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  1. #61
    Kevin Doyle Kevin Doyle is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidcameron View Post
    SIPTU and IMPACT prefer that surplus pen-pushers are retained even though it means that frontline services are cut further in order to save money.
    So you are saying that pen pushers are being retained but front-line staff are being let go?
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  2. #62
    davidcameron davidcameron is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Doyle View Post
    So you are saying that pen pushers are being retained but front-line staff are being let go?
    My point is that redundancies of clerical workers would have saved money, thus allowing for some exemptions from the recruitment moratorium to allow some of the vacancies created by nurses leaving the health service to be filled.
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  3. #63
    Sultan of Ballybrittas Sultan of Ballybrittas is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by davidcameron View Post
    SIPTU and IMPACT prefer that surplus pen-pushers are retained even though it means that frontline services are cut further in order to save money.
    This is just a crazy reaction,how many of these guys were awarded money in army deafness cases.It strikes me as odd that you would not expect noise in the army.What do these guys do all day?
    Any way who wants to invade mullingar ? Would it not be better to redeploy these guys to frontline hospital services or to office duties in garda stations leaving more guards on the beat?
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  4. #64
    O'Sullivan Bere O'Sullivan Bere is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidcameron View Post
    If the planned closures of Army barracks takes place, the transfer of soldiers that would result from the closures would mean that their spouses or partners and their children would have to move house and would be unable to sell their houses without making a loss because of negative equity. Furthermore, the children are likely to suffer emotional trauma because of having to move to different schools.

    It is unfair to put this burden on soldiers, who do not have the right to strike, and their families when civil servants and HSE pen-pushers are protected from this upheaval by the Croke Park Agreement. Jack O'Connor, Blair Horan and Kevin Callinan should hang their heads in shame.
    I see your points, and I don't think all the issues are not reasonably reconcilable.

    I fully agree that soldiers affected by reallocation, cuts and closures, etc, ought not bear the financial hardships concerning housing issues. Soldiers follow orders and deploy and reside wherever ordered. Often times, that means bases out in 'out of the way' places because it was cheaper and easier to house personnel and bases there along with operations.

    With the housing issues that exist now, the government can try to make the most of such situations. Take the Shakleton Barracks in Ballykelly in Co Derry for example. Given the need and use for that base had become fairly obsolete and considering better efficiency, the troops were relocated to London. The barracks were then sold to Merrion Property Development in Dublin who then in turn restructured it into a housing development. They sold like beer on Friday night for modest income people who wanted a place of their own to call home.

    Ex-army homes sell in under eight hours
    Published on Tuesday 11 May 2010 07:46

    More than 300 first-time property owners can't wait to move into their new homes in Ballykelly after the ex-army houses they snapped up sold for bargain prices within hours at the weekend.

    The Loughview development of 317 houses at the former Shackleton Barracks are under new ownership after selling out on Saturday. The first 100 homes sold in a staggering 100 minutes.

    The two, three and four bedroomed houses hit the market priced between 30,000 - 65,000 and were all sold to first time buyers, hundreds of them queuing on the roadside for up to eight days before they went on sale at 9am.

    Among them were Limavady man Stephen McLean and his fiance who were first in the queue and secured the two bedroom house they wanted for an incredible 30,000.

    Also celebrating was a tired but ecstatic bride-to-be Ashley Dickson from Ballykelly. She snapped up a three-bedroom home for 45,000.

    "I never thought it was possible to get a house like this at such good value," beamed the 21-year-old. "We queued from the Saturday and it was definitely worth the wait. Everyone in the queue really pulled together and kept each other positive. I'm getting married next July and this is a fantastic opportunity for me and my fiance. It takes the pressure off. We'd been looking for something for a while and when we heard about these houses we were really impressed. We can enjoy being married and not to have to worry about a big mortgage. We're over the moon."

    Sharleen Doherty from Limavady bought one of the showhouses for 59, 950.

    "This was an absolute dream come true to get on the housing ladder and it's a credit to Bob Mullan who has put everything in the house. I don't need to buy anything," said the 30-year-old.

    Limavady lass Georgina Cosby bagged a three-bed house for 46,500.

    "It's my first house and I'm over the moon," said the 23-year-old. "It's excellent. It still feels a wee bit surreal and I don't think I will believe it until I get the keys. I never really looked for a house before because of the prices but, when I saw these houses and how they were priced, I knew it was too good to miss. My sister and my friend also got a house and we'll all be living next to each other.To be honest, when we started queuing last week I was a bit wary but, DMC took control and they did see everybody right and did it fairly. I was scared that come Saturday match it was going to be a pushing match, but It was all very controlled and fair. If we hadn't of queued we would have missed out."

    The houses were bought from the MoD by Dublin-based Merrion Property Development.

    Patrick Morwood from Merrion realised there would be interest in the properties but was shocked people had queued for up to eight days beforehand.

    "I never for a second thought we would see a sight like this, especially in the middle of a property slump," he said.

    DMC Estate Agents sold the houses for Merrion and Derek McAleese revealed there is now a waiting list of 120 people waiting to snap up any of the 317 homes if sales fall through.

    "There was a good conscious effort to sell to first time buyers so It's great to see it."
    Ex-army homes sell in under eight hours - Local - Derry Journal

    Likewise the government can make a good deal here IMO seeking the best 'win-wins' possible, e.g., selling the bases for funding troop family relocation and/or property swaps with troubled land developers for unsold properties where relocation will occur in exchange for a contract or piece of the action in such a plan, with catches for affordable housing for new families upon redevelopment, etc. One can play with the possibilities for each place, but it can be done well IMO.
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  5. #65
    former wesleyan former wesleyan is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sultan of Ballybrittas View Post
    This is just a crazy reaction,how many of these guys were awarded money in army deafness cases.It strikes me as odd that you would not expect noise in the army.What do these guys do all day?
    Any way who wants to invade mullingar ? Would it not be better to redeploy these guys to frontline hospital services or to office duties in garda stations leaving more guards on the beat?
    I must fire off a LGPMG in you ear sometime to see how you like it without peltors. The deafness case was won because the army didn't do what other armies did, and issue peltors , no other reason.
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  6. #66
    fantapants fantapants is offline

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    what is the necessity of a barracks in cavan town???? I will tell you why.............. because if cavan closes their will be a gap along the border from dundalk yo finner camp in donegal and with that much of a gap god only knows what will be shipped up north or down south arms and explosives wise. Just look to the court case in lativa were a provo said he "wanted a sniper rifle to shoot brits from across the border"
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