tanks, the less of valuable bacteria.

    Make no mistakes- this system does NOT give you water for free. There is a lot of work involved to keep it running, i.e. cleaning,repairs,work time,electricity,filters. The water from my system costs more than from the local sheme- if I take everything in consideration. But I have some advantages: I created the system and run it myself....something for the old ego. I am never without water- the neighbours cannot say that. I never get water with a smell of slurry out of the tab. Best of all: Nobody coming to collect money- I exploit myself...
    Last edited by olli rehn; 5th May 2012 at 03:11 AM.
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