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  1. #21
    cobra cobra is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by General Urko View Post
    And when you factor in cost of accommodation, we would be higher than 7th!
    You would have to question the value of third level education here in terms of people getting jobs out of it!
    In a highly classist society like ours, what you know is very much a secondary consideration to who you know!
    We have a hugely paradoxical situation in that we have people who are educated to masters levels working on assembly lines and stacking shelves while at the same time we have huge numbers of Irish People at a level where they are just about B2 fluent in English, sucking the public tit dry as 'public servants'!
    You hit the nail with that one. it gets worse though, the clowns (ie civil servants, sic ) who struggled to get a basic arts degree in some useless irrelevant subject, and could never survive in the commercial world are now making the rules.
    Ireland is Little Nigeria
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  2. #22
    ionsniffer ionsniffer is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by dizillusioned View Post
    Just proves education is a business nowadays.
    there are 1000s of courses for those unemployed subsidized by the state. I don't know where they think the jobs are going to come from.
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  3. #23
    devoutcapitalist devoutcapitalist is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trainwreck View Post
    Still not high enough. The proliferation of crap dressed up as "third level education" at massive taxpayer cost is but another thing strangling our country.
    We have a load of crappy courses that are utterly irrelevant in the Real World, Arts in the NUI universities and Trinity for starters not to mention all those useless sociology courses.
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  4. #24
    gatsbygirl20 gatsbygirl20 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ardillaun View Post
    Grade inflation for a start.
    Yes, it is the predictable result of seeing students as "consumers"

    We will soon see the same thing happening at Second Level

    The customer is always right.

    The customer is entitled to an A. After all, every customer is entitled to the best.

    That is what they paid for. It's a simple transaction.

    Plus, the "provider" wants to show how "customer-focused" they are, by handing out A grades to all and sundry--and trumpeting this on their advertising literature.

    Only elitist old fogies would disagree with this modern, market-driven approach to the "business of education"
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  5. #25
    dizillusioned dizillusioned is offline
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    Would someone PLEASE correct the typo in the Thread Title????

    I keep getting an itchy nose looking at it.....
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  6. #26
    gleeful gleeful is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by dizillusioned View Post
    Would someone PLEASE correct the typo in the Thread Title????

    I keep getting an itchy nose looking at it.....
    Hadn't noticed. Now can't unsee.
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  7. #27
    NYCKY NYCKY is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roberto Jordan View Post
    You are interchanging the federal and private student loan systems in the US>

    In my view a public ally backed student loan system is a perfectly reasonable means of funding a third and fourth level education system.

    Certainly in my case as the child of the squeezed middle it is preferable to the irish system whereby I was dependent on limited parental support, my own earnings and private loans to pay for my expenses - a fact the impacted my decision making significantly ( turned out ok in the end but thats not the point, right). The fact my father was a wage earner , rather than being unemployed ( either actually or only "officially" ) or self-employed, meant I could have starved and never received penny in support. So my parents paid my registration ( think it was a few hundred pounds a year in the 90s') and gave me 20 pounds a week, my summer earnings went on rent and my borrowings on books, food and socializing.
    I paid my loans off to the wonderful folks at AIB 5 years after I started working, at which point I was able to consider buying a car........( not before I had to get my license , because ireland doesnt do "divers ed" for kids of parents who cant pay 1000 euro to insure them )...I f I had gone to an "in state" school in the US or ad the academic prowess to get into a reputable private college ( bragging here but would likely have been in the mix...) I would have got a partial scholarship at least, and at 90's fees levels ended up with maybe $20k more debt at most - not good I accept but not a million miles away....

    The problem in the US are the exorbitant tuition fees which have grown massively disproportionately in the last 30 years. Some of the fee inflation is a direct result of bad government ( reduction in state and federal support) but some of it is also due to the greed of the institutions themselves.

    Unarguably the US has , in terms of quality , scope and resources the finest third / fourth level system in the world - where it falls down is access - rather like health care ......the difference being the US has never had a good health care system but had, I truly believe, the greatest third level system in human history in the post WWII years - with any one of requisite ability able to go to the worlds finest institutions for a very marginal amount.

    However one observation, in recent years the government has been stamping down on private colleges in particular but also the community college system from encouraging students to pursue quasi=vocational academic courses which offer far poorer probability of eventual career success than is claimed. This extends to low level ( the old cert/ diploma stuff) STEM courses. In ireland the same "market" is served primarily by the ITs and occasionally by universities. Understand I am not speaking against the IT network in general but rather its inflation or some areas it serves. This is where I think the Irish systems needs to look at wastage , drop out rates and
    The tuition fees are growing way beyond inflation, some of it is to do with hiring hordes of diversity officers, creating safe spaces and various measures to sooth the snowflakes. On top of all that, many colleges are sitting on huge endowments, that several do nothing with but watch them grow.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...s_by_endowment


    Forbes have a good article here on the college endowments.


    https://www.forbes.com/sites/ccap/20.../#44b678e7559f



    It turns out there are about 3,000 four year colleges and universities in the U.S.
    All universities combined as of last June 30 had a bit over $500 billion in endowments.
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  8. #28
    mckearney mckearney is offline
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    Yes, education rises in price from year to year. But, if there were good systems of helping students (compensation), as in Sweden, it would be easier.
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  9. #29
    hurling_lad hurling_lad is offline

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    We might have the seventh-highest fees, but we have the fifth-highest proportion of people with a 3rd level education among OECD countries, so the system seems to be working.

    https://data.oecd.org/eduatt/populat...-education.htm
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  10. #30
    Whocares386 Whocares386 is offline

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    Which one has the best education ? If I'm not wrong England has the best universities in the world.
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