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  1. #21
    Carlos Danger Carlos Danger is offline
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    Free water.
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  2. #22
    Congalltee Congalltee is offline

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    Quote Originally Posted by redhead View Post
    Don't know if I count as a foreigner but more and more I am starting to think of myself as one. Grew up in the UK and have lived here more than half my life, family of origin Irish, Irish passport BUT that pesky English accent means I am always interrogated (and that is really what it feels like).

    I find it especially difficult when I go into a new work situation or meet new colleagues, people always think they're being friendly but I find it really obtrusive. I've noticed it with newly arrived non nationals as well. Not all are uncomfortable with it but some are.

    I think it is because even now with all the changes in Irish society in the past twenty years that the underlying behaviour hasn't really caught up. We are still very parochial, "where do you live, which street, do ye know x,y,z?"

    That's fine when you live in a homogenous society where everyone is the same, has pretty much the same education, the same cultural references, the same family complexion.

    I know it's a natural reaction, when we meet new people we want to know a bit about them, find out who we're dealing with but sometimes people have things they'd rather not talk about for reasons they shouldn't have to explain. There's a sort of a lack of understanding of this and a lack of respecting other people's privacy and right to privacy.

    And it's funny because ironically the media in Ireland is far more respectful of the rights of its citizens, particularly public representatives than the media in the UK, it's just that it doesn't seem to extend to ordinary everyday people respecting each other in this way.

    So that would be my suggestion, learn to be a bit more circumspect, don't assume the right to ask people personal questions and realise that questions about family or marital status etc. are personal questions.
    "How long have you been here?" and "where are you from?" are normal questions to ask a non-Pale person in Dublin, but it takes on a much more instusive tone asking a person who is not pale.
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  3. #23
    the secretary the secretary is offline
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    Wakes! Most foreigners think it a strange but nice tradition.
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  4. #24
    Rural Rural is offline
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    I was talking to a lad from Egypt recently who found our weather quite baffling and a few years back a German couple said that the way the Irish couldn't queue properly was a bit bonkers.

    The queuing thing is solved nowadays with the "take a ticket and wait your turn" system. Although, a few years back someone forgot to fill the machine with tickets at the local Community Welfare Office and I believe it was mayhem.
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  5. #25
    dizillusioned dizillusioned is offline
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    OK...This IS about Americans but here goes:

    The fact we don't all eat Corned Beef and Cabbage.

    The fact we speak so fast.

    Our sense of sarcasm (well that could just be MY sense of sarcasm)

    Other Countries and friends:

    They cannot understand the pronunciation of words. Our accents. The cost of everything here, especially housing and cars.

    Items specifically to me:

    SatNav in the States has a hard time understanding me...
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  6. #26
    EoinMag EoinMag is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carlos Danger View Post
    Free water.
    Oh the inhumanity.
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  7. #27
    Fritzbox Fritzbox is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by raetsel View Post

    I don't recognise that at all.
    Well Ok, the Irish fascination for dead people and what happens to them afterwards, perhaps?
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  8. #28
    sic transit sic transit is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhead View Post
    Don't know if I count as a foreigner but more and more I am starting to think of myself as one. Grew up in the UK and have lived here more than half my life, family of origin Irish, Irish passport BUT that pesky English accent means I am always interrogated (and that is really what it feels like).

    I find it especially difficult when I go into a new work situation or meet new colleagues, people always think they're being friendly but I find it really obtrusive. I've noticed it with newly arrived non nationals as well. Not all are uncomfortable with it but some are.

    I think it is because even now with all the changes in Irish society in the past twenty years that the underlying behaviour hasn't really caught up. We are still very parochial, "where do you live, which street, do ye know x,y,z?"

    That's fine when you live in a homogenous society where everyone is the same, has pretty much the same education, the same cultural references, the same family complexion.

    I know it's a natural reaction, when we meet new people we want to know a bit about them, find out who we're dealing with but sometimes people have things they'd rather not talk about for reasons they shouldn't have to explain. There's a sort of a lack of understanding of this and a lack of respecting other people's privacy and right to privacy.

    And it's funny because ironically the media in Ireland is far more respectful of the rights of its citizens, particularly public representatives than the media in the UK, it's just that it doesn't seem to extend to ordinary everyday people respecting each other in this way.

    So that would be my suggestion, learn to be a bit more circumspect, don't assume the right to ask people personal questions and realise that questions about family or marital status etc. are personal questions.
    You need to lighten up and prepare a script to fend off the personal questions or just ask back! It might be more about your own upbringing anyway. I rarely hear this as a problem but actually getting to know us is. That and the accents!
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  9. #29
    JimmyFoley JimmyFoley is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by Congalltee View Post
    1) a first world health system, but a 3rd world A&E system to get into it.
    2) rent inflation, poor tenant rights, obsession about ownership
    3) baptism barrier in schools.
    4) Good Friday drinking ban.
    5) having a homelessness crisis with over 250,000 empty properties.
    6) that thevirush language is the first official language but it is rarely heard in a natural setting outside of a few small areas
    7) why FG and FF both exist.
    8) That we didn't riot or hold a national strike during savage cuts to public services from Lenihan/Noonan and that we're now blasÚ about not collecting Apple money.

    [please add, elaborate, [don"t] tell them to go back home if they don't like it, suggest improvements etc]
    The amount of time we spend talking about the weather.

    And it's true. Ive often spent 10 minutes talking to a complete stranger about how heavy it was yesterday.
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  10. #30
    mac tÝre mac tÝre is offline
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    It's not an aspect they find bewildering but they do think it quaint and quite cool - the way many of us in my locality still say "hello" in the street as they pass by. It's quite gratifying when you say that and the reply has a foreign accent.
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