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  1. #1
    Cai Cai is offline

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    The use of Irish in local government administration

    Ynys Mon (Anglesey) Council today decided to make Welsh it's sole administrative language. The council came under Plaid Cymru control earlier this year.

    Council to make Welsh its first language ... but struggles to recruit bilingual staff - Daily Post

    It thus brings itelf into line with Gwynedd Council which is situated on the other side of the Menai. Gwynedd has followed the policy since it's creation in it's current form three decades ago - & there have been few if any problems.

    Now it's unlikely that any Irish county could make Irish it's only administrative language - but could Donegal or Galway move in that direction & make far greater use of it in it's administration?
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  2. #2
    Darren J. Prior Darren J. Prior is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cai View Post
    Ynys Mon (Anglesey) Council today decided to make Welsh it's sole administrative language. The council came under Plaid Cymru control earlier this year.

    ...

    It thus brings itelf into line with Gwynedd Council which is situated on the other side of the Menai.
    Good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cai View Post
    Now it's unlikely that any Irish county could make Irish it's only administrative language - but could Donegal or Galway move in that direction & make far greater use of it in it's administration?
    I don't know for sure but we already have Údaras na Gaeltachta ("The Gaeltacht Authority") based in Furbo / Na Forbarcha in Conamara which is in some ways like a Gaeltacht County Council. Maybe someone else can clarfiy the difference between it and county councils. I would be surprised if Galway County Council and Donegal County Council do not have strong Irish language provision of services in their councils.

    A sad thing about UnaG and the Gaeltacht in general is that the Gaeltacht boundaries have still not be redrawn. They will be probably in several years but it's sad that there are large areas officially in the Gaeltacht and part of UnaG's remit that do not have any, or only little, Irish spoken in them in the community. Furbo is not even much of a Gaeltacht either or so I have heard!
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  3. #3
    drjimryan2 drjimryan2 is offline

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    should be left as a hobby language....

    I agree with the dup on this one....
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  4. #4
    Deadlock Deadlock is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren J. Prior View Post
    Good.



    I don't know for sure but we already have Údaras na Gaeltachta ("The Gaeltacht Authority") based in Furbo / Na Forbarcha in Conamara which is in some ways like a Gaeltacht County Council. Maybe someone else can clarfiy the difference between it and county councils. I would be surprised if Galway County Council and Donegal County Council do not have strong Irish language provision of services in their councils.

    A sad thing about UnaG and the Gaeltacht in general is that the Gaeltacht boundaries have still not be redrawn. They will be probably in several years but it's sad that there are large areas officially in the Gaeltacht and part of UnaG's remit that do not have any, or only little, Irish spoken in them in the community. Furbo is not even much of a Gaeltacht either or so I have heard!
    Can I ask out of uninformed curiosity, if you think that the Gaeltacht boundaries are in need of redrawing, is that because they are growing or in retreat?
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  5. #5
    USER1234 USER1234 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cai View Post
    Now it's unlikely that any Irish county could make Irish it's only administrative language - but could Donegal or Galway move in that direction & make far greater use of it in it's administration?
    Not only is it unlikely but it would be illegal while irish is the first offical language, english is also an offical language therefore they coudnt refuse to do business in English!

    Also it would be highly impractical as most people dont know irish well enough & because of this it would impeade peoples right to what councils are doing on their behalf
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  6. #6
    cricket cricket is offline

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    It is almost impossible to do business as gaeilge with most government departments without massive hassle.
    As for semi-states, a complete no-no.
    That's why the shinners demands of a rights based language act in the north are crazy. Designed to annoy the other side rather than promote the language.
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  7. #7
    Windowshopper Windowshopper is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricket View Post
    It is almost impossible to do business as gaeilge with most government departments without massive hassle.
    As for semi-states, a complete no-no.
    That's why the shinners demands of a rights based language act in the north are crazy. Designed to annoy the other side rather than promote the language.
    While I do think there is some DUP poking going on, I think the reason Acht na Gaeilge has got so much traction is that Irish is as much a symbol as an actual language and the DUP's attitude towards it is seen as a stand in to their attitude towards nationalists. It must be really annoying being a nationalist listening to your ancestral language, even if one does not speak it, being disrespected while having to tolerate marches and (in their eyes) other displays of cultural supremacism on an ongoing basis. I suspect that nationalism feels that it signed up to the GFA status quo in good faith, and that the DUP hasn't.
    Last edited by Windowshopper; 13th December 2017 at 02:15 PM.
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  8. #8
    hollandia hollandia is online now
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricket View Post
    It is almost impossible to do business as gaeilge with most government departments without massive hassle.
    As for semi-states, a complete no-no.
    That's why the shinners demands of a rights based language act in the north are crazy. Designed to annoy the other side rather than promote the language.
    Yes, that's why the SDLP, the greens, alliance and PBP are asking for it too.

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  9. #9
    cricket cricket is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by Windowshopper View Post
    While I do think there is some DUP poking going on, I think the reason Acht na Gaeilge has got so much traction is that Irish is as much a symbol as an actual language and the DUP's attitude towards it is seen as a stand in to their attitude towards nationalists. It must be really annoying being a nationalist listening to your ancestral language, even if one does not speaks it, being disrespected while having to tolerate marches and (in their eyes) other displays of cultural supremacism on an ongoing basis. I suspect that nationalism feels that it signed up to the GFA status quo in good faith, and that the DUP hasn't.
    I agree that neanderthals like Campbell and others have engaged in obscene behaviour towards the language and did so long before the language act became an issue. A rights based act, however, would, apparently, give anyone the legal right to conduct business with the state as gaeilge. As I said, you can't even do that in ROI. I previously posted about a relative who, after years of trying,eventually gave up, when dealing with the tax office especially.

    If tried in the north, it would create so much resentment that the language would become a fountain of hate .Peig Sayers for nordies.
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  10. #10
    Carlos Danger Carlos Danger is offline
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    Interesting that you chose Galway as one of your County Councils.

    Once upon a time, Galway had a mayor who insisted that people used his name as Gaeilge. It was on his election propaganda and posters, the ballot etc.

    He had designs on higher office and ran for the Dáil, still insisting that he be known by his name as Gaeilge. People throughout the constituency of Galway West would expect to be able to converse as Gaeilge with anyone who had insisted that they be called by their ainm Gaeleach. Poor lad hit the doorsteps and had barely a word of Irish...Is maith liom cáca milis. type of thing.

    Ended in tears, and an appointment to the Senate courtesy of na Glasraí. That also ended in tears. He was even reduced to posting on here for a while.

    So...while there's certainly a chance that certain areas of particular districts in a few counties could (and some even do) conduct their day to day as Gaeilge, I'm not sure that there's much chance that we're going to see it on a county council level.
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