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  1. #11
    JandK JandK is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by RottenBorough View Post
    In the rain in a place where little irish is spoken
    Tá tú saghas doirbh, nach ea?
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  2. #12
    Easilydistracted Easilydistracted is offline
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    Well done for making the effort to learn... you definately need to get to a class or a few conversation circles, its an old cliché but practice makes perfect and the more you speak Irish, the more naturally it will come to you. Adult classes do seem to be quite expensive down south but i would recommend getting in touch with any local Gaelscoileanna, sometimes they run classes or conversations circles for parents, well they do up here anyway. How much would a weekly class cost roughly? In the Cultúrlann in Derry, you can get a 30 week course(2hours p/w) for £60, or for £20 if your on benefits. Apart from that, i agree with cytex, just jump into it, if there are any irish language quiz nights, conversation circles. There is a lot of resources on the internet these days well worth checking out:
    BBC - Irish - Welcome
    www.scríobh.ie(resources and software for writing)
    www.nascanna.ie
    Gaelport.com Príomhshuíomh Eolais na Gaeilge
    www.ranganna.com(online courses)
    www.acmhainn.ie(various dictionarys and term lists to be downloaded)
    www.gaeilge.ie(foras na gaeilges website for info/funding and grant apps/ if you own a business they will do match funding for bilingual signage and materials)
    www.aistear.ie(a website for more advanced speakers on the skill of translation)

    in terms of books, for ulster irish, i would recommend Tús Maith and anything written by A.J Hughes(www.benmadiganpress.com)...for standardised irish i would recommend Gaeilge gan Stró by Éamonn ó Domhnáill

    hope that helps....keep at it and practice, practice practice.

    Labhair í agus mairfidh sí
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  3. #13
    RottenBorough RottenBorough is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by JandK View Post
    Tá tú saghas doirbh, nach ea?
    Realistic I'd say. The gaeltachts are dead. They all play along for the subsidised this that and the other but everyone knows it's little more than a joke for most of them. You'd be amazed at the little perks it brings. All the kids speak english to each other in school all the time and at home I'd guess it's mostly the same
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  4. #14
    KongMing KongMing is offline
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    Well done to you for trying to learn a language as an adult.
    I'm fluent in Irish, although not the best at writing it.
    Being from Galway, there were plenty of native speakers to help me get there.
    "Learning" Irish in school in Ireland was very mundane for me. My teachers had worse Irish than I did, but they knew how to break the language down into the tuiseal ginnideach and the syntax.
    The other part of it that I hated was Peig: "Sean bhean is ea mise anois"
    I'm not sure that there was ever a more depressing story written.

    Suggestions for becoming more fluent that I have would be to go to mass as Gaielge if you can find one and if you attend mass.
    I echo what Statsman said and say plan some trips to Gaeltacht areas.
    Start watching some more television shows as Gaeilge.

    You simply cannot beat immersion.
    It was how I learned French. I went on a six month contract to Bordeaux in the mid-80's.
    Some of the people I worked with had some English, but at the end of the day, I had no choice but to learn.

    Since I moved to the States, I undertook to learn Spanish.
    Rosetta Stone helped me immensely, but I also have a lot of Spanish speakers that I interact with daily.
    What I found great about this course was that it concentrates on speaking the language without getting too bogged down in the grammar.

    Best of luck with it.
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  5. #15
    JandK JandK is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by RottenBorough View Post
    Realistic I'd say. The gaeltachts are dead. They all play along for the subsidised this that and the other but everyone knows it's little more than a joke for most of them. You'd be amazed at the little perks it brings. All the kids speak english to each other in school all the time and at home I'd guess it's mostly the same
    So we shouldn't bother trying to do anything to reverse such a decline or develop an interest in the language?
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  6. #16
    Easilydistracted Easilydistracted is offline
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    double post
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  7. #17
    Spirit Of Newgrange Spirit Of Newgrange is offline

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    one problem with trying irish is all the nutters, included on this website, who say "actually your grammar/spelling etc is incorrect" , how to lose people right from the start. My Spanish/serbo-croat/japanese are all imperfect but the locals congratulate me on my efforts and tell me i am doing well, even when we all know i am making mistakes hand over fist.
    Irish language snobs are killing our native tongue
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  8. #18
    RottenBorough RottenBorough is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by JandK View Post
    So we shouldn't bother trying to do anything to reverse such a decline or develop an interest in the language?
    The OP wants to learn Irish. I'd recommend the south of Spain.
    Bring along Teach yourself irish by Dillon and ó Cróinín, if she can get a copy or else the more recent one by ó Sé and Sheils and teach yourself irish Grammar by ó Dónaill.
    and don't forget the factor 50
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  9. #19
    JandK JandK is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by RottenBorough View Post
    The OP wants to learn Irish. I'd recommend the south of Spain.
    Bring along Teach yourself irish by Dillon and ó Cróinín, if she can get a copy or else the more recent one by ó Sé and Sheils and teach yourself irish Grammar by ó Dónaill.
    and don't forget the factor 50
    And your reason for that spectacular non sequiter is...?
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  10. #20
    statsman statsman is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by JandK View Post
    And your reason for that spectacular non sequiter is...?
    A distaste for rain.
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