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  1. #21
    Ex celt Ex celt is offline

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    The Culvert Bomb was perfected by sf/ira and is now de rigueur in Afghanistan,Iraq and Cullyhanna.
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  2. #22
    owedtojoy owedtojoy is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nudavongs View Post
    I'm starting this because I think we could do with a thread where Irish scientific successes are highlighted here.

    I think it's something that's needed because the achievements of Irish scientists in this day and age (never mind decades ago) are under-recognised.

    A lot of it will be quite technical but I won't be quoting directly from the science journals so it shouldn't be too hard to understand.

    This being Politics.ie, I'm aware that this thread is likely to be derailed by people saying:
    - Irish science education is useless and/or
    - Irish scientists are useless and/or
    - Irish scientific research policy is useless
    etc....

    While I have no control of it, I would plead with such people to take such concerns to another thread. If we're agreed that Irish scientists are under-recognised, then derailing a thread devoted to recognising them kind of puts you on the other side of the fence since then the occasional entry on the achievements of Irish science will be lost in dozens of posts where people are swinging at each other.


    Thank you in advance.
    What a load of bollocks.

    We are supposed to use this thread to say how FANTASTIC Irish research has been, parading its many SUCCESSES like a pageant.

    It's failures, or the fact that most Irish scientists earned their successes in other countries, the latest being William Campbell, who is now a citizen of the USA, we are told are not to be mentioned lest we offend the virtuous.

    The demand for "Good news stories only, please" is demeaning and unbalanced, but typically Irish. We can proceed to tell each other how great we are, and ignore the truth, that we have also had many failures and may not be as great as we think in many arenas.

    Why bother?
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  3. #23
    DuineEile DuineEile is offline

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    We need to be realistic. We have had successes and failures, but this constant craving to be liked and/or recognized grates after a while.

    The next C list foreign celebrity that is dragged onto our TV screens and asked about their connection to Ireland should leap up and throat punch the interviewer.

    If not for themselves, then for the rest of us who have had to suffer this crap for decades.



    D
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  4. #24
    CookieMonster CookieMonster is offline

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    There is a lot of exciting research being done in Ireland outside of academic institutions too.
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  5. #25
    Nudavongs Nudavongs is offline
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    Irish scientists have registered a world first in the production of a substance called graphene, an advanced material that looks set to revolutionise many products from electronics and plastics to touchscreens and batteries.

    Graphene is widely described as a “wonder material” that has astounding properties, but it is notoriously difficult to produce in large amounts of the highest quality and of a consistent size.
    World first for Irish graphene researchers
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  6. #26
    Nudavongs Nudavongs is offline
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    Alzheimer’s disease is characterised, in part, by the build up of toxic material in the brain called amyloid-beta.

    The small protein can get out of the brain in healthy individuals and the Trinity College Dublin scientists have discovered a novel pathway.
    While the mode by which amyloid-betta is cleared remains unclear, it is evident that it needs to be removed from the brain via the bloodstream.

    Research assistant professor in genetics at Trinity College Dublin, Dr Matthew Campbell, said cells lining the blood vessels had junctions holding them tightly together.

    “We discovered that amyloid-beta could move between the junctions. If we can find ways of removing this toxic material in Alzheimer patients, it could lead to a novel way of developing drugs for the disease,” he said.
    Alzheimer’s discovery by Trinity researchers: Irish Examiner
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  7. #27
    Socratus O' Pericles Socratus O' Pericles is offline
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    William Rowan Hamilton: walker, graffiti artist, genius | Access Science

    When William Rowan Hamilton etched the formula for quaternions into Broombridge at Cabra one October morning in 1843, his act of graffiti made a major mark on mathematics.
    The four-dimensional quaternions he described have since enabled developments in telecommunications, computer and movie animation and even space travel, but it doesn’t stop there.
    The Hamilton Walk takes place on Friday, October 16th. The three-mile route is from Dunsink Observatory to Cabra. All are welcome. Book by calling Dr Fiacre Ó Cairbre on 01-7083763
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  8. #28
    Volatire Volatire is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by CookieMonster View Post
    There is a lot of exciting research being done in Ireland outside of academic institutions too.
    There is a bizarre and deeply damaging belief within irish universities that they are the source of all domestically produced knowledge. (EI play in to this fantasy with their ridiculous research voucher schemes for businesses.)

    Thus we hear little about research done outside of Irish academia, while research done by Irish academia is grotesquely over-hyped.
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  9. #29
    Socratus O' Pericles Socratus O' Pericles is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by CookieMonster View Post
    There is a lot of exciting research being done in Ireland outside of academic institutions too.
    Any links?
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  10. #30
    Nudavongs Nudavongs is offline
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    OMG....! Badgers are such sluts.

    Who’s the daddy? Badger reproduction not black and white: Irish Times

    Female badgers will mate with numerous males and can simultaneously carry the young of numerous fathers.

    Known as “natural superfoetation”, it is also an extremely rare ability with just four other species known to be able to do it, she said. Others include the American mink, the brown hare and less well known animals such as the shrew-like Madagascan tenrec.
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