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  1. #41
    Gael Gael is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by tumeltyni
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Mac an Phríora
    Yeah, I did one last year to brush up, very well organised, learned loads. A bit put out by the Italian in my class that was able to give me the word I was looking for once or twice too often
    Damn foreigners, stealing our jobs, women AND our language!
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  2. #42
    paypal paypal is offline

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    "Damn foreigners, stealing our jobs, women AND our language"

    It's interesting that of the handful of foreigners who study Irish probably the biggest single groupare Americans. I've met a number of Americans with good Irish, most of them had no family links to this country. The next group for learning the language are Western Europeans. There are a number (still tiny, of course) of Spaniards, Dutch etc. who have learned Irish to a good standard.
    All of these people tend to be, shall we say, of the middle or professional classes. It seems none of the hundreds of thousands of immigrants from Eastern Europe are interested in the language. In fact one of the great attractions about Ireland for these people is the fact that it's English speaking. I live fairly near to a gaeltacht, and I hear that the influx of these immigrants is putting even greater strain on an already weak Irish language environment.
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  3. #43
    gaelach gaelach is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by paypal
    "Damn foreigners, stealing our jobs, women AND our language"

    It's interesting that of the handful of foreigners who study Irish probably the biggest single groupare Americans. I've met a number of Americans with good Irish, most of them had no family links to this country. The next group for learning the language are Western Europeans. There are a number (still tiny, of course) of Spaniards, Dutch etc. who have learned Irish to a good standard.
    All of these people tend to be, shall we say, of the middle or professional classes. It seems none of the hundreds of thousands of immigrants from Eastern Europe are interested in the language. In fact one of the great attractions about Ireland for these people is the fact that it's English speaking. I live fairly near to a gaeltacht, and I hear that the influx of these immigrants is putting even greater strain on an already weak Irish language environment.
    The problems the Irish language have,come directly from the Irish people,the "oh I wish I could speak Irish" type,who when asked why they dont learn it,reply "oh sure I couldnt,I`m too old now"(heard this from a 16 year old!!).So dont even try and blame foriegners Paypal.

    It has nothing to do with them,and to blame them,would merely shift the responsibility from us to them.If the Irish language dies;Is ar muintir na h-éireann a bhéis an locht.
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  4. #44
    Gael Gael is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by gaelach

    It has nothing to do with them,and to blame them,would merely shift the responsibility from us to them.If the Irish language dies;Is ar muintir na h-éireann a bhéis an locht.
    Amen.
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  5. #45
    paypal paypal is offline

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    gaelach:

    "So dont even try and blame foriegners Paypal. "

    Quite a stupid remark, gaelach, since I did not "try to blame foreigners".

    If you're going to answer my posts, please read them first.
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  6. #46
    Seánod Seánod is offline

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    Some phrases from the northern end...


    Asking someone how they are
    Cad é mar atá tú? How are you?
    Cén do/igh? How's things
    Cad é mar atá an saol agat? How's life treating you this weather?
    An bhfuil a dhath ag gabháil (a-gull)? Anything happening?
    Tá tú beo leat! I see you're alive and well (to someone you haven't seen in a while)

    Types of responses
    Tá mé go maith. I'm fine.
    go breá, go raibh maith agat. Great, thanks.
    Och, ag gabháil liom... och I'm getting by, managing
    Tá mé i gceart... I'm rightly
    Tá mé go measartha... I'm middling
    Níl caill orm... I can't complain
    Tá do/igh amach orm... I'm in great form


    Is beatha teanga í a labhairt... the lifeblood of the language is in speech...

    There's enough people out there wanting to learn and use the language, that I put most of my efforts into helping them... rather than expending valuable energy on debating with people who have no real interest in it...

    What can a non-fluent person do to promote the language? Debate it? Say nice things about it? Defend it? Maybe, but they'd be doing a lot more if they just started by saying "slán" at the end of every conversation on the phone or in the street or in the bar or in the shop. Think of how often you would say that word... and how much it would get noticed, and become natural after a while. It can be done... my wife is not a fluent speaker, but she now has a number of phrases she uses every day and everywhere she goes.
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  7. #47
    codology codology is offline

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    roc go néirí leat leis an caint.One thing you will find is the small group of gaelgeórí who will look down their srón at people who arent perfect at their gaelige,tá siad lán de buinneach(look it up)
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  8. #48
    Darren Mac an Phríora Darren Mac an Phríora is offline
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    Having attended Irish classes when I was finished school and having been a facilitor for Irish classes in Conradh na Gaeilge (before they went 'extreme'? ) I know how frustrating it can be to relearn the Irish you already have, to be confident again, but then find that you do not have many people to speak it to and let it go again after a few weeks.

    Tá easpa spiorad ann- there is a lack of spirit.

    You have to get to know gaelgoirí in your community. Meeting them at conversation circles (e.g in Libaries) is a great place.

    Then, always speak to them in Irish.

    Obviously, the Irish media- particularly TG4, Raidió na Gaeltachta and- if you are around Dublin or Belfast- Raidió na Life and Raidió Fáilte- are great.

    You have to speak Irish- as in a proper conversation- once a week. Sin é. Go n-éirí leat.
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  9. #49
    Shankill Browser Shankill Browser is offline

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    Hi All, first post on here though I've been an unregistered lurker for a while now. It's a great site with many interesting posts. I'm looking forward to catching up with all the latest and may be contributing to some of them myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Westie24
    It's a beautiful language and should be treated as such and not as a political tennis ball in the North.
    I've heard it spoken (what sounded to me) beautifully and i've heard it spoken (what sounded to me) cringingly harsh. I believe that a hard brogue / Belfast accent does nothing for it. I saw a guy on TV (BBC2 SRL)? from Galway or Donegal who spoke Irish as his main language. He was mending a boat and when he spoke, it was like poetry, a soft lilting melody. Absolutey beautiful.
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