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  1. #1
    sking81 sking81 is offline

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    ACC Bank using thugs to carry out illegal repossessions

    I couldn’t find any other threads on this so apologies if there’s one already running. The title says it all really. The judge presiding over the case has dropped herself in hot water with a rather unfortunate jibe at our Polish friends in another case, but in this incidence she's shown considerable backbone.

    Debt collector gets suspended sentence for assaulting Straide man

    To sum it up (some copying and pasting here) a Mr Patrick Ruane took out a loan with ACC and missed three repayments on the van, totalling €843. In the court hearing on July 6, 2011 Mr Ruane said he was ‘terrorised’ by the actions of Faulkner, who he described as a ‘bully’. The court heard how a headbutt from Faulkner to Ruane’s face left Ruane with a broken nose, a split lip and loosened some of his teeth.

    Faulkner, a former officer in the Defence Forces, said he was ‘extremely provoked’ and contested the charges.
    Judge Mary Devins said then that the letter which Faulkner had brought with him to Ruane’s property on behalf of ACC Bank was ‘the worst drafted letter I’ve ever seen’ and it gave ACC no right to take the van, said Judge Devins. ACC’s paperwork was completely faulty and wouldn’t stand up in court.

    The judges quote, “The repossession orders are, quite frankly, nonsense. They don’t make sense in English not to mind law,” she said.

    Does anyone else find this an incredibly sinister case? It appears the banks (or at least ACC) are happy enough to resort to illegal thuggery to collect money owed. I’m thankful my near relatives don’t have any major outstanding loans with banks, but could assure you if the likes of Mr Faulkner came to their door looking for money and I was there, he would be leaving damaged. Thankfully, the judge in this case highlighted the illegality instead of siding with the banks, but I'd be interested to hear if anyone else knows of stories of a similar nature recently?
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  3. #3
    damus damus is offline
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    Ah, another case that's going through the courts involving ex-army personnel - and it won't be the last - so, did Faulker serve his time or did he receive an honorable or an dishonorable discharge?
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  4. #4
    ergo2 ergo2 is offline

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    It does seem that financial institutions are getting desperate if they employ such people
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  5. #5
    Radix Radix is offline

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    Judge Devins also has form.

    It seems she is becoming the champion of the small man where financial institutions are concerned.

    Also in her bailiwick I found this case recently reported where she told Ulster to féck off until they got their own 'technical issues' in order.

    To be honest she has nothing to lose, so why not...

    There are few else standing up for the small man, and in the case of ACC Bank, well let's say they have considerable form also, and should be ran out of Ireland at the end of a big stick!

    Judge adjourns Ulster Bank case until it sorts out problems
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  6. #6
    dizillusioned dizillusioned is offline
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    Amazing case, good on the judge. This is thuggery pure and simple, wonder if the laws pertaining to intruders on your property will apply to these ruffians?
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  7. #7
    sking81 sking81 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Radix View Post
    Judge Devins also has form.

    It seems she is becoming the champion of the small man where financial institutions are concerned.

    Also in her bailiwick I found this case recently reported where she told Ulster to féck off until they got their own 'technical issues' in order.

    To be honest she has nothing to lose, so why not...

    There are few else standing up for the small man, and in the case of ACC Bank, well let's say they have considerable form also, and should be ran out of Ireland at the end of a big stick!

    Judge adjourns Ulster Bank case until it sorts out problems
    Fair play to her. Be interesting to see if the chaps going bananas over her remark towards the Polish have any links to the banks. She must be quite the pain in the hole for them.

    Quote Originally Posted by dizillusioned View Post
    Amazing case, good on the judge. This is thuggery pure and simple, wonder if the laws pertaining to intruders on your property will apply to these ruffians?
    If they don’t have proper documentation to be there and have been asked to leave, I would think so. Frankly, it’s an irrelevance-the ones that deserve to be charged here are the bank managers who signed off on hiring them. Don Corleone possessed more subtlety than these guys.
    Last edited by sking81; 31st July 2012 at 11:14 PM.
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  8. #8
    ObsessiveMathsFreak ObsessiveMathsFreak is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by sking81 View Post
    The court heard how a headbutt from Faulkner to Ruane’s face left Ruane with a broken nose, a split lip and loosened some of his teeth.
    And all he got was a suspended sentence. The fear of god will be put into any and every man, woman, and child in the state who owes, or whose family owes ACC money. This case is a winner all round for the bank and no mistake.

    Once again, the Irish judiciary have seen injustice done. There's no law in Ireland.
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  9. #9
    sking81 sking81 is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by ObsessiveMathsFreak View Post
    And all he got was a suspended sentence. The fear of god will be put into any and every man, woman, and child in the state who owes, or whose family owes ACC money. This case is a winner all round for the bank and no mistake.

    Once again, the Irish judiciary have seen injustice done. There's no law in Ireland.
    I think not. I'd have liked to see him jailed, but the main culprits in this case are the management of ACC bank. Locking up their lackey wouldnt have served any major purpose in the grand scheme of things. As is, he's pretty much a neutered dog.

    I'd imagine now would be a good time for anyone with a threat of repossession hanging over them read up on exactly what documents the banks need in order to have someone come onto your property and legally repossess goods, and warn them not to come near to come near the place without them.
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  10. #10
    Boggle Boggle is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by sking81 View Post
    I think not. I'd have liked to see him jailed, but the main culprits in this case are the management of ACC bank. Locking up their lackey wouldnt have served any major purpose in the grand scheme of things. As is, he's pretty much a neutered dog.

    I'd imagine now would be a good time for anyone with a threat of repossession hanging over them read up on exactly what documents the banks need in order to have someone come onto your property and legally repossess goods, and warn them not to come near to come near the place without them.
    MathFreak is right. If this is all that happens then Bailiffs can come and physically threaten people all they like and people will be afraid of them. Why wouldn't they be afraid, if it comes to blows these scumbags will only get a good talking to.

    You can say that the bank is equally culpable but they probably aren't... legally at least. They probably hire firms with high success rates or some such criteria and there is probably not a bit of evidence implicating the bank of wrongdoing.
    You'd have to be an idiot to leave evidence in such a basic crime to be honest.
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