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  1. #11
    Lord Talbot Lord Talbot is offline
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    Ireland is an English speaking country. Our first language is English.
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  2. #12
    fifilawe fifilawe is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Talbot View Post
    Ireland is an English speaking country. Our first language is English.
    English is our main language , but Gaeilge is/was our first language, there is a difference má thuigeann tú leat mé.
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  3. #13
    Lagertha Lagertha is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by fifilawe View Post
    English is our main language , but Gaeilge is/was our first language, there is a difference má thuigeann tú leat mé.
    Most Irish people, including myself, speak very little Irish and understand even less of it when we hear it spoken or see it written down. I have no idea what the English translation for most of the names of local housing estates is because they are in Irish and I don't speak Irish. It is time to make the Irish language an optional subject and use the time it takes up in the average school day for more practical things like extra classes in math or other subjects which many children struggle with. While we're at it we can get rid of all religious lessons of all denominations too and replace it with something else.
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  4. #14
    Lord Talbot Lord Talbot is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by fifilawe View Post
    English is our main language , but Gaeilge is/was our first language, there is a difference má thuigeann tú leat mé.
    No
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  5. #15
    macedo macedo is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by fifilawe View Post
    these websites do not produce anything of any journalistic value they are simply copying the work of "real news sources and putting their 2c of value on it " to get clicks.They don't employ journalists , they employ computer operators who do copy, edit , and paste jobs on others' work.In school examinations parlance they are guilty of plagiarism.
    just consider if a reputable "News Source" leaked a "False World Exclusive with all bells and whistles" to find out who is just free-riding on their work.Within an hour or two " copycat websites would have their own version of the story with just small print links to the source of the story.Which company is to to pay damages to the parties defamed in the "stories released " to the world.?
    Are you only referring to online news? Does the fact the printed IT had an article on this issue by its Education editor on its front page count for anything in your opinion?

    If, as I suspect, not, I'd be curious to know what your idea of "real news sources" is.
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  6. #16
    Schuhart Schuhart is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by fifilawe View Post
    these websites do not produce anything of any journalistic value they are simply copying the work of "real news sources and putting their 2c of value on it " to get clicks.
    Grand, matter for a completely different topic as this thread is concerned with the substance of the story and not whether it was penned by Marvin the Paranoid Android.
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  7. #17
    recedite recedite is offline

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    One third of the pupils in my kids class (primary school) had dyslexia certs to avoid mandatory Irish. Its farcical.
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  8. #18
    livingstone livingstone is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by A Voice View Post
    Which really has nothing to do with dyslexia at that point.
    Of course it does.

    The fact is that for someone with dyslexia, the difficulty associated with learning two languages may simply not be sustainable. The difficulty with learning one language may just about be tolerable for some.

    For those kids, we have a choice:

    (a) tell them unless they are prepared to learn two languages, they can't do any

    (b) tell them that unlike their peers, because of a specific learning condition, they have to leave school without a useful European language because we insist that they use their available bandwidth to learn Irish instead
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  9. #19
    A Voice A Voice is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by livingstone View Post
    Of course it does.

    The fact is that for someone with dyslexia, the difficulty associated with learning two languages may simply not be sustainable. The difficulty with learning one language may just about be tolerable for some.

    For those kids, we have a choice:

    (a) tell them unless they are prepared to learn two languages, they can't do any

    (b) tell them that unlike their peers, because of a specific learning condition, they have to leave school without a useful European language because we insist that they use their available bandwidth to learn Irish instead
    No, it doesn't.

    I've highlighted what it's about, from your own mouth.

    If it was about dyslexia, then the issue would, and should, arise for all subjects. Dyslexia is not a language-specific issue; it is a written discourse issue. To get a legitimate dyslexia exemption, you need to have problems with spelling that affect any discipline that requires extensive reading and writing. English, history, and geography will top that list.
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  10. #20
    recedite recedite is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by livingstone View Post
    Of course it does.

    The fact is that for someone with dyslexia, the difficulty associated with learning two languages may simply not be sustainable. The difficulty with learning one language may just about be tolerable for some.

    For those kids, we have a choice:

    (a) tell them unless they are prepared to learn two languages, they can't do any

    (b) tell them that unlike their peers, because of a specific learning condition, they have to leave school without a useful European language because we insist that they use their available bandwidth to learn Irish instead
    You're living in cloud cuckoo land. Humans don't have "available bandwidth".
    There may well be a tiny minority who have such difficulty with languages that they should be excused from learning them.
    The fact that large numbers are obtaining certs to avoid irish, but still going on to study living languages is nothing to do with that.
    Its because they see Irish as a waste of time and effort. There is no justification for making it mandatory in this day and age. Edward AKA Eamon De Valera is long dead.
    Interesting fact BTW, the name Sinead was invented by Dev for his wife because there was no Irish version of Jane at the time.
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